Publications by authors named "W Michael Hooten"

160 Publications

Effects of the ABCB1 c.3435C>T (rs1045642) Polymorphism on Heat Pain Perception in Opioid-Free Adults With Chronic Pain.

Anesth Analg 2021 Jun 21. Epub 2021 Jun 21.

Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

Background: The adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette, subfamily B, member 1 gene (ABCB1) encodes P-glycoprotein (P-gp) that influences the intracellular transport of solutes including endogenous opioid peptides. The primary objective of this study was to determine the effects of the ABCB1 polymorphism c.3435C>T (rs10454642) on heat pain (HP) perception in a group of opioid-free adults with chronic pain.

Methods: Opioid-free adults with chronic pain consecutively admitted to a pain rehabilitation program comprised the study cohort (N = 134). Individuals were genotyped for the c.3435C>T (rs10454642) polymorphism. The polymorphism was analyzed with nonparametric tests using a dominant (cytosine-cytosine [CC] versus cytosine-thymine [CT] + thymine-thymine [TT]) and recessive (CC + CT versus TT) model of allele effects. Quantitative sensory testing was performed using the Computer Aided Sensory Evaluator IV system.

Results: The distribution of genotypes was 22% (N = 29) for CC, 45% (N = 60) for CT, and 33% (N = 45) for TT (Hardy-Weinberg, P > .1). A significant association was observed between the recessive model and HP threshold. Standardized values of HP threshold were significantly greater in the TT group than the CC + CT group (median difference, -0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.49 to -0.23; P = .005), and the effect size estimate was small (Cliff delta = 0.30). In the dominant model, no significant difference in HP threshold was observed between the CC and CT + TT groups (median difference, -0.45; 95% CI, -1.15 to 0.00; P = .108).

Conclusions: These results posit that the efflux of endogenous opioid peptides is reduced in individuals with the TT genotype due to lower expression of P-gp, which, in turn, results in higher HP threshold. This study contributes to the emerging understanding of how the ABCB1 c.3435C>T polymorphism contributes to pain perception in opioid-free adults with chronic pain and provides the foundation for investigating the potential effects of this polymorphism on the clinical course of chronic pain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1213/ANE.0000000000005629DOI Listing
June 2021

Infectious Complications of Dorsal Root Ganglion Stimulation: A Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis of Incidence.

Neuromodulation 2021 Jun 6. Epub 2021 Jun 6.

Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Background And Objectives: Dorsal root ganglion stimulation (DRGS) is a newer form of neuromodulation that targets the dorsal root ganglion. DRGS has superior efficacy in complex regional pain syndrome compared to spinal cord stimulation (SCS) and may have efficacy in other forms of chronic pain. While decades of safety data are available for SCS, there is less available safety information for DRGS. The objectives of this systematic review and pooled analysis of incidence are to determine the overall incidence of DRGS infections, incidence at each stage (trial vs. implant vs. revision), infection characteristics, and outcomes.

Materials And Methods: A comprehensive search of databases from January 1980 to January 2021 was conducted.

Results: Ten studies met inclusion criteria. Eight studies reported patients with trial data (n = 291), ten studies reported patients with implant data (n = 250), and seven studies reported data with revisions (n = 26). The pooled incidence of trial infections was 1.03% (95% CI 0.35-2.99%), implant infections was 4.80% (95% CI 2.77-8.20%), revision infections was 3.85% (95% CI 0.20-21.59%), and overall infections was 2.82% (95% CI 1.62-4.54%). There was a statistically significant difference in infection rates between the trial, implant, and revision stages, X (2, N = 567) = 8.9839, p = 0.01.

Conclusions: This is the first systematic review and pooled analysis that followed PRISMA guidelines to report infectious complications of DRGS by stage (trial vs. implant vs. revision). DRGS trial appears to be low risk for infection but that risk is significantly increased with DRGS implant. Our findings highlight the need for further study of infectious complications, their risks, and optimal prophylaxis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ner.13473DOI Listing
June 2021

Chronic pain: an update on burden, best practices, and new advances.

Lancet 2021 May;397(10289):2082-2097

Mayo School of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA.

