Publications by authors named "Vladimír Adamec"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The presence of fine and ultrafine particulate matter in the work environment.

Cent Eur J Public Health 2020 10;28 Suppl:S31-S36

Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.

This study presents the results of pilot measurement, where the exposure of fine and ultrafine particulate matter was monitored. The measurement was performed in welding workplace, where these particles are produced unintentionally. The measurement consisted of collecting information and measuring the concentration of particles in the workplace, where data collection was focused only on inhalation exposure. During welding, primarily 300 nm size particles are produced, and their concentration is strongly influenced by the welding material, type of welding and suction. The particles are amorphous in terms of morphology and contain manganese, iron and silicon, which can cause neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, the results indicate the importance of monitoring oral exposure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21101/cejph.a6174DOI Listing
October 2020

Levels and Health Risk Assessment of PM Aerosol in Brno, Czech Republic.

Cent Eur J Public Health 2017 06;25(2):129-134

Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic.

Objective: The main effort of this work was to evaluate the situation of the atmosphere in selected regions of Brno during the years 2009-2013 and to estimate health risks which might come up due to the increased concentrations of airborne particulate matter.

Methods: PM samples were collected in four areas varying in degree of automobile traffic using automatic and gravimetric sampling methods. PM concentrations were assessed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Health risks were estimated based on calculation of relative risks and population for four health endpoints. The selected health outcomes were premature mortality, cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, and chronic bronchitis.

Results: The highest PM concentrations were measured in two regions with high traffic loads T1, T2 and background region B2. The values were 34.33 ± 11.52 µg·m in 2010, 34.87 ± 12.03 µg·m in 2013 and 34.52 ± 8.81 µg·m in 2009, respectively. The highest correlation was between T1 and T2 having Spearman's correlation coefficient 0.888 followed by T1-B1 pair with coefficient 0.886. For all health outcomes, the highest health effect of PM (E) was determined for T2 site in 2010 which was 48 ± 14, 49 ± 21, 44 ± 19 and 24 ± 10 for premature mortality, cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, and chronic bronchitis, respectively.

Conclusion: The concentrations are highly correlated, especially in traffic regions. The annual concentrations did not exceed the legislation limit but 24-hours limit was exceeded more than two times in several cases. The highest number of cases with a given health outcome was estimated in traffic regions especially for cardiovascular disease and premature mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21101/cejph.a4495DOI Listing
June 2017

Levels, sources, and health risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Brno, Czech Republic: a 5-year study.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2016 Oct 26;23(20):20462-20473. Epub 2016 Jul 26.

Czech Hydrometeorological Institute, Brno Regional Office, Kroftova 2578/43, 616 67, Brno, Czech Republic.

This work aimed to determine the seasonal variations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in airborne PM at two background sites (Masná-MS, Líšeň-LN) in Brno over a 5-year period (2009-2013). Samples were collected on quartz filters using a low-volume sampler by continual filtration. Concentrations of PAHs in collected PM samples were determined using a gas chromatography with a mass spectrometer as a detector. A different number of PAHs were determined to be at each site, i.e., 11 PAHs at the MS site and six PAHs at the LN site, and similarities between them were identified using non-parametric analysis of variance. Potential sources were identified using principal component analysis (PCA) and PAHs diagnostic ratios. The work also focused on health risk assessment. This was estimated using toxic equivalent factors to calculate individual lifetime cancer risk, which quantifies risk of exposure to PAHs for specific age groups. The average 11-PAH concentrations in M|S site annually ranged from 19.28 ± 19.02 ng m (2011) to 40.37 ± 21.35 ng m (2013). With regard to the LN site, the average six-PAH concentrations annually ranged from 3.64 ± 3.87 ng m (2009) and 5.27 ± 6.19 ng m (2012). PCA and diagnostic ratios indicate the main sources to be traffic emissions and coal combustion. Health risk assessment showed carcinogenic risk under limit value in all cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-016-7172-5DOI Listing
October 2016

Dissolution kinetics of Pd and Pt from automobile catalysts by naturally occurring complexing agents.

J Hazard Mater 2011 Dec 21;198:331-9. Epub 2011 Oct 21.

Laboratories of the Geological Institutes, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.

Powder samples prepared from gasoline (Pt, Pd, Rh, new GN/old GO) and diesel (Pt, new DN/old DO) catalysts and recycled catalyst NIST 2556 were tested using kinetic leaching experiments following 1, 12, 24, 48, 168, 360, 720 and 1440-h interactions with solutions of 20mM citric acid (CA), 20 mM Na(2)P(4)O(7) (NaPyr), 1 g L(-1) NaCl (NaCl), a fulvic acid solution (FA-DOC 50 mg L(-1)) and 20 mM CA at pH 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9. The mobilisation of platinum group elements (PGEs) was fastest in solutions of CA and NaPyr. In the other interactions (NaCl, FA), the release of PGEs was probably followed by immobilisation processes, and the interactions were not found to correspond to the simple release of PGEs into solution. Because of their low concentrations, the individual complexing agents did not have any effect on the speciation of Pd and Pt in the extracts; both metals are present in solution as the complexes Me(OH)(2), Me(OH)(+). Immobilisation can take place through the adsorption of the positively charged hydroxyl complexes or flocculation of fulvic acid, complexing the PGEs on the surface of the extracted catalysts. The calculated normalised bulk released NRi values are similar to the reaction rate highest in the solutions of CA and NaPyr.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2011.10.051DOI Listing
December 2011