Vladimir Mulens-Arias, PhD - Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia - Postdoctoral researcher

Vladimir Mulens-Arias

PhD

Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia

Postdoctoral researcher

Barcelona | Spain

Main Specialties: Biotechnology

Additional Specialties: Nanomedicine

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-3549-0700


Top Author

Vladimir Mulens-Arias, PhD - Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia - Postdoctoral researcher

Vladimir Mulens-Arias

PhD

Introduction

Graduated from Havana University in 2006, I have developed abilities in cancer & cancer immunology & immunotherapy research throughout my entire work and academic experiences in the past 12 years. Working in tight relation with clinicians, I monitored the vaccine-induced immune response and tumor biology of cancer patients enrolled in variety clinical trials. Concomitantly, I have got trained in many immunological techniques and clinical trials procedures along with an exhaustive cancer & tumor immunology theoretical learning due to frequent seminars and workshops.
The involvement in clinical trial studies endowed me with communication skills enough to conduct independent and cooperative research. As part of my work, I headed for several months the laboratory I was working at, and, was the organizer of the First International Workshop on Clinical Cancer Immunotherapy in Havana, November 2009, under the auspices of UICC. Since January 2011, I worked during a PhD program (UAM-La Caixa International PhD Program) in cancer nanotechnology at National Center for Biotechnology where I consolidated my research skills applied to the development of new cancer-targeted gene therapy, specifically, magnetic nanoparticle-based gene therapy. I consistently studied the interaction of nanomaterials with reticulo-endothelial system and tumor cells, providing new knowledge on the field. During this period, I learned a wide variety of techniques including chemical synthesis, chemical and physical characterization of nanoparticles, cell culture, biochemical assays, molecular biology (qRT-PCR, immunoassays, gene silencing, gene expression, etc.), and cell biology (confocal microscopy). As a result, more than 5 publications were published from the projects I worked in. Granted with an international postdoctoral scholarship from ARC Fondation (France), I worked on the application of biogenic extracellular vesicles and nanoghosts in cancer theranosis as well as in the development of plasmonic nanoparticle-based nanoplatforms for cancer Imaging and therapy, a cutting-edge, exciting and fast-growing field. I was granted in 2018 with a cofund postdoctoral fellowship BEST (Marie Curie-Severo Ochoa Actions) at the Institute of Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC). I was also granted with a postdoctoral fellowship Juan de la Cierva-Incorporación (2017) to work at National Center for Biotechnology.
Throughout my career, I have authored 16 scientific papers, 9 of them as first author ( https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3549-0700; ResearcherID: G-4531-2017 )
Google Scholar: 328 citations for an H index of 7, i10 index of 6
Scopus: Articles with citations (8), Average citations per Article (20.38), h-index (6)
Reviewer activity (https://publons.com/author/1212641/vladimir-mulens-arias-phd#profile): 2016 (3), 2017 (5), 2018 (22), and 2019 (4) for Journal: International Journal of Nanomedicine (Dove Medical Press, Journal Impact Factor: 4.300) & Advanced Drugs Delivery Reviews (ELSEVIER, Journal Impact Factor: 13.66)

Primary Affiliation: Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia - Barcelona , Spain

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:


View Vladimir Mulens-Arias’s Resume / CV

Education

Feb 2011 - Jun 2015
Autonomous University of Madrid/National Center for Biotechnology
PhD
Molecular and Cell Biology/Immunology & Oncology
Oct 2011 - Jun 2012
Autonomous University of Madrid
MSc
Molecular and Cell Biology
Sep 2001 - Jul 2006
Havana University
Bachelor in Science
Biochemistry

Experience

Oct 2015 - Sep 2018
Matière et Systèmes Complexes
Postdoctoral Researcher
Feb 2011 - Jan 2015
National Center for Biotechnology
PhD Student Researcher
Immunology & Oncology
Sep 2006 - Jul 2010
Center for Molecular Immunology
Researcher
Clinical Investigation
Dec 2018
Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia
Postdoctoral researcher
Targeted therapeutics and nanodevices

