Publications by authors named "Vito C Quatela"

27 Publications

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Evaluating the effectiveness and safety of radiofrequency for face and neck rejuvenation: A systematic review.

Lasers Surg Med 2022 01 19;54(1):27-45. Epub 2021 Dec 19.

Quatela Center for Plastic Surgery, Rochester, New York, USA.

Background: Radiofrequency technology has emerged as a treatment for aesthetic rejuvenation.

Objective: To examine radiofrequency for facial and neck rejuvenation, clinical studies were assessed on effectiveness and safety of radiofrequency for acne, acne scars, and facial aging by subjective and objective measures.

Methods: A systematic literature review was performed. Eligibility criteria included articles in English, primary literature, clinical or ex vivo studies, use of radiofrequency, and face or neck treatment. Ablative techniques, home-use devices, combined modalities, and studies unrelated to rejuvenation were excluded. All studies were appraised for quality and biases.

Results: We identified 121 articles. Radiofrequency effectively treated acne by reducing sebum levels and lesion count and improving acne scars. Radiofrequency demonstrated a volumetric reduction in facial fat, and improved skin laxity, elasticity, and global skin aesthetic. Patient satisfaction was higher for those desiring modest rejuvenation. There were histological changes consistent with repair response, neocollagenesis, and neoelastinogenesis. Radiofrequency was safe apart from one patient who developed a neck fistula.

Conclusion: Most studies demonstrated radiofrequency treatment of acne, scars, or facial rhytids had positive subjective improvement ratings. Objective studies demonstrated reduction of acne, decreased scarring, lifting effect, improvement in elasticity and collagen, volumetric fat changes, and wrinkle reduction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lsm.23506DOI Listing
January 2022

The Selection of Facelift Approach on the Basis of Midfacial Ptosis.

Facial Plast Surg 2021 Apr 3;37(2):149-159. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

PLLC-Otolaryngology Division, Rochester, New York.

Facial aging in the midface has been described to encompass both soft tissue descent and volumetric change. Currently, there is no established and widely accepted grading system for midfacial ptosis. We propose a simplified grading system for midfacial ptosis ranging from mild to severe in terms of Grades I through III. Using this classification system, we describe an algorithm to help select the facelift approach most appropriate for each patient. The sub-superficial musculoaponeurotic system rhytidectomy, deep plane rhytidectomy, and subperiosteal midface lift techniques are described in detail. The nuances of the selection process also include a discussion on the various approaches to the orbital fat, namely a transconjunctival lower lid blepharoplasty with skin pinch versus a lower lid blepharoplasty with fat transposition, as well as the aging neck. Furthermore, we integrate the addition of postoperative adjunctive procedures which include injectables, chemical peels, and dermabrasion to address facial rejuvenation from not only a gravitational aspect but also the volumetric and textural components.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1725105DOI Listing
April 2021

Endoscopic Browplasty.

Facial Plast Surg 2018 Apr 9;34(2):139-144. Epub 2018 Apr 9.

Lindsay House Surgery Center for Plastic Surgery, Rochester, New York.

The endoscopic brow lift has become an established procedure that can safely and reliably rejuvenate the upper third of the face. The authors discuss relevant anatomy and considerations for patient selection to optimize surgical outcomes. A detailed review of surgical technique is presented, and the potential complications and means to reduce them are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0038-1637728DOI Listing
April 2018

Surgical Anatomy of the Upper Face and Forehead.

Facial Plast Surg 2018 Apr 9;34(2):109-113. Epub 2018 Apr 9.

Otolaryngology Division, Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, The Permanente Medical Group, Oakland, California.

Aesthetic ideals regarding proportion and balance of the face have existed for centuries. The upper third of the face, including the brow, forehead, and temple, provides an important contribution to the overall facial aesthetic. This is especially true given how the brow frames the eyes, and the eyes serve as the key focal point in our interactions with others. There exists a variety of surgical and nonsurgical procedures aimed at improving the aesthetic of the upper portion of the face, and a thorough knowledge of the surgical anatomy of the upper face and forehead is critical to their successful execution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0038-1637727DOI Listing
April 2018

Effects of the Tongue-in-Groove Maneuver on Nasal Tip Rotation.

