Publications by authors named "Vitaliy Kolodyazhniy"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Caffeine-dependent changes of sleep-wake regulation: Evidence for adaptation after repeated intake.

Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 2020 04 19;99:109851. Epub 2019 Dec 19.

Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; Transfaculty Research Platform Molecular and Cognitive Neurosciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

Background: Circadian and sleep-homeostatic mechanisms regulate timing and quality of wakefulness. To enhance wakefulness, daily consumption of caffeine in the morning and afternoon is highly common. However, the effects of such a regular intake pattern on circadian sleep-wake regulation are unknown. Thus, we investigated if daily daytime caffeine intake and caffeine withdrawal affect circadian rhythms and wake-promotion in habitual consumers.

Methods: Twenty male young volunteers participated in a randomised, double-blind, within-subject study with three conditions: i) caffeine (150 mg 3 x daily for 10 days), ii) placebo (3 x daily for 10 days) and iii) withdrawal (150 mg caffeine 3 x daily for eight days, followed by a switch to placebo for two days). Starting on day nine of treatment, salivary melatonin and cortisol, evening nap sleep as well as sleepiness and vigilance performance throughout day and night were quantified during 43 h in an in-laboratory, light and posture-controlled protocol.

Results: Neither the time course of melatonin (i.e. onset, amplitude or area under the curve) nor the time course of cortisol was significantly affected by caffeine or withdrawal. During withdrawal, however, volunteers reported increased sleepiness, showed more attentional lapses as well as polysomnography-derived markers of elevated sleep propensity in the late evening compared to both the placebo and caffeine condition.

Conclusions: The typical pattern of caffeine intake with consumption in both the morning and afternoon hours may not necessarily result in a circadian phase shift in the evening nor lead to clear-cut benefits in alertness. The time-of-day independent effects of caffeine withdrawal on evening nap sleep, sleepiness and performance suggest an adaptation to the substance, presumably in the homeostatic aspect of sleep-wake regulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pnpbp.2019.109851DOI Listing
April 2020

Attend or defend? Sex differences in behavioral, autonomic, and respiratory response patterns to emotion-eliciting films.

Biol Psychol 2017 12 18;130:30-40. Epub 2017 Oct 18.

Clinical Stress & Emotion Lab, Division of Clinical Psychology, Psychotherapy, and Health Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria; Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience and Department of Psychology, University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria.

Sex differences in emotional reactivity have been studied primarily for negative but less so for positive stimuli; likewise, sex differences in the psychophysiological response-patterning during such stimuli are poorly understood. Thus, the present study examined sex differences in response to negative/positive and high/low arousing films (classified as threat-, loss-, achievement-, and recreation-related, vs. neutral films), while measuring 18 muscular, autonomic, and respiratory parameters. Sex differences emerged for all films, but were most prominent for threat-related films: Despite equivalent valence and arousal ratings, women displayed more facial-muscular and respiratory responding than men and pronounced sympathetic activation (preejection period, other cardiovascular and electrodermal measures), while men showed coactivated sympathetic/parasympathetic responding (including increased respiratory sinus arrhythmia). This indicates a prototypical threat-related defense response in women, while men showed a pattern of sustained orienting, which can be understood as a shift toward less threat proximity in the defense cascade model. Clinical implications are discussed within a socio-evolutionary framework.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2017.10.006DOI Listing
December 2017

Differential impact in young and older individuals of blue-enriched white light on circadian physiology and alertness during sustained wakefulness.

Sci Rep 2017 08 8;7(1):7620. Epub 2017 Aug 8.

Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, 4012, Basel, Switzerland.

We tested the effect of different lights as a countermeasure against sleep-loss decrements in alertness, melatonin and cortisol profile, skin temperature and wrist motor activity in healthy young and older volunteers under extendend wakefulness. 26 young [mean (SE): 25.0 (0.6) y)] and 12 older participants [(mean (SE): 63.6 (1.3) y)] underwent 40-h of sustained wakefulness during 3 balanced crossover segments, once under dim light (DL: 8 lx), and once under either white light (WL: 250 lx, 2,800 K) or blue-enriched white light (BL: 250 lx, 9,000 K) exposure. Subjective sleepiness, melatonin and cortisol were assessed hourly. Skin temperature and wrist motor activity were continuously recorded. WL and BL induced an alerting response in both the older (p = 0.005) and the young participants (p = 0.021). The evening rise in melatonin was attentuated under both WL and BL only in the young. Cortisol levels were increased and activity levels decreased in the older compared to the young only under BL (p = 0.0003). Compared to the young, both proximal and distal skin temperatures were lower in older participants under all lighting conditions. Thus the color temperature of normal intensity lighting may have differential effects on circadian physiology in young and older individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-07060-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5548856PMC
August 2017

Metabolic decoupling in daily life in patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia.