Publications

13Publications

260Reads

47Profile Views

Polyethyleneimine-assisted one-pot synthesis of quasi-fractal plasmonic gold nanocomposites as a photothermal theranostic agent

Nanoscale, 2019, DOI: 10.1039/C8NR09849B

Nanoscale

Gold nanoparticles have been thoroughly used in designing thermal ablative therapies and photoacoustic imag-ing for cancer owing to their unique and tunable plasmonic properties. While plasmonic properties highly depend on size and structure, controllable aggregation of gold nanoparticles can trigger a plasmonic coupling of adjacent electronic clouds, henceforth leading to an increase of light absorption within the near-infrared (NIR) window. Polymer-engraftment of gold nanoparticles has been investigated to obtain plasmonic coupling phenomenon, but complex chemical steps are often needed to accomplish a biomedically relevant product. An appealing and con-trollable manner to achieve polymer-based plasmon coupling is a template-assisted Au+3 reduction, that ensures in situ gold reduction and coalescence. Among the polymers exploited as reducing agents are polyethylene-imines (PEI). In this study, we addressed the PEI-assisted synthesis of gold nanoparticles and their further ag-gregation to obtain fractal NIR-absorbent plasmonic nanoaggregates for photothermal therapy and photoacous-tic imaging of colorectal cancer. PEI-assisted Au+3 reduction was followed up by UV-visible light absorption, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and photo-thermal conversion. Reaction kinetic, stability, and photother-mal plasmonic properties of as-synthesized nanocomposites tightly depended on PEI:Au ratio. We defined a PEI-Au ratio range (2.5-5) for one-pot synthesis of gold nanoparticles that self-arrange into fractal nanoaggre-gates with demonstrated photo-thermal therapeutic and imaging efficiency both in vitro and in vivo in a colorectal carcinoma (CRC) animal model.

View Article
January 2019

Impact Factor 7.233

2 Reads

Extracellular vesicles for personalized medicine: The input of physically triggered production, loading and theranostic properties.

Adv Drug Deliv Rev 2018 Dec 13. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Laboratoire Matière et Systèmes Complexes, UMR 7057, CNRS, Université Paris Diderot, 10 rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, Paris 75205, France. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.addr.2018.12.009DOI Listing
December 2018
17 Reads
15.038 Impact Factor

Disturbance of adhesomes by gold nanoparticles reveals a size- and cell type-bias.

Biomater Sci 2018 Dec;7(1):389-408

Laboratoire Matière et Systèmes Complexes (MSC), UMR 7075, CNRS and Université Paris Diderot, Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (USPC), 10 Rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13, France.

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http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=C8BM01267A
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8bm01267aDOI Listing
December 2018
12 Reads

Theranostic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Cargo Defines Extracellular Vesicle‐Dependent Modulation of Macrophage Activation and Migratory Behavior

Advanced Biosystems

Cells shed submicronic extracellular vesicles (EVs), containing a variety of soluble and membrane‐embedded factors, to mediate intercellular communication. EVs show differential immunomodulatory features depending on the cell source and physiological status, endowing these nanosystems with intrinsic immunotherapeutic potential. EVs could be used to mount a potent immune response against tumor cells, by regulating inflammatory cues in tumors and modulating macrophage activation and migratory behavior. On the other part, EVs are loaded with theranostic nanoparticles, such as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), to confer them magnetic detection, manipulation, and heating capabilities. However, little is known about the impact that SPION may have on intrinsic immunomodulatory properties of EVs. Here, the effects are characterized on the activation and dynamics of macrophages induced by EVs derived from mouse mesenchymal stem cells and mouse/human endothelial cells, loaded or not with SPION. EVs differently activate macrophages as determined by cytokine secretion, phagocytosis capacity, migratory behavior, and extracellular matrix degradation capacity. SPION loading prove to amplify the immunoregulatory properties of EVs, increasing the macrophage ability to migrate, and degrade extracellular matrix. Altogether, EVs might potentiate natural or induced immune response by modulating macrophage activation/migratory behavior, suggesting their use as nanocarriers in combinatorial therapeutic approaches with SPION.