Aesthet Surg J 2018 Sep;38(10):1065-1073

Background: A change in nasal tip rotation is a very common maneuver performed during rhinoplasty. Among the many techniques used to achieve this goal is the tongue-in-groove (TIG).

Objectives: This study addresses the long-term effect of the TIG on the nasal tip rotation 1 year after rhinoplasty.

Methods: The authors prospectively identified patients who were submitted to a rhinoplasty with a TIG maneuver over a period of 1 year. The angle of rotation was measured along the nostril axis angle. The data were analyzed using the t test and a linear regression model.

Results: Seventeen patients were included. The average preoperative tip rotation was 93.95° (SD, 3.12°). Immediate postoperative tip rotation averaged 114.47° (SD, 3.79°). At the 1-year follow-up appointment, the tip rotation averaged 106.55° (SD, 3.54°). There was a significant loss of rotation at the 1-year postoperative visit (P < 0.0001), with an average loss of 7.9° (SD, 3.25°), which amounted to 6.8%. The preoperative rotation didn't affect the amount of loss of rotation (P = 0.04). It can be estimated that, for every degree of rotation that is changed at surgery, the tip can be expected to lose 0.35 degrees over the first year.

Conclusions: TIG is a more dependable technique than the ones that rely on healing and contraction to obtain rotation. Our data demonstrated a significant loss of rotation during the first year. This suggests that the surgeon needs to slightly overcorrect the tip rotation to account for this loss.

Level Of Evidence 4:
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/asj/sjy078DOI Listing
September 2018

Transtemporal midface lifting to blend the lower eyelid-cheek junction.

Clin Plast Surg 2015 Jan;42(1):103-14

Marcelo Antunes Center for Facial Plastic Surgery, 3807 Spicewwod Springs Road, Suite 201, Austin, TX 78759, USA.

When examining the results of this technique, improvement is noticed in the infraorbital hollowing, midface tissue ptosis, depth of nasolabial folds, and degree of jowling. The greatest overall improvement is the extent of midface ptosis and infraorbital hollowing at the lower eyelid-cheek junction followed by improvement in the nasolabial region. Improvement in jowling was common but less significant than the improvement of the midface structures. The authors think that this dramatic improvement is owing to multiple factors. With wide and complete release of the central and lateral midfacial structures, the en bloc suspension of the SOOF and malar fat pad is thoroughly accomplished. Unlike other midfacial techniques, the transtemporal midface achieves pull in 2 vectors, directing the repositioning of tissuesboth superiorly and laterally. The superior vector repositions the SOOF and malar fat pad over the bony infraorbital rim and malar/zygomatic complex, whereas the lateral pull effaces the nasolabialfold. This superior vector more accurately reverses the forces of aging displayed on the ptotic midface. Lastly, although this technique is not designed primarily to eliminate jowling at the mandible, it has been noted that elevation of 1.0 to 1.5 cm of skin overlying the mandible is typical. Although the endoscopic forehead midface lift is not without its complications or pitfalls, all of these can be minimized, easily managed, or avoided completely through the intraoperative techniques and postoperative care. Careful and deliberate preoperative counseling of patients regarding the possible bumps in the road to recovery is critical. By using the techniques available to limit and manage complications and setting appropriate patient expectations should these complications occur, the endoscopic forehead midface lift can become an extremely powerful and safe technique in the facial cosmetic surgeon’s armamentarium to efface the lid-cheek junction with a high degree of patient satisfaction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cps.2014.08.003DOI Listing
January 2015

Endoscopic-assisted facelifting.

Facial Plast Surg 2014 Aug 30;30(4):413-21. Epub 2014 Jul 30.

Devenir Aesthetics, Austin, Texas.

Over the past two decades the use of endoscopes for facial rejuvenation gained wide popularity due to its reliable and reproducible results and limitation of the morbidity related to the open approaches. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy is of paramount importance to safely release all the fascial attachments while avoiding injuries to the facial nerve. The authors find the endoscopic forehead midface lift to be a reliable and safe procedure for facial rejuvenation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0034-1383559DOI Listing
August 2014

Midface lift: panel discussion.

