Publications by authors named "W A Borstlap"

105 Publications

Prognostic importance of lymph node count and ratio in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy: Results from a cross-sectional study.

J Surg Oncol 2021 May 14. Epub 2021 May 14.

Department of Surgery, Isala Hospital Zwolle, Zwolle, the Netherlands.

Background: The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of lymph node count (LNC) and lymph node ratio (LNR) in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT).

Methods: Patients who underwent neoadjuvant CRT and total mesorectal excision (TME) for Stage I-III rectal cancer were selected from a cross-sectional study including 71 Dutch centres. Primary outcome parameters were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Prognostic significance of LNC and LNR (cut-off values 0.15, 0.20, 0.30) was tested for different (sub)groups.

Results: From 2095 registered patients, 458 were included, of which 240 patients with LNC < 12 and 218 patients with LNC ≥ 12. LNC was not significantly associated with DFS (p = 0.35) and OS (p = 0.59). In univariable analysis, LNR was significantly associated with DFS and OS in the whole cohort and LNC subgroups, but not in multivariable analysis.

Conclusions: LNC was not associated with long-term oncological outcome in rectal cancer patients treated with CRT, nor was LNR when corrected for N-stage. However, LNR might be used to identify subgroups of node-positive patients with a favourable outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.26522DOI Listing
May 2021

Reply to Kazi et al.

Colorectal Dis 2021 May 2;23(5):1271-1272. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Department of Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, Cancer Center Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/codi.15579DOI Listing
May 2021

[Oral and maxillofacial surgeons' satisfaction of the use of procedural sedation and/or analgesia (PSA) in the clinic].

Ned Tijdschr Tandheelkd 2021 Jan;128(1):47-51

Fear of orofacial interventions is a very common problem. Procedural sedation and/or analgesia (PSA) offers added value in reducing anxiety, pain and discomfort. At the Radboud University Medical Centre (Nijmegen, the Netherlands) PSA is conducted under the guidance of physician assistants, resulting in a high degree of patient satisfaction. In this study, the 115 surgeons' satisfaction with PSA procedures for outpatient orofacial surgical interventions was evaluated by means of questionnaires. The study's conclusion is that oral and maxillofacial surgeons are highly satisfied when PSA is administered to very anxious patients. The collaboration with the department of anaestesiology ensures that the outpatient interventions can be performed safely and efficiently by the oral and maxillofacial surgeon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5177/ntvt.2021.01.20030DOI Listing
January 2021

Time interval between self-expandable metal stent placement or creation of a decompressing stoma and elective resection of left-sided obstructive colon cancer.

Endoscopy 2020 Dec 18. Epub 2020 Dec 18.

Department of Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Background:  The optimal timing of resection after decompression of left-sided obstructive colon cancer is unknown. Revised expert-based guideline recommendations have shifted from an interval of 5 - 10 days to approximately 2 weeks following self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement, and recommendations after decompressing stoma are lacking. We aimed to evaluate the recommended bridging intervals after SEMS and explore the timing of resection after decompressing stoma.

Methods:  This nationwide study included patients registered between 2009 and 2016 in the prospective, mandatory Dutch ColoRectal Audit. Additional data were collected through patient records in 75 hospitals. Only patients who underwent either SEMS placement or decompressing stoma as a bridge to surgery were selected. Technical SEMS failure and unsuccessful decompression within 48 hours were exclusion criteria.

Results:  510 patients were included (182 SEMS, 328 decompressing stoma). Median bridging interval was 23 days (interquartile range [IQR] 13 - 31) for SEMS and 36 days (IQR 22 - 65) for decompressing stoma. Following SEMS placement, no significant differences in post-resection complications, hospital stay, or laparoscopic resections were observed with resection after 11 - 17 days compared with 5 - 10 days. Of SEMS-related complications, 48 % occurred in patients operated on beyond 17 days. Compared with resection within 14 days, an interval of 14 - 28 days following decompressing stoma resulted in significantly more laparoscopic resections, more primary anastomoses, and shorter hospital stays. No impact of bridging interval on mortality, disease-free survival, or overall survival was demonstrated.

Conclusions:  Based on an overview of the data with balancing of surgical outcomes and timing of adverse events, a bridging interval of approximately 2 weeks seems appropriate after SEMS placement, while waiting 2 - 4 weeks after decompressing stoma further optimizes surgical conditions for laparoscopic resection with restoration of bowel continuity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1308-1487DOI Listing
December 2020

Does oncological outcome differ between restorative and nonrestorative low anterior resection in patients with primary rectal cancer?

Colorectal Dis 2021 Apr 15;23(4):843-852. Epub 2020 Dec 15.

Department of Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, Cancer Center Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Aim: Nonrestorative low anterior resection (n-rLAR) (also known as low Hartmann's) is performed for rectal cancer when a poor functional outcome is anticipated or there have been problems when constructing the anastomosis. Compared with restorative LAR (rLAR), little oncological outcome data are available for n-rLAR. The aim of this study was to compare oncological outcomes between rLAR and n-rLAR for primary rectal cancer.

Method: This was a nationwide cross-sectional comparative study including all elective sphincter-saving LAR procedures for nonmetastatic primary rectal cancer performed in 2011 in 71 Dutch hospitals. Oncological outcomes of patients undergoing rLAR and n-rLAR were collected in 2015; the data were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and the results compared using log-rank testing. Uni- and multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between the type of LAR and oncological outcome measures.

Results: A total of 1197 patients were analysed, of whom 892 (75%) underwent rLAR and 305 (25%) underwent n-rLAR. The 3-year local recurrence (LR) rate was 3% after rLAR and 8% after n-rLAR (P < 0.001). The 3-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 77% (rLAR) vs 62% (n-rLAR) (P < 0.001) and 90% (rLAR) vs 75% (n-rLAR) (P < 0.001), respectively. In multivariable Cox analysis, n-rLAR was independently associated with a higher risk of LR (OR = 2.95) and worse overall survival (OR = 1.72).

Conclusion: This nationwide study revealed that n-rLAR for rectal cancer was associated with poorer oncological outcome than r-LAR. This is probably a noncausal relationship, and might reflect technical difficulties during low pelvic dissection in a subset of those patients, with oncological implications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/codi.15464DOI Listing
April 2021