J Psychiatr Res 2015 Sep 9;68:377-83. Epub 2015 May 9.

Department of Psychology, Division of Clinical Psychology, Psychotherapy, and Health Psychology, University of Salzburg, Austria. Electronic address:

Various studies have assessed autonomic and respiratory underpinnings of panic attacks, yet the psychophysiological functioning of panic disorder (PD) patients has rarely been examined under naturalistic conditions at times when acute attacks were not reported. We hypothesized that emotional activation in daily life causes physiologically demonstrable deviations from efficient metabolic regulation in PD patients. Metabolic coupling was estimated as within-individual correlations between heart rate (HR) and indices of metabolic activity, i.e., physical activity (measured by 3-axial accelerometry, Acc), and minute ventilation (Vm, measured by calibrated inductive plethysmography, as proxy for oxygen consumption). A total of 565 daytime hours were recorded in 19 PD patients and 20 healthy controls (HC). Pairwise cross-correlations of minute-by-minute averages of these metabolic indices were calculated for each participant and then correlated with several indices of self-reported anxiety. Ambulatory HR was elevated in PD (p = .05, d = 0.67). Patients showed reduced HR-Acc (p < .006, d = 0.97) and HR-Vm coupling (p < .009, d = 0.91). Combining Vm and Acc to predict HR showed the strongest group separation (p < .002, d = 1.07). Discriminant analyses, based on the combination of Vm and Acc to predict HR, classified 77% of all participants correctly. In PD, HR-Acc coupling was inversely related to trait anxiety sensitivity, as well as tonic and phasic daytime anxiety. The novel method that was used demonstrates that anxiety in PD may reduce efficient long-term metabolic coupling. Metabolic decoupling may serve as physiological characteristic of PD and might aid diagnostics for PD and other anxiety disorders. This measure deserves further study in research on health consequences of anxiety and psychosocial stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.04.027DOI Listing
September 2015

Pre- to postsleep change in psychophysiological reactivity to emotional films: Late-night REM sleep is associated with attenuated emotional processing.

Psychophysiology 2015 Jun 15;52(6):813-25. Epub 2015 Jan 15.

Clinical Stress and Emotion Lab, Division of Clinical Psychology, Psychotherapy, and Health Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria.

Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep has been postulated to facilitate emotional processing of negative stimuli. However, empirical evidence is mixed and primarily based on self-report data and picture-viewing studies. This study used a full-length aversive film to elicit intense emotion on one evening, and an emotionally neutral control film on another evening while psychophysiological and experiential responses were measured. Subsequent sleep was monitored polysomnographically, and specific film scenes were presented again on the next morning. Correlation analyses revealed that participants with longer late-night REM sleep after the aversive film showed higher increase of electrodermal reactivity and less reduction of facial corrugator muscle reactivity to negative film scenes on the next morning. This indicates that REM sleep may be associated with attenuated emotional processing of prolonged and intense emotional stimuli from pre- to postsleep.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/psyp.12404DOI Listing
June 2015

The circadian regulation of sleep: impact of a functional ADA-polymorphism and its association to working memory improvements.

PLoS One 2014 1;9(12):e113734. Epub 2014 Dec 1.

Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, 4012, Basel, Switzerland.