Facial Plast Surg Clin North Am 2014 Feb;22(1):119-37

Keller Facial Plastic Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, CA, USA. Electronic address:

Unlabelled: What is the most efficient dissection plane to perform midface lift? What is the best incision/approach (preauricular, transtemporal, transoral)? Why? What specific technique do you use? Why? What is the best method/substance for adding volume to midface lifting? In approaching the midface, how do you see the relationship of blepharoplasty versus fillers versus midface lifting?

Analysis: How has your procedure or approach evolved over the past 5 years? What have you learned, first-person experience, in doing this procedure?
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsc.2013.09.005DOI Listing
February 2014

A quantitative analysis of lateral canthal position following endoscopic forehead-midface-lift surgery.

JAMA Facial Plast Surg 2013 Sep-Oct;15(5):352-7

Department of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Lindsay House Center for Cosmetic and Reconstructive Surgery, Rochester, New York2now with the Department of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Kolstad Facial Plastic Surgery, La Jolla, California.

Importance: The value of this study is to evaluate outcomes of endoscopic forehead-midface-lift surgery. Many surgeons are reluctant to offer this procedure for fear of change in the shape and appearance of the eyelid.

Objective: To objectively evaluate the change in lateral canthal position following endoscopic forehead-midface-lift surgery.

Design: A retrospective review of consecutive patients undergoing endoscopic forehead-midface-lift and lower blepharoplasty procedures for cosmetic midface rejuvenation.

Setting: A private facial plastic surgery practice.

Participants: Photometric data were obtained from before-and-after surgery images from 40 patients.

Main Outcomes And Measures: All photographs were analyzed to determine the horizontal width, vertical height, palpebral fissure width, or angle between the medial and lateral canthi. The right and left eyes were evaluated independently, with the results analyzed using a 2-tailed paired t test with a confidence interval of 0.05 or less (required for statistical significance).

Results: The results indicated no statistically significant change in the horizontal width (right, P = .25; left P = .07), vertical height (right, P = .99; left, P = .72), palpebral fissure width (right, P = .28; left, P = .48), and angle of the lateral canthus (right, P = .99; left, P = .30) before and after surgery.

Conclusions And Relevance: The endoscopic forehead-midface-lift is a reliable method of addressing midface descent. This study objectively identified no significant differences in the position of the lateral canthus before and after surgery.

Level Of Evidence: 4.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamafacial.2013.1220DOI Listing
May 2014

Upper lid blepharoplasty: a current perspective.

Clin Plast Surg 2013 Jan;40(1):157-65

Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, The Redwood Center for Facial Plastic Surgery, Palo Alto, CA, USA.

Upper eyelid blepharoplasty is one of the most common facial plastic surgeries performed in the United States. Understanding how brow position contributes to the upper eyelid appearance is essential. Consistent and desirable surgical outcomes are best achieved with a detailed knowledge of periorbital anatomy. The surgeon must understand patients' expectations and ensure that surgical goals are realistic. The potential complications and their management are discussed. The goal of upper eyelid blepharoplasty is to create a sculpted upper lid with a visible pretarsal strip and subtle fullness along the lateral upper lid-brow complex. The trend toward volume preservation is discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cps.2012.07.005DOI Listing
January 2013

Creating elegance and refinement at the nasal tip.

Facial Plast Surg 2012 Apr 6;28(2):166-70. Epub 2012 May 6.

Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, Lindsay House Center for Cosmetic and Reconstructive Surgery, 937 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607, USA.

Enhancing nasal tip definition requires a three-dimensional approach encompassing both form and function. Dome refinements achieved during surgery should be created with sufficient integrity to withstand postoperative healing forces. Stabilizing the nasal base is the first component of dome alterations and prevents loss of tip rotation and projection. Structural grafting can be used to enhance tip definition and at the same time adds support to the cartilaginous framework. Tip shield grafts camouflage dome asymmetries, establish the tip-defining point, and enhance the supratip break. Shield grafts can be placed in all skin types with appropriate contouring and camouflaging techniques.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0032-1309295DOI Listing
April 2012

Temporal branch of the facial nerve and its relationship to fascial layers.

Arch Facial Plast Surg 2010 Jan-Feb;12(1):16-23

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Başkent University, Ankara.

Objectives: To eliminate the inconsistency in the nomenclature, to anatomically and definitively describe the topographic relationship of the temporal branch of the facial nerve to the fascial layers and the fat pads, and to create an effective algorithm to define the safest approaches and planes for surgical procedures in this area.