Chronic pain exerts an enormous personal and economic burden, affecting more than 30% of people worldwide according to some studies. Unlike acute pain, which carries survival value, chronic pain might be best considered to be a disease, with treatment (eg, to be active despite the pain) and psychological (eg, pain acceptance and optimism as goals) implications. Pain can be categorised as nociceptive (from tissue injury), neuropathic (from nerve injury), or nociplastic (from a sensitised nervous system), all of which affect work-up and treatment decisions at every level; however, in practice there is considerable overlap in the different types of pain mechanisms within and between patients, so many experts consider pain classification as a continuum. The biopsychosocial model of pain presents physical symptoms as the denouement of a dynamic interaction between biological, psychological, and social factors. Although it is widely known that pain can cause psychological distress and sleep problems, many medical practitioners do not realise that these associations are bidirectional. While predisposing factors and consequences of chronic pain are well known, the flipside is that factors promoting resilience, such as emotional support systems and good health, can promote healing and reduce pain chronification. Quality of life indicators and neuroplastic changes might also be reversible with adequate pain management. Clinical trials and guidelines typically recommend a personalised multimodal, interdisciplinary treatment approach, which might include pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, integrative treatments, and invasive procedures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(21)00393-7DOI Listing
May 2021

Lidocaine for postoperative pain after cardiac surgery: a systematic review.

J Cardiothorac Surg 2021 May 31;16(1):157. Epub 2021 May 31.

Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN, 55902, USA.

Objective: Lidocaine is one of the most widely used local anesthetics with well-known pharmacological properties. The purpose of this systematic review is to investigate the effects of lidocaine on postoperative pain scores and recovery after cardiac surgery.

Methods: A comprehensive database search was conducted by a reference librarian for randomized clinical trials (RCT) from January 1, 1980 to September 1, 2019. Eligible study designs included randomized controlled trials of lidocaine for postoperative pain management in adults undergoing cardiac surgery. After removal of duplicates, 947 records were screened for eligibility and 3 RCTs met inclusion criteria.

Results: Sources of bias were identified in 2 of 3 RCTs. Lidocaine was administered intravenously, topically, and intrapleurally. Key findings included [1] 2% lidocaine placed topically on chest tube prior to intraoperative insertion was associated with significantly lower pain scores and lower cumulative doses of fentanyl; and [2] 2% lidocaine administered intrapleurally was associated with significantly lower pain scores and significant improvements in pulmonary mechanics. Lidocaine infusions were not associated with significant changes in pain scores or measures of recovery. No significant associations were observed between lidocaine and overall mortality, hospital length of stay or ICU length of stay. No data were reported for postoperative nausea and vomiting or arrhythmias.

Conclusions: Due to the favorable risk profile of topical lidocaine and the need for further advancements in the postoperative care of adults after cardiac surgery, topically administered lidocaine could be considered for incorporation into established postoperative recovery protocols.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13019-021-01549-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8166031PMC
May 2021

Prevalence of postamputation pain and its subtypes: a meta-analysis with meta-regression.

Pain Rep 2021 4;6(1):e918. Epub 2021 May 4.

Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Division of Pain Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Introduction: The inconsistent use of standardized approaches for classifying postamputation pain (PAP) has been a barrier to establishing its prevalence.

Objectives: The primary objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to determine the prevalence of nontraumatic lower-extremity PAP using an established taxonomy. The secondary objective is to determine the prevalence of PAP subtypes, including phantom limb pain and residual limb pain (RLP).

Methods: An a priori protocol was registered, and a database search was conducted by a reference librarian. Randomized trials and uncontrolled studies were eligible for inclusion. The risk of bias was assessed using a tool developed for uncontrolled studies. A total of 2679 studies were screened, and 13 studies met inclusion criteria (n = 1063).

Results: The sources of risk of bias included selection bias and, to a lesser extent, whether the outcome was adequately ascertained. Two studies reported the prevalence of PAP and the pooled prevalence was 61% (95% confidence interval [CI], 33%-86%) with high heterogeneity (I = 93%). Thirteen studies reported the prevalence of phantom limb pain and the pooled prevalence was 53% (95% CI, 40%-66%) with high heterogeneity (I = 93%). Eight studies reported the prevalence of RLP and the pooled prevalence was 32% (95% CI 24%-41%) with high heterogeneity (I = 76%). Clinical subtypes of RLP were not reported.

Conclusions: The prevalence of PAP is high in patients with nontraumatic lower-extremity amputations. Ongoing research that uses a taxonomy for PAP is needed to fully delineate the prevalence of PAP subtypes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PR9.0000000000000918DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8108594PMC
May 2021
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