Sleep is regulated in a time-of-day dependent manner and profits working memory. However, the impact of the circadian timing system as well as contributions of specific sleep properties to this beneficial effect remains largely unexplored. Moreover, it is unclear to which extent inter-individual differences in sleep-wake regulation depend on circadian phase and modulate the association between sleep and working memory. Here, sleep electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded during a 40-h multiple nap protocol, and working memory performance was assessed by the n-back task 10 times before and after each scheduled nap sleep episode. Twenty-four participants were genotyped regarding a functional polymorphism in adenosine deaminase (rs73598374, 12 G/A-, 12 G/G-allele carriers), previously associated with differences in sleep-wake regulation. Our results indicate that genotype-driven differences in sleep depend on circadian phase: heterozygous participants were awake longer and slept less at the end of the biological day, while they exhibited longer non rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and slow wave sleep concomitant with reduced power between 8-16 Hz at the end of the biological night. Slow wave sleep and NREM sleep delta EEG activity covaried positively with overall working memory performance, independent of circadian phase and genotype. Moreover, REM sleep duration benefitted working memory particularly when occurring in the early morning hours and specifically in heterozygous individuals. Even though based on a small sample size and thus requiring replication, our results suggest genotype-dependent differences in circadian sleep regulation. They further indicate that REM sleep, being under strong circadian control, boosts working memory performance according to genotype in a time-of-day dependent manner. Finally, our data provide first evidence that slow wave sleep and NREM sleep delta activity, majorly regulated by sleep homeostatic mechanisms, is linked to working memory independent of the timing of the sleep episode within the 24-h cycle.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0113734PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4249976PMC
September 2015

Insights into behavioral vulnerability to differential sleep pressure and circadian phase from a functional ADA polymorphism.

J Biol Rhythms 2014 Apr;29(2):119-30

Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

Sleep loss affects human behavior in a nonuniform manner, depending on the cognitive domain and also the circadian phase. Besides, evidence exists about stable interindividual variations in sleep loss-related performance impairments. Despite this evidence, only a few studies have considered both circadian phase and neurobehavioral domain when investigating trait-like vulnerability to sleep manipulation. By applying a randomized, crossover design with 2 sleep pressure conditions (40 h sleep deprivation vs. 40 h multiple naps), we investigated the influence of a human adenosine deaminase (ADA) polymorphism (rs73598374) on several behavioral measures throughout nearly 2 circadian cycles. Confirming earlier studies, we observed that under sleep deprivation the previously reported vulnerable G/A-allele carriers felt overall sleepier than G/G-allele carriers. As expected, this difference was no longer present when sleep pressure was reduced by the application of multiple naps. Concomitantly, well-being was worse in the G/A genotype under sleep loss when compared to the nap protocol, and n-back working memory performance appeared to be specifically susceptible to sleep-wake manipulation in this genotype. When considering psychomotor vigilance performance, however, a higher sensitivity to sleep-wake manipulation was detected in homozygous participants, but specifically at the end of the night and only for optimal task performance. Although these data are based on a small sample size and hence require replication (12 G/A- and 12 G/G-allele carriers), they confirm the assumption that interindividual differences regarding the effect of sleep manipulation highly depend on the cognitive task and circadian phase, and thus emphasize the necessity of a multimethodological approach. Moreover, they indicate that napping might be suitable to counteract endogenously heightened sleep pressure depending on the neurobehavioral domain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0748730414524898DOI Listing
April 2014

An improved method for estimating human circadian phase derived from multichannel ambulatory monitoring and artificial neural networks.

Chronobiol Int 2012 Oct 14;29(8):1078-97. Epub 2012 Aug 14.

Division of Clinical Psychology, Psychotherapy and Health Psychology, Institute for Psychology, University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria.