Methods: The study was performed using 18 hemifacial cadaveric specimens. In 12 hemifacial specimens, the facial halves were coronally sectioned and dissected. In 6 hemifacial specimens, planar dissection was performed layer by layer.

Results: The temporal branch of the facial nerve that traversed inside the deep layers of the temporoparietal fascia and the superficial musculoaponeurotic system coursed along the zygomatic arch as 1 (14.3%), 2 (57.1%), 3 (14.3%), and 4 (14.3%) twigs in the specimens. The temporoparietal fascia had no attachment to the zygomatic arch and continued caudally as the superficial musculoaponeurotic system. Adhesions were between the temporoparietal fascia and the superficial layer of the deep temporal fascia around the zygomatic arch. In most specimens, the superficial layer of the deep temporal fascia continued as the parotideomasseterica fascia, and a deep layer abutted the posterosuperior edge of the zygomatic arch.

Conclusion: An easy and safe surgical approach in this area is to elevate the superficial layer deep to the intermediate fat pad directly on the deep layer of the deep temporal fascia descending to the periosteum along the zygomatic arch.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archfacial.2009.96DOI Listing
March 2010

Management of the aging nose.

Facial Plast Surg 2009 Nov 18;25(4):215-21. Epub 2009 Nov 18.

Department of Otolaryngology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14607, USA.

As a growing segment of our population, mature patients seeking rhinoplasty for both functional and aesthetic reasons will increasingly be encountered by the facial plastic surgeon. The aging process is characterized by a gradual derotation and deprojection of the nasal tip. This article provides an overview of versatile and proven techniques that may be applied to the majority of aging nose rhinoplasty cases and that have been found to yield predictable and lasting results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0029-1242032DOI Listing
November 2009

Lower eyelid aesthetics after endoscopic forehead midface-lift.

Arch Facial Plast Surg 2008 Jul-Aug;10(4):267-72

Marotta Facial Plastic Surgery, 267 E Main St, Smithtown, NY 11787, USA.

Objective: To assess and quantitate the immediate effect of endoscopic forehead midface-lift on infraorbital hollowing and lower eyelid skin excision.

Methods: Twenty-five patients who underwent an endoscopic forehead midface-lift with a lower eyelid blepharoplasty or lower eyelid blepharoplasty without a midface-lift between January 1, 2005, and May 15, 2005, were included in the study. Preoperative and immediate postoperative measurements of the vertical height of the lower eyelid were taken in all patients. The change in the vertical height of the lower eyelid after endoscopic forehead midface-lift with blepharoplasty was compared with the change in lower eyelid height after either transconjunctival or lower eyelid skin pinch blepharoplasty or skin muscle flap blepharoplasty alone. The amount of lower eyelid skin excised after endoscopic forehead midface-lift with blepharoplasty was compared with both transconjunctival or lower eyelid skin pinch blepharoplasty and skin muscle flap blepharoplasty when a midface-lift was not performed.

Results: The average change in the vertical height of the lower eyelid after the endoscopic forehead midface-lift was 5 mm. Lower eyelid blepharoplasty alone, whether transconjunctival with skin pinch or skin muscle flap, did not affect the vertical height of the lower eyelid. The change in the vertical height of the lower eyelid with midface surgery over blepharoplasty alone was statistically significant (P < .001). The average amount of lower eyelid skin excised after endoscopic forehead midface-lift and lower eyelid skin pinch was 7.0 mm compared with 5.5 mm for both the transconjunctival lower eyelid skin pinch and the skin muscle flap techniques. The difference in skin excision when a midface-lift was performed compared with blepharoplasty alone was statistically significant (P = .008).

Conclusions: The endoscopic forehead midface-lift can reduce the vertical height of the lower eyelid by an average of 5 mm and allows more skin excision over blepharoplasty alone. The endoscopic forehead midface-lift is a powerful tool for decreasing the vertical height of the lower eyelid, lessening infraorbital hollowing, and improving dermatochalasis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archfaci.10.4.267DOI Listing
November 2008

Synthetic facial implants.

Facial Plast Surg Clin North Am 2008 Feb;16(1):1-10, v

Quatela Center for Plastic Surgery, 973 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607, USA.

