Publications by authors named "Virginie Andry"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Somatostatin analogue pasireotide (SOM230) inhibits catecholamine secretion in human pheochromocytoma cells.

Cancer Lett 2021 Oct 9. Epub 2021 Oct 9.

Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université de Strasbourg, Institut des Neurosciences Cellulaires et Intégratives, F-67000, Strasbourg, France. Electronic address:

Increasingly common, neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are regarded nowadays as neoplasms potentially causing debilitating symptoms and life-threatening medical conditions. Pheochromocytoma is a NET that develops from chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, and is responsible for an excessive secretion of catecholamines. Consequently, patients have an increased risk for clinical symptoms such as hypertension, elevated stroke risk and various cardiovascular complications. Somatostatin analogues are among the main anti-secretory medical drugs used in current clinical practice in patient with NETs. However, their impact on pheochromocytoma-associated catecholamine hypersecretion remains incompletely explored. This study investigated the potential efficacy of octreotide and pasireotide (SOM230) on human tumor cells directly cultured from freshly resected pheochromocytomas using an implemented catecholamine secretion measurement by carbon fiber amperometry. SOM230 treatment efficiently inhibited nicotine-induced catecholamine secretion both in bovine chromaffin cells and in human tumor cells whereas octreotide had no effect. Moreover, SOM230 specifically decreased the number of exocytic events by impairing the stimulation-evoked calcium influx as well as the nicotinic receptor-activated inward current in human pheochromocytoma cells. Altogether, our findings indicate that SOM230 acts as an inhibitor of catecholamine secretion through a mechanism involving the nicotinic receptor and might be considered as a potential anti-secretory treatment for patients with pheochromocytoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canlet.2021.10.009DOI Listing
October 2021

The endocannabinoid system is modulated in reward and homeostatic brain regions following diet-induced obesity in rats: a cluster analysis approach.

Eur J Nutr 2021 Jun 24. Epub 2021 Jun 24.

Laboratoire de Neurosciences Cognitives Et Adaptatives (LNCA), UMR7364, Université́ de Strasbourg, CNRS, 12 rue Goethe, 67000, Strasbourg, France.

Objectives: Increased availability of high-calorie palatable food in most countries has resulted in overconsumption of these foods, suggesting that excessive eating is driven by pleasure, rather than metabolic need. The behavior contributes to the rise in eating disorders, obesity, and associated pathologies like diabetes, cardiac disease, and cancers. The mesocorticolimbic dopamine and homeostatic circuits are interconnected and play a central role in palatable food intake. The endocannabinoid system is expressed in these circuits and represents a potent regulator of feeding, but the impact of an obesogenic diet on its expression is not fully known.

Methods: Food intake and body weight were recorded in male Wistar rats over a 6-week free-choice regimen of high fat and sugar; transcriptional regulations of the endocannabinoid system were examined post-mortem in brain reward regions (prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, ventral tegmental area, and arcuate nucleus). K-means cluster analysis was used to classify animals based on individual sensitivity to obesity and palatable food intake. Endocannabinoid levels were quantified in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Gene expression in dopamine and homeostatic systems, including ghrelin and leptin receptors, and classical homeostatic peptides, were also investigated.

Results: The free-choice high-fat -and sugar diet induced hyperphagia and obesity in rats. Cluster analysis revealed that the propensity to develop obesity and excessive palatable food intake was differently associated with dopamine and endocannabinoid system gene expression in reward and homeostatic brain regions. CB2 receptor mRNA was increased in the nucleus accumbens of high sugar consumers, whereas CB1 receptor mRNA was decreased in obesity prone rats.

Conclusions: Transcriptional data are consistent with observations of altered dopamine function in rodents that have access to an obesogenic diet and point to cannabinoid receptors as GPCR targets involved in neuroplasticity mechanisms associated with maladaptive intake of palatable food.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-021-02613-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8222960PMC
June 2021

Binge sucrose-induced neuroadaptations: A focus on the endocannabinoid system.

Appetite 2021 09 14;164:105258. Epub 2021 Apr 14.

Université de Strasbourg, Laboratoire de Neurosciences Cognitives et Adaptatives (LNCA), Centre de la Recherche Nationale Scientifique, 12 rue Goethe, F-67000, Strasbourg France. Electronic address:

Binge eating, the defining feature of binge eating disorder (BED), is associated with a number of adverse health outcomes as well as a reduced quality of life. Animals, like humans, selectively binge on highly palatable food suggesting that the behaviour is driven by hedonic, rather than metabolic, signals. Given the links to both reward processing and food intake, this study examined the contribution of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) to binge-like eating in rats. Separate groups were given intermittent (12 h) or continuous (24 h) access to 10% sucrose and food over 28 days, with only the 12 h access group displaying excessive sucrose intake within a discrete period of time (i.e., binge eating). Importantly, this group also exhibited alterations in ECS transcripts and endocannabinoid levels in brain reward regions, including an increase in cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) mRNA in the nucleus accumbens as well as changes in endocannabinoid levels in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. We then tested whether different doses (1 and 3 mg/kg) of a CB1R antagonist, Rimonabant, modify binge-like intake or the development of a conditioned place preference (CPP) to sucrose. CB1R blockade reduced binge-like intake of sucrose and blocked a sucrose CPP, but only in rats that had undergone 28 days of sucrose consumption. These findings indicate that sucrose bingeing alters the ECS in reward-related areas, modifications that exacerbate the effect of CB1R blockade on sucrose reward. Overall, our results broaden the understanding of neural alterations associated with bingeing eating and demonstrate an important role for CB1R mechanisms in reward processing. In addition, these findings have implications for understanding substance abuse, which is also characterized by excessive and maladaptive intake, pointing towards addictive-like properties of palatable food.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2021.105258DOI Listing
September 2021

Action of mefloquine/amitriptyline THN101 combination on neuropathic mechanical hypersensitivity in mice.