Recently, we developed a novel method for estimating human circadian phase with noninvasive ambulatory measurements combined with subject-independent multiple regression models and a curve-fitting approach. With this, we were able to estimate circadian phase under real-life conditions with low subject burden, i.e., without need of constant routine (CR) laboratory conditions, and without measuring standard circadian markers, such as core body temperature (CBT) or pineal hormone melatonin rhythms. The precision of ambulatory-derived estimated circadian phase was within an error of 12 ± 41 min (mean ± SD) in comparison to melatonin phase during a CR protocol. The physiological measures could be reduced to a triple combination: skin temperatures, irradiance in the blue spectral band of ambient light, and motion acceleration. Here, we present a nonlinear regression model approach based on artificial neural networks for a larger data set (25 healthy young males), including both the original data and additional data collected in the same protocol and using the same equipment. Throughout our validation study, subjects wore multichannel ambulatory monitoring devices and went about their daily routine for 1 wk. The devices collected a large number of physiological, behavioral, and environmental variables, including CBT, skin temperatures, cardiovascular and respiratory functions, movement/posture, ambient temperature, spectral composition and intensity of light perceived at eye level, and sleep logs. After the ambulatory phase, study volunteers underwent a 32-h CR protocol in the laboratory for measuring unmasked circadian phase (i.e., "midpoint" of the nighttime melatonin rhythm). To overcome the complex masking effects of many different confounding variables during ambulatory measurements, neural network-based nonlinear regression techniques were applied in combination with the cross-validation approach to subject-independent prediction of circadian phase. The most accurate estimate of circadian phase with a prediction error of -3 ± 23 min (mean ± SD) was achieved using only two types of the measured variables: skin temperatures and irradiance for ambient light in the blue spectral band. Compared to our previous linear multiple regression modeling approach, motion acceleration data can be excluded and prediction accuracy, nevertheless, improved. Neural network regression showed statistically significant improvement of variance of prediction error over traditional approaches in determining circadian phase based on single predictors (CBT, motion acceleration, or sleep logs), even though none of these variables was included as predictor. We, therefore, have identified two sets of noninvasive measures that, combined with the prediction model, can provide researchers and clinicians with a precise measure of internal time, in spite of the masking effects of daily behavior. This method, here validated in healthy young men, requires testing in a clinical or shiftwork population suffering from circadian sleep-wake disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/07420528.2012.700669DOI Listing
October 2012

An affective computing approach to physiological emotion specificity: toward subject-independent and stimulus-independent classification of film-induced emotions.

Psychophysiology 2011 Jul 24;48(7):908-22. Epub 2011 Jan 24.

Department of Clinical Psychology, Psychotherapy, and Health Psychology, University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria.

The hypothesis of physiological emotion specificity has been tested using pattern classification analysis (PCA). To address limitations of prior research using PCA, we studied effects of feature selection (sequential forward selection, sequential backward selection), classifier type (linear and quadratic discriminant analysis, neural networks, k-nearest neighbors method), and cross-validation method (subject- and stimulus-(in)dependence). Analyses were run on a data set of 34 participants watching two sets of three 10-min film clips (fearful, sad, neutral) while autonomic, respiratory, and facial muscle activity were assessed. Results demonstrate that the three states can be classified with high accuracy by most classifiers, with the sparsest model having only five features, even for the most difficult task of identifying the emotion of an unknown subject in an unknown situation (77.5%). Implications for choosing PCA parameters are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8986.2010.01170.xDOI Listing
July 2011

Estimation of human circadian phase via a multi-channel ambulatory monitoring system and a multiple regression model.

J Biol Rhythms 2011 Feb;26(1):55-67

Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Faculty for Psychology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

Reliable detection of circadian phase in humans using noninvasive ambulatory measurements in real-life conditions is challenging and still an unsolved problem. The masking effects of everyday behavior and environmental input such as physical activity and light on the measured variables need to be considered critically. Here, we aimed at developing techniques for estimating circadian phase with the lowest subject burden possible, that is, without the need of constant routine (CR) laboratory conditions or without measuring the standard circadian markers, (rectal) core body temperature (CBT), and melatonin levels. In this validation study, subjects (N = 16) wore multi-channel ambulatory monitoring devices and went about their daily routine for 1 week. The devices measured a large number of physiological, behavioral, and environmental variables, including CBT, skin temperatures, cardiovascular and respiratory function, movement/posture, ambient temperature, and the spectral composition and intensity of light received at eye level. Sleep diaries were logged electronically. After the ambulatory phase, subjects underwent a 32-h CR procedure in the laboratory for measuring unmasked circadian phase based on the "midpoint" of the salivary melatonin profile. To overcome the complex masking effects of confounding variables during ambulatory measurements, multiple regression techniques were applied in combination with the cross-validation approach to subject-independent prediction of circadian phase. The most accurate estimate of circadian phase was achieved using skin temperatures, irradiance for ambient light in the blue spectral band, and motion acceleration as predictors with lags of up to 24 h. Multiple regression showed statistically significant improvement of variance of prediction error over the traditional approaches to determining circadian phase based on single predictors (motion acceleration or sleep log), although CBT was intentionally not included as the predictor. Compared to CBT alone, our method resulted in a 40% smaller range of prediction errors and a nonsignificant reduction of error variance. The proposed noninvasive measurement method could find applications in sleep medicine or in other domains where knowing the exact endogenous circadian phase is important (e.g., for the timing of light therapy).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0748730410391619DOI Listing
February 2011
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