This article presents a range of synthetic implant materials for use in facial plastic surgery. The authors discuss alternatives to autogenous tissue transfer in terms of biocompatibility, technique, complications, controversies, and cautions. The reader is presented information about a range of synthetic implant materials such as silicone, polyester fiber, polyamide mesh, metal, polyethylene, polyacrylamide gel, hydroxyapatite, polylactic acid, collagen, and others.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsc.2007.09.002DOI Listing
February 2008

The Korean American woman's nose: an in-depth nasal photogrammatic analysis.

Arch Facial Plast Surg 2006 Sep-Oct;8(5):319-23

Laser Skin and Vein Center of Virginia, Virginia Beach, VA, USA.

Objectives: To assess the differences in nasal anthropometric measurements between Korean American women and North American white women and to perform an in-depth nasal index calculation.

Methods: This anthropometric survey included a volunteer sample of Korean American women (n = 72) aged 18 to 35 years with Korean parents and no previous nasal surgery or trauma to the nose. Standardized and referenced frontal, lateral, and basal photographs of the nose were taken of the subjects and 22 standard anthropometric measurements of the nose were determined. Results were compared with published standards for North American white women. In addition, 18 nasal indices were calculated and compared with the published standards for North American white women.

Results: The Korean American woman's nose did not fit the neoclassic facial canons. Compared with North American white women, 20 of 22 nasal measurements in Korean American women were found to be significantly different. Nasal indices also revealed significant differences in 16 of the 18 that were calculated. The Korean American woman's nose exhibits less rotation, has a flatter dorsum, and is more flared at the alae, with less definition of the nasal tip.

Conclusions: The average Korean American and North American white female nasal anthropometric measurements are very different. As cosmetic surgery becomes more popular among Asian Americans, our findings bolster the need for a broader view of facial analysis and transcultural aesthetics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archfaci.8.5.319DOI Listing
January 2007

Management of the midface.

Facial Plast Surg Clin North Am 2006 Aug;14(3):213-20

The Lindsay House Center for Plastic Surgery, 973 East Avenue, Suite 100, Rochester, NY 14607-2216, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsc.2006.05.005DOI Listing
August 2006

Microtia reconstruction.

Facial Plast Surg Clin North Am 2006 May;14(2):117-27, vi

The Lindsay House Center for Cosmetic and Reconstructive Surgery, 973 East Avenue, Suite 100, Rochester, NY 14607, USA.

Success in microtia surgery requires meticulous patient education, planning, technique, and follow-through. When these principles are followed, excellent results as well as tremendous satisfaction are achievable for both the patient and surgeon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsc.2006.01.002DOI Listing
May 2006

Pitfalls of midface surgery.

Facial Plast Surg Clin North Am 2005 Aug;13(3):401-9

The Lindsay House Center for Plastic Surgery, 973 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607, USA.

The endoscopic forehead midface lift is perhaps the most powerful tool has been made available to the facial aesthetic surgeon in the last 10 years. Although this technique can reap the greatest rewards, it is also fraught with the greatest peril. A difficult dissection, prolonged period of edema, and numerous other pitfalls have tempered enthusiasm among facial aesthetic surgeons for this powerful technique. Nonetheless, the midface lift can be performed both safely and effectively. Through careful analysis of the pitfalls of midface surgery, one can adopt principles that help prevent or minimize potential complications. Such an approach can maximize the surgical benefit to the patient and lessen the anxiety surrounding the procedure for the patient and surgeon alike.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsc.2005.05.003DOI Listing
August 2005

Effects of endoscopic forehead/midface-lift on lower eyelid tension.

Arch Facial Plast Surg 2005 Jul-Aug;7(4):227-30

Department of Otolaryngology--Head Neck Surgery, University of Rochester, New York, USA.

Objective: To evaluate and quantify the increase in lower eyelid tension (stress) after endoscopic forehead/midface-lift in a cohort of patients with normal lower eyelid function preoperatively.

Methods: A prospective nonrandomized study was conducted at a private facial plastic surgery practice and ambulatory surgical center on 22 patients who underwent subperiosteal endoscopic forehead/midface-lift from October 2000 to June 2002. Patients were evaluated preoperatively, 4 to 6 months postoperatively, and approximately 12 months postoperatively.