Pain 2021 Mar 24. Epub 2021 Mar 24.

Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université de Strasbourg, Institut des Neurosciences Cellulaires et Intégratives, Strasbourg, France Theranexus, Lyon, France.

Abstract: Tricyclic antidepressants that inhibit serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake, such as amitriptyline, are among the first-line treatments for neuropathic pain, which is caused by a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory nervous system. These treatments are, however, partially efficient to alleviate neuropathic pain symptoms, and better treatments are still highly required. Interactions between neurons and glial cells participate in neuropathic pain processes, and importantly, connexins-transmembrane proteins involved in cell-cell communication-contribute to these interactions. In a neuropathic pain model in rats, mefloquine, a connexin inhibitor, has been shown to potentiate the antihyperalgesic effect of amitriptyline, a widely used antidepressant. In this study, we further investigated this improvement of amitriptyline action by mefloquine, using the cuff model of neuropathic pain in mice. We first observed that oral mefloquine co-treatment prolonged the effect of amitriptyline on mechanical hypersensitivity by 12 hours after administration. In addition, we showed that this potentiation was not due to pharmacokinetic interactions between the 2 drugs. Besides, lesional and pharmacological approaches showed that the prolonged effect was induced through noradrenergic descending pathways and the recruitment of α2 adrenoceptors. Another connexin blocker, carbenoxolone, also improved amitriptyline action. Additional in vitro studies suggested that mefloquine may also directly act on serotonin transporters and on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors, but drugs acting on these other targets failed to amplify amitriptyline action. Together, our data indicate that pharmacological blockade of connexins potentiates the therapeutic effect of amitriptyline in neuropathic pain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000002276DOI Listing
March 2021

Long-lasting analgesic and neuroprotective action of the non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic etifoxine in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

Neuropharmacology 2021 01 16;182:108407. Epub 2020 Nov 16.

Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and University of Strasbourg, Institute for Cellular and Integrative Neuroscience (INCI), 67000, Strasbourg, France. Electronic address:

Neuropathic pain is frequently associated with anxiety and major depressive disorders, which considerably impact the overall patient experience. Favoring GABAergic inhibition through the pain matrix has emerged as a promising strategy to restore proper processing of nociceptive and affective information in neuropathic pain states. In this context, the non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic etifoxine (EFX), known to amplify GABAergic inhibition through positive modulation of GABA receptors and neurosteroidogenesis, presents several advantages. Therefore, we sought to investigate the preclinical therapeutic potential of EFX on the somatosensory and affective components of neuropathic pain. Here, we used a murine model in which neuropathic pain was induced by the implantation of a compressive cuff around the sciatic nerve (mononeuropathy). We showed that the intraperitoneal EFX treatment for five consecutive days (50 mg/kg) relieved mechanical allodynia in a sustained manner. Besides its effect on evoked mechanical hypersensitivity, EFX also alleviated aversiveness of ongoing pain as well as anxiodepressive-like consequences of neuropathic pain following cuff-induced mononeuropathy. This effect was also seen 12 weeks after induction of the neuropathy when allodynia was no longer present. Analgesic and neuroprotective actions of EFX were also seen by the absence of neuropathic pain symptoms if a second sciatic nerve constriction injury was applied to the contralateral hindpaw. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed a normalization of brainstem serotonin levels in EFX-treated animals and an increase in norepinephrine. This study suggests that EFX presents promising therapeutic potential for the relief of both somatosensory and affective consequences of neuropathic pain, a beneficial effect that is likely to involve monoamine descending controls.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropharm.2020.108407DOI Listing
January 2021

A Nonpeptide Oxytocin Receptor Agonist for a Durable Relief of Inflammatory Pain.

Sci Rep 2020 02 20;10(1):3017. Epub 2020 Feb 20.

Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and University of Strasbourg, UPR3212 Institute of Cellular and Integrative Neurosciences, Strasbourg, France.

Oxytocin possesses several physiological and social functions, among which an important analgesic effect. For this purpose, oxytocin binds mainly to its unique receptor, both in the central nervous system and in the peripheral nociceptive terminal axon in the skin. However, despite its interesting analgesic properties and its current use in clinics to facilitate labor, oxytocin is not used in pain treatment. Indeed, it is rapidly metabolized, with a half-life in the blood circulation estimated at five minutes and in cerebrospinal fluid around twenty minutes in humans and rats. Moreover, oxytocin itself suffers from several additional drawbacks: a lack of specificity, an extremely poor oral absorption and distribution, and finally, a lack of patentability. Recently, a first non-peptide full agonist of oxytocin receptor (LIT-001) of low molecular weight has been synthesized with reported beneficial effect for social interactions after peripheral administration. In the present study, we report that a single intraperitoneal administration of LIT-001 in a rat model induces a long-lasting reduction in inflammatory pain-induced hyperalgesia symptoms, paving the way to an original drug development strategy for pain treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-59929-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7033278PMC
February 2020
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