Publications by authors named "Viviana Rena"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Biological kinship in 750 year old human remains from Central Argentina with signs of interpersonal violence.

Forensic Sci Med Pathol 2020 12 11;16(4):649-658. Epub 2020 Sep 11.

Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Facultad de Filosofía y Humanidades, Departamento de Antropología. CONICET, Instituto de Antropología de Córdoba (IDACOR), Av. Hipólito Yrigoyen 174, 5000, Córdoba, Argentina.

Human skeletal remains of an adult male (20-24 years old) and a juvenile (4-8 years old), dated to 750 ± 85 C years BP, were found on the southern margin of Mar Chiquita Lagoon (Córdoba, Argentina). Both individuals show signs of being victims of interpersonal violence, with arrowheads associated with the remains and perimortem lesions on the juvenile, as well as an unusual form of burial, with the juvenile partially overlapped with the adult. The aim of this work is to study a possible kin relationship between these two individuals through ancient DNA analysis. Biological kinship was evaluated by autosomal and Y-chromosome STR (short tandem repeat) typing, PCR-APLP for SNP determination and hypervariable region I sequencing of the mitochondrial DNA. Genetic analyses indicated that these individuals shared the same Y-chromosomal haplotype but different mitochondrial lineages. The likelihood ratio based on autosomal loci indicates that the genetic profiles of the human remains would be more likely to be that indicating a father-son bond. The paleogenetic approach combined with forensic genetic methods applied to this study allowed us to confirm a hypothesis that originated in bioarchaeological evidence. This study constitutes a unique case in Argentina of kinship determination based on DNA profiles of human remains in an archaeological context of interpersonal violence. It is important to highlight the contribution made by these studies to address topics usually hidden in bioarchaeological studies, such as community organization, cultural customs and mortuary practices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12024-020-00296-3DOI Listing
December 2020

The Lipid Transfer Protein StarD7: Structure, Function, and Regulation.

Int J Mol Sci 2013 Mar 18;14(3):6170-86. Epub 2013 Mar 18.

Universidad Nacional de Córdoba-Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Departamento de Bioquímica Clínica-Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquímica Clínica e Inmunología, X5000HUA Córdoba, Argentina.

The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein-related lipid transfer (START) domain proteins constitute a family of evolutionarily conserved and widely expressed proteins that have been implicated in lipid transport, metabolism, and signaling. The 15 well-characterized mammalian START domain-containing proteins are grouped into six subfamilies. The START domain containing 7 mRNA encodes StarD7, a member of the StarD2/phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PCTP) subfamily, which was first identified as a gene overexpressed in a choriocarcinoma cell line. Recent studies show that the StarD7 protein facilitates the delivery of phosphatidylcholine to the mitochondria. This review summarizes the latest advances in StarD7 research, focusing on the structural and biochemical features, protein-lipid interactions, and mechanisms that regulate StarD7 expression. The implications of the role of StarD7 in cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation are also discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms14036170DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3634439PMC
March 2013

StarD7 knockdown modulates ABCG2 expression, cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation of human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cells.

PLoS One 2012 29;7(8):e44152. Epub 2012 Aug 29.

Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquímica Clínica e Inmunología-Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Departamento de Bioquímica Clínica, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina.

Background: StAR-related lipid transfer domain containing 7 (StarD7) is a member of the START-domain protein family whose function still remains unclear. Our data from an explorative microarray assay performed with mRNAs from StarD7 siRNA-transfected JEG-3 cells indicated that ABCG2 (ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2) was one of the most abundantly downregulated mRNAs.

Methodology/principal Findings: Here, we have confirmed that knocking down StarD7 mRNA lead to a decrease in the xenobiotic/lipid transporter ABCG2 at both the mRNA and protein levels (-26.4% and -41%, p<0.05, at 48 h of culture, respectively). Also a concomitant reduction in phospholipid synthesis, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake and (3)H-thymidine incorporation was detected. Wound healing and transwell assays revealed that JEG-3 cell migration was significantly diminished (p<0.05). Conversely, biochemical differentiation markers such as human chorionic gonadotrophin β-subunit (βhCG) protein synthesis and secretion as well as βhCG and syncytin-1 mRNAs were increased approximately 2-fold. In addition, desmoplakin immunostaining suggested that there was a reduction of intercellular desmosomes between adjacent JEG-3 cells after knocking down StarD7.