Results: Compared with preoperative lower eyelid tension, there was a 4- to 5-fold increase in lower eyelid tension at 3 and 5 mm of distraction immediately after the operation. Four to 6 months after the operation, lower eyelid tension decreased but was still 2 to 3 times that of preoperative values. Twelve-month measurements for the 15 patients who remained in the study (the other 7 patients were lost to follow-up or refused to have measurements taken) showed that lower eyelid tension was 1.7 to 1.9 times preoperative values.

Conclusions: Our results show that lower eyelid tension increases following endoscopic forehead/midface-lift and that this increased tension is long lasting and quantifiable 12 months after surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archfaci.7.4.227DOI Listing
November 2005

Endobrow-midface lift.

Facial Plast Surg 2004 Aug;20(3):199-206

The Lindsay House Center for Plastic Surgery, Rochester, New York, USA.

The introduction of endoscopes is responsible for the surge in many of the aesthetic facial plastic surgeries in the past decade. This relatively new technology is widely used in upper-third facial rejuvenation and created a natural evolution into the rejuvenation of the central midthird of the face. After careful patient selection and evaluation, several key maneuvers are accomplished to achieve forehead and midface rejuvenation: (1) a subperiosteal dissection of the scalp to the level of the superior and lateral orbital rims and zygomatic arch, (2) incision and release of orbital periosteum, (3) selective myectomies of the glabella muscles, (4) subperiosteal dissection of the midface (from infraorbital rim to the inferior aspect of the maxilla and laterally over the entire zygomatic arch to the gonial angle beneath the masseteric aponeurosis), and (5) suspension and reposition of the malar fat pad, suborbicularis oculi fat, and soft tissue overlying the angle of the mandible. Endobrow-midface lift is a safe and reliable method to rejuvenate the upper two thirds of the face with excellent results while minimizing the morbidities and complications associated with the traditional open procedures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2004-861775DOI Listing
August 2004

Quantitative analysis of lip appearance after V-Y lip augmentation.

Arch Facial Plast Surg 2004 May-Jun;6(3):172-7

The New York Center for Facial Plastic and Laser Surgery, Great Neck, NY 11021, USA.

Objective: To quantitatively analyze the changes in the 3-dimensional appearance of the lips after V-Y lip advancement for lip augmentation.

Design: A retrospective single-blinded study of patients who had a V-Y lip augmentation from January 1999 to December 2001. Standardized anterior and lateral preoperative and postoperative digital photographs of patients were analyzed using digital imaging software to quantify postoperative changes.

Results: There were statistically significant increases in the vertical height of the upper red lip (75%) and in the area of the upper red lip (66%). The upper and lower lip projection increased by approximately 40%. The vertical distance from the apex to the trough of Cupid's bow increased by 56.7%.

Conclusions: The V-Y lip advancement for lip augmentation increases the parameters that characterize the fullness of the upper lip and enhances the vermilion "pout" and projection of the upper and lower lip. It also increases the curvature of Cupid's bow.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archfaci.6.3.172DOI Listing
September 2004

Surgical management of concavities of the distal nose.

Facial Plast Surg Clin North Am 2004 Feb;12(1):133-56

Division of Otolaryngology, 946 Mt. Hope Avenue, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14620, USA.

Normal topographic anatomy of the distal nose is a reflection of the delicate integration between the lower lateral cartilage, the upper lateral cartilage, the sep-tum, and skin. Understanding these relationships will help the rhinoplasty surgeon diagnose and treat con-cavities of the distal nose. Most patients present with a hybrid of these defects. For example, the patient in Fig. 19 presented for a primary rhinoplasty. A variety of concavities can be noted and include dorsal septal deflection, upper lateral cartilage avulsion on the left,bilateral lower lateral complete concavities, and the beginning of a dorsal depression (Fig. 19A-I). The nasal skeleton and the skin and soft tissue are normally in equilibrium, but trauma and reduction rhino-plasty disrupts this equilibrium. Skeletal distortion can lead to septal deflection, middle vault collapse, or alar buckling [20]. It is important to realize that correction of deflection or depression by excision needs to be balanced with augmentation, which provides balance for the previously disequilibrated skeletal and soft tissue forces. Augmentation can be done with spreader grafts, tip grafts, columellar strut, and dorsal grafts. A patient's soft tissue envelope will also play a major role in the success of a septorhinoplasty. The surgical principles of septorhinoplasty such as judicious resculpting of the cartilaginous framework, respect of major tip support, tip grafting technique, and postoperative tissue contraction still apply and must be placed in conjunction with repairing a pathological topographic concavity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1064-7406(03)00123-8DOI Listing
February 2004

The extended centrolateral endoscopic midface lift.

