Publications by authors named "Virginia Speare"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Clinician-Reported Impact of Germline Multigene Panel Testing on Cancer Risk Management Recommendations.

JNCI Cancer Spectr 2022 03;6(2)

Department of Medicine and of Epidemiology and Population Health, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.

Background: With increased adoption of multi-gene panel testing (MGPT) for hereditary cancer, management guidelines now include a wider range of predisposition genes. Yet little is known about whether MGPT results prompt changes to clinicians' risk management recommendations and whether those recommendations adhere to guidelines.

Methods: We assessed cancer risk management recommendations made by clinicians ordering MGPT for hereditary cancer at a diagnostic laboratory using an internet-based survey. We received paired pre- and posttest responses for 2172 patients (response rate = 14.3%). Unpaired posttest responses were received in 168 additional patients with positive results. All tests were 2-sided.

Results: Clinicians reported a change in risk management recommendations for 76.6% of patients who tested positive for a pathogenic or likely pathogenic variant, with changes to surveillance being most common (71.1%), followed by surgical (33.6%), chemoprevention (15.1%), and clinical trial (9.4%) recommendations. Clinicians recommended risk-reducing interventions more often for patients with pathogenic variants in high-risk than moderate-risk genes (P < .001), whereas surveillance recommendations were similar for high-risk and moderate-risk genes. Guideline adherence was high for surveillance (86.3%) and surgical (79.6%) recommendations. Changes to risk management recommendations occurred in 8.8% and 7.6% of patients with uncertain and negative results, respectively.

Conclusions: Clinicians report frequent changes to cancer risk management recommendations based on positive results in both high-risk and moderate-risk genes. Reported introduction of interventions in patients with inconclusive and negative results is rare and adherence to practice guidelines is high in patients with positive results, suggesting a low probability of harm resulting from MGPT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jncics/pkac002DOI Listing
March 2022

Paired-like homeobox gene (PHOX2B) nonpolyalanine repeat expansion mutations (NPARMs): genotype-phenotype correlation in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS).

Genet Med 2021 09 6;23(9):1656-1663. Epub 2021 May 6.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Autonomic Medicine, Center for Autonomic Medicine in Pediatrics (CAMP), Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago and Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute, Chicago, IL, USA.

Purpose: CCHS is an extremely rare congenital disorder requiring artificial ventilation as life support. Typically caused by heterozygous polyalanine repeat expansion mutations (PARMs) in the PHOX2B gene, identification of a relationship between PARM length and phenotype severity has enabled anticipatory management. However, for patients with non-PARMs in PHOX2B (NPARMs, ~10% of CCHS patients), a genotype-phenotype correlation has not been established. This comprehensive report of PHOX2B NPARMs and associated phenotypes, aims at elucidating potential genotype-phenotype correlations that will guide anticipatory management.

Methods: An international collaboration (clinical, commercial, and research laboratories) was established to collect/share information on novel and previously published PHOX2B NPARM cases. Variants were categorized by type and gene location. Categorical data were analyzed with chi-square and Fisher's exact test; further pairwise comparisons were made on significant results.

Results: Three hundred two individuals with PHOX2B NPARMs were identified, including 139 previously unreported cases. Findings demonstrate significant associations between key phenotypic manifestations of CCHS and variant type, location, and predicted effect on protein function.

Conclusion: This study presents the largest cohort of PHOX2B NPARMs and associated phenotype data to date, enabling genotype-phenotype studies that will advance personalized, anticipatory management and help elucidate pathological mechanisms. Further characterization of PHOX2B NPARMs demands longitudinal clinical follow-up through international registries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-021-01178-xDOI Listing
September 2021

Paired tumor sequencing and germline testing in breast cancer management: An experience of a single academic center.

Cancer Rep (Hoboken) 2020 12 3;3(6):e1287. Epub 2020 Sep 3.

Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Stem Cell Transplant Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.

Background: Genetic testing for cancer predisposition is recommended to women with breast cancer who meet the criteria for such testing. After the FDA approvals of the poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, olaparib and talazoparib, for treatment of metastatic breast cancer, carrying germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, the genetic testing result has become critical in their care. With the recent FDA approval of alpelisib for the treatment of PIK3CA-mutated hormone-receptor positive metastatic breast cancer, tumor molecular profiling to identify somatic mutations and potential molecularly targeted agents is increasingly utilized in the treatment of advanced breast cancer.

Aim: Combining germline and somatic sequencing (paired testing) offers an advantage over a single technique approach