Conclusions/significance: Altogether these findings provide evidence for a role of StarD7 in cell physiology indicating that StarD7 modulates ABCG2 multidrug transporter level, cell migration, proliferation, and biochemical and morphological differentiation marker expression in a human trophoblast cell model.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0044152PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3430668PMC
February 2013

Effects of the organophosphate insecticides phosmet and chlorpyrifos on trophoblast JEG-3 cell death, proliferation and inflammatory molecule production.

Toxicol In Vitro 2012 Apr 12;26(3):406-13. Epub 2012 Jan 12.

IDEPA-CONICET, LIBIQUIMA, Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén, Argentina.

Epidemiological data have associated environmental organophosphate insecticide (OP) exposure during pregnancy with fetal growth deficits. To better understand OP injury that may adversely affect pregnancy, we used the JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cell line, which provide a recognized in vitro model to study placental function. The effects of the OP phosmet (Pm) and chlorpyrifos (Cp) on JEG-3 cells viability, proliferation, cell cycle and inflammatory molecule production were evaluated. Both insecticides affected cellular viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, inducing apoptosis and decreasing [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation. However, only Pm reduced DNA synthesis independently of cellular death and decreased the cell percentage at the S-phase. Unlike apoptosis, TNFα production varied with the concentration tested, suggesting that other TNFα independent mechanisms might trigger cell death. No induction of the inflammatory molecule nitric oxide was detected. The mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory IL-6, IL-17 and the anti-inflammatory IL-13 cytokines were differentially modulated. These findings show that Pm and Cp generate a specific toxicity signature, altering cell viability and inducing an inflammatory cytokine profile, suggesting that trophoblasts may represent a possible target for OP adverse effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tiv.2012.01.003DOI Listing
April 2012

StarD7 gene expression in trophoblast cells: contribution of SF-1 and Wnt-beta-catenin signaling.

Mol Endocrinol 2011 Aug 26;25(8):1364-75. Epub 2011 May 26.

Universidad Nacional de Córdoba-Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Departamento de Bioquímica Clínica-Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquímica Clínica e Inmunología, X5000HUA Córdoba, Argentina.

Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer domain containing 7 (StarD7) is a poorly characterized member of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer proteins, up-regulated in JEG-3 cells, involved in intracellular transport and metabolism of lipids. Previous studies dealing with the mechanisms underlying the human StarD7 gene expression led us to define the cis-acting regulatory sequences in the StarD7 promoter using as a model JEG-3 cells. These include a functional T cell-specific transcription factor 4 (TCF4) site involved in Wnt-β-catenin signaling. To understand these mechanisms in more depth, we examined the steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) contribution to StarD7 expression. Cotransfection experiments in JEG-3 cells point out that the StarD7 promoter is activated by SF-1, and this effect is increased by forskolin. EMSA using JEG-3 nuclear proteins demonstrated that SF-1 binds to the StarD7 promoter. Additionally, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that SF-1 and β-catenin are bound in vivo to the StarD7 promoter. Reporter gene assays in combination with mutations in the SF-1 and TCF4 binding sites revealed that the StarD7 promoter is synergistically activated by SF-1 and β-catenin and that the TCF4 binding site (-614/-608) plays an important role in this activation. SF-1 amino acid mutations involved in the physical interaction with β-catenin abolished this activation; thus demonstrating that the contact between the two proteins is necessary for an efficient StarD7 transcriptional induction. Finally, these data suggest that β-catenin could function as a bridge between SF-1 and TCF4 forming a ternary complex, which would stimulate StarD7 expression. The SF-1 and β-catenin pathway convergence on StarD7 expression may have important implications in the phospholipid uptake and transport, contributing to the normal trophoblast development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/me.2010-0503DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5417238PMC
August 2011