Facial Plast Surg 2003 May;19(2):199-208

The Lindsay House Center for Cosmetic and Reconstructive Surgery, Rochester, NY, USA.

Most of the advances in face lift techniques in the past decade have been directed at altering the aging changes of the midface. Our technique for endoscopic midface lifting releases the entire central and lateral midface, which allows for a complete resuspension and rejuvenation. This technique utilizes a subperiosteal release of the midface from the infraorbital rim to the inferior aspect of the maxilla and laterally over the entire zygomatic arch to the gonial angle beneath the masseteric aponeurosis. Suspension is achieved superolaterally to the deep temporal fascia and repositions the malar fat pad, SOOF, and soft tissues overlying the angle of the mandible. Over 400 procedures have been performed. We found the degree of improvement in the following order, from greatest to least: (1) correction of midface ptosis and infraorbital hollowing, (2) improvement of the depth of the nasolabial fold, and (3) improvement of the degree of jowling. This technique is one of low morbidity and few complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2003-40005DOI Listing
May 2003

Anatomical guides to precisely localize the frontal branch of the facial nerve.

Arch Facial Plast Surg 2003 Mar-Apr;5(2):150-2

Division of Otolaryngology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14607, USA.

Objective: To define the relationship between the frontal branch of the facial nerve and a series of blood vessels that are encountered during endoscopic forehead procedures.

Design: Anatomical study using 6 fresh cadavers (12 sides).

Results: In 11 of 12 dissected specimens, the blood vessels in the temporal region were found to lie within 2 mm of the frontal branch of the facial nerve.

Conclusions: We believe that a series of veins encountered during endoscopic forehead procedures provide the surgeon with the ability to identify the precise location of the frontal branch of the facial nerve. During endoscopic surgery, these vessels are found in a plane between the deep temporal fascia (below) and the superficial temporal fascia (above). We believe that these vessels can be thought of as arrows pointing superiorly to a frontal branch of the facial nerve as it courses through the superficial temporal fascia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archfaci.5.2.150DOI Listing
June 2003

Proptosis after retrobulbar corticosteroid injections.

Ophthalmology 2003 Feb;110(2):443-7

School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.

Purpose: This report describes the clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic findings in patients with proptosis secondary to lipomatosis after retrobulbar corticosteroid injection.

Design: Retrospective, noncomparative, interventional case series and review of the literature.

Methods: Five patients who developed symptomatic unilateral proptosis after steroid injection were studied and the literature was reviewed.

Results: No previous description was found in the literature. All five cases were studied with computed tomography, and two cases were confirmed with histopathology. No fibrosis or granulomatous inflammation was identified.

Conclusions: Orbital lipomatosis is a potential complication of retrobulbar steroid injections. Symptomatic relief can be provided by a transconjunctival approach to the lower lid fat compartment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0161-6420(02)01743-8DOI Listing
February 2003

Structural grafting in rhinoplasty.

Facial Plast Surg 2002 Nov;18(4):223-32

Department of Surgery, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.

Many surgeons consider cosmetic rhinoplasty to be one of the most challenging facial plastic surgical procedures. Open-structure rhinoplasty allows for visualization of bony-cartilaginous deformities, preservation of nasal structural integrity, and precise nasal reshaping. The ultimate, external appearance of the nose is the sum of the interaction of the bony-cartilaginous skeleton and the skin soft-tissue envelope. This article describes the use of autologous, structural cartilage grafts in primary and secondary rhinoplasty. Emphasis is placed on the use of septal, auricular, and costal cartilage grafts to provide for a structurally sound skeletal framework and thereby a predictable postoperative result. Deformities of the middle and lower third of the nose are specifically addressed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2002-36490DOI Listing
November 2002
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