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July 2018
1 Read

Immunologic Response Elicited in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving a NeuGcGM3-based Vaccine as Adjuvant Therapy.

J Immunother 2017 10;40(8):289-301

*Center of Molecular Immunology †National Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology, Havana, Cuba.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CJI.0000000000000175DOI Listing
October 2017
23 Reads
4.008 Impact Factor

PI3K p85 β regulatory subunit deficiency does not affect NK cell differentiation and increases NKG2D-mediated activation.

J Leukoc Biol 2016 12 5;100(6):1285-1296. Epub 2016 Jul 5.

Department of Immunology and Oncology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología/CSIC, Madrid, Spain

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1189/jlb.1A1215-541RRDOI Listing
December 2016
8 Reads
4.289 Impact Factor

Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle uptake alters M2 macrophage phenotype, iron metabolism, migration and invasion.

Nanomedicine 2016 May 28;12(4):1127-1138. Epub 2015 Dec 28.

Department of Immunology and Oncology and Nanobiomedicine Initiative, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CNB-CSIC), Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nano.2015.11.020DOI Listing
May 2016
18 Reads
6.155 Impact Factor

Polyethylenimine-coated SPION exhibits potential intrinsic anti-metastatic properties inhibiting migration and invasion of pancreatic tumor cells.

J Control Release 2015 Oct 8;216:78-92. Epub 2015 Aug 8.

Department of Immunology and Oncology and NanoBiomedicine Initiative, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CNB)/CSIC, Darwin 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jconrel.2015.08.009DOI Listing
October 2015
16 Reads
7.705 Impact Factor

Polyethylenimine-coated SPIONs trigger macrophage activation through TLR-4 signaling and ROS production and modulate podosome dynamics.

Biomaterials 2015 Jun 18;52:494-506. Epub 2015 Mar 18.

Department of Immunology and Oncology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CNB)/CSIC, Darwin 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain; NanoBiomedicine Initiative, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CNB)/CSIC, Darwin 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2015.02.068DOI Listing
June 2015
18 Reads
8.557 Impact Factor

NKG2D ligand overexpression in lupus nephritis correlates with increased NK cell activity and differentiation in kidneys but not in the periphery.

J Leukoc Biol 2015 Mar 12;97(3):583-98. Epub 2015 Jan 12.

*Department of Immunology and Oncology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid, Spain; and Department of Immunology and Pathology, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria-Fundación Jiménez Díaz-Universidad Autónoma Madrid, Spain

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1189/jlb.4A0714-326RDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5477896PMC
March 2015
12 Reads
4.289 Impact Factor

PI3K p110δ is expressed by gp38(-)CD31(+) and gp38(+)CD31(+) spleen stromal cells and regulates their CCL19, CCL21, and LTβR mRNA levels.

PLoS One 2013 29;8(8):e72960. Epub 2013 Aug 29.

Department of Immunology and Oncology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid, Spain.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0072960PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3757018PMC
April 2014
12 Reads
3.234 Impact Factor

Top co-authors

Domingo F Barber
Domingo F Barber

Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CNB)/CSIC

6
Jose M Rojas
Jose M Rojas

Unidad de Biología Celular

4
Tania Crombet
Tania Crombet

Hermanos Ameijeiras Hospital

3
Roberto Spada
Roberto Spada

Centro Nacional de Biotecnología/CSIC

3
Carmen Viada
Carmen Viada

Center of Molecular Immnunology

2
Zaima Mazorra
Zaima Mazorra

University Hospital

2
Florence Gazeau
Florence Gazeau

CNRS and Université Paris Diderot

2