Publications by authors named "Vlatko Separovic"

5 Publications

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Evidencing the influence of pre-pandemic sports participation and substance misuse on physical activity during the COVID‑19 lockdown: a prospective analysis among older adolescents.

Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2021 May 22;34(2):151-163. Epub 2021 Mar 22.

University of Split, Split, Croatia (Faculty of Kinesiology).

Objectives: The physical activity level (PAL) has significantly decreased as a result of the social distancing and lockdown related to the COVID‑19 pandemic, but there is a lack of knowledge on the correlates of PAL during the pandemic. The aim of this research was to examine the influence of pre-pandemic sports participation and substance use and misuse (SUM) on PAL during the COVID‑19 pandemic.

Material And Methods: The study included 661 high-school students from Bosnia and Herzegovina (aged 15-18 years, 292 females). The investigation included 2 testing waves: before the COVID‑19 pandemic (baseline, January 2020) and during the COVID‑19 lockdown (follow-up, April 2020). The variables included PAL as measured by the , sports factors, and SUM.

Results: Sports factors at baseline were positively correlated with PALs at both baseline and follow-up. Smoking tobacco negatively affected PALs at both baseline and follow-up. Alcohol consumption was positively correlated with PAL at baseline but had no effect on PAL at follow-up.

Conclusions: This study confirmed the importance of sports participation in maintaining PAL during challenging situations, such as the COVID‑19 lockdown. The substance-specific influence of SUM on PAL before and during the lockdown points to evident social and cultural aspects of SUM behaviors in adolescents. Further studies evidencing the cumulative effects of PAL decline during the lockdown are warranted. Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2021;34(2):151-63.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.13075/ijomeh.1896.01733DOI Listing
May 2021

Parental and Familial Factors Influencing Physical Activity Levels in Early Adolescence: A Prospective Study.

Healthcare (Basel) 2020 Dec 2;8(4). Epub 2020 Dec 2.

Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, 21000 Split, Croatia.

Parental/familial factors are important determinants of the physical activity level (PAL) in children and adolescents, but studies rarely prospectively evaluate their relationships. This study aimed to evaluate the changes in physical activity levels among adolescents from Bosnia and Herzegovina over a two-year period and to determine parental/familial predictors of PAL in early adolescence. A total of 651 participants (50.3% females) were tested at baseline (beginning of high school education; 14 years old on average) and at follow-up (approximately 20 months later). The predictors included sociodemographic characteristics (age, gender) and parental/familial factors (socioeconomic status of the family, maternal and paternal education, conflict with parents, parental absence from home, parental questioning, and parental monitoring). Physical activity levels were evidenced by the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents (PAQ-A; criterion). Boys were more active than girls, both at baseline (-test = 3.09, < 0.001) and at follow-up (-test = 3.4, < 0.001). Physical activity level decreased over the observed two-year period (-test = 16.89, < 0.001), especially in boys, which is probably a consequence of drop-out from the sport in this period. Logistic regression evidenced parental education as a positive predictor of physical activity level at baseline (OR [95% CI]; 1.38 [1.15-170], 1.35 [1.10-1.65]), and at follow-up (1.35 [1.11-1.69], 1.29 [1.09-1.59], for maternal and paternal education, respectively). Parents with a higher level of education are probably more informed about the importance of physical activity on health status, and thus transfer this information to their children as well. The age from 14 to 16 years is likely a critical period for maintaining physical activity levels in boys, while further studies of a younger age are necessary to evaluate the dynamics of changes in physical activity levels for girls. For maintaining physical activity levels in adolescence, special attention should be paid to children whose parents are less educated, and to inform them of the benefits of an appropriate physical activity level and its necessity for maintaining proper health and growth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040532DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7761556PMC
December 2020

Reliability, Validity and Usefulness of a New Response Time Test for Agility-Based Sports: A Simple vs. Complex Motor Task.

J Sports Sci Med 2019 12 19;18(4):623-635. Epub 2019 Nov 19.

Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Split, Croatia.

The importance of response time (RT) in sports is well known, but there is an evident lack of reliable and valid sport-specific measurement tools applicable in the evaluation of RT in trained athletes. This study aimed to identify the validity, reliability, and usefulness of four newly developed RT testing protocols among athletes from agility-saturated (AG) and non-agility-saturated (NAG) sports. Thirty-seven AG and ten NAG athletes (age: 20.9 ± 2.9; eleven females) volunteered to undergo: three randomized simple response time (SRT-1, SRT-2, and SRT-3) protocols that included a single limb movement, and one complex response time (CRT) protocol that included multi joint movements and whole body transition over a short distance (1.5 and 1.8m). Each RT test involved 3 trials with 5 randomized attempts per trial. Two sensors were placed at the left- and right-hand side for SRT-1 and SRT-2. Three sensors were positioned (left, middle, right) in SRT-3 and CRT. The intra-class-correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated as a measure of reliability. Independent sample t-test, effect size (d), and area-under-the-curve (AUC) were calculated to define discriminative validity of the tests. The results showed the newly developed tests were more reliable and useful in the AG than NAG athletes (i.e., ICC between 0.68 and 0.97 versus 0.31-0.90, respectively). The RT of AG athletes was faster than that of NAG athletes in the CRT test from the left (p <0.01, = 2.40, AUC: 0.98), centre (p < 0.01, = 1.57, AUC: 0.89), and right sensor (p < 0.01, = 1.93, AUC: 0.89) locations. In contrast, there were no differences between the groups in the SRT tests. The weak correlation (i.e., r= 0.00-0.33) between the SRT and CRT tests suggests that response time of the single limb and multijoint limb movements should not be considered as a single motor capacity. In conclusion, this study showed that AG athletes had faster response time than their NAG peers during complex motor tasks. Such enhanced ability to rapidly and accurately reprogram complex motor tasks can be considered one of the essential qualities required for advanced performance in agility-based sports.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6873124PMC
December 2019

Association Between Conditioning Capacities and Shooting Performance in Professional Basketball Players: An Analysis of Stationary and Dynamic Shooting Skills.

J Strength Cond Res 2018 Jul;32(7):1981-1992

Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Split, Croatia.

Pojskic, H, Sisic, N, Separovic, V, and Sekulic, D. Association between conditioning capacities and shooting performance in professional basketball players: an analysis of stationary and dynamic shooting skills. J Strength Cond Res 32(7): 1981-1992, 2018-Little is known about the influence of conditioning capacities on shooting performance in basketball. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between different conditioning capacities and shooting performance in professional basketball players. In this investigation, we examined 38 males (all perimeter players; height: 185.5 ± 6.73 cm; mass: 78.66 ± 10.35 kg). Conditioning capacities were evaluated by tests of muscular strength, aerobic endurance, jumping and throwing capacities, sprinting speed, preplanned agility, anaerobic endurance, and fatigue resistance. Shooting performance was evaluated using game statistics, as well as 6 tests of shooting performance performed in controlled settings: (a) 3 tests of static (i.e., nonfatigued) shooting performance (standardized execution of 1- [S1], 2- [S2] and 3-point shots [S3] in stationary conditions), and (b) 3 tests of dynamic (i.e., fatigued) shooting performance (standardized execution of 1- [D1], 2- (D2), and 3-point shots [D3] in dynamic conditions). All 3 dynamic shooting tests and the S1 test were significantly (p ≤ 0.05) correlated with corresponding game statistics. Multiple regression indicated that conditioning capacities were significantly related to D1 (R = 0.36; p = 0.03), D2 (R = 0.44; p = 0.03), S3 (R = 0.41; p = 0.02), and D3 (R = 0.39; p = 0.03) tests. Players with a higher fatigue resistance achieved better results on the D1 test (β = -0.37, p = 0.03). Preplanned agility (β = -0.33, p = 0.04), countermovement jump (β = 0.42, p = 0.03), and fatigue resistance (β = -0.37, p = 0.02) were significant predictors of D2 performance. The countermovement jump (β = 0.39, p = 0.04), medicine ball toss (β = 0.34, p = 0.04), and anaerobic endurance (β = 0.46, p = 0.04) predicted the results of D3 performance. Jumping, throwing, and anaerobic endurance capacities were good determinants of the skill of dynamic shooting over a long distance. These findings emphasize the importance of explosive power and anaerobic capacity as determinants of shooting performance in high-level basketball players.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000002100DOI Listing
July 2018

Positional Role Differences in the Aerobic and Anaerobic Power of Elite Basketball Players.

J Hum Kinet 2015 Dec 30;49:219-27. Epub 2015 Dec 30.

Tuzla University, School of Physical Education and Sport, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The aim of the present study was to compare the aerobic and anaerobic power and capacity of elite male basketball players who played multiple positions. Fifty-five healthy players were divided into the following three different subsamples according to their positional role: guards (n = 22), forwards (n = 19) and centers (n = 14). The following three tests were applied to estimate their aerobic and anaerobic power and capacities: the countermovement jump (CMJ), a multistage shuttle run test and the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST). The obtained data were used to calculate the players' aerobic and anaerobic power and capacities. To determine the possible differences between the subjects considering their different positions on the court, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the Bonferroni post-hoc test for multiple comparisons was used. The results showed that there was a significant difference between the different groups of players in eleven out of sixteen measured variables. Guards and forwards exhibited greater aerobic and relative values of anaerobic power, allowing shorter recovery times and the ability to repeat high intensity, basketball-specific activities. Centers presented greater values of absolute anaerobic power and capacities, permitting greater force production during discrete tasks. Coaches can use these data to create more individualized strength and conditioning programs for different positional roles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/hukin-2015-0124DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4723171PMC
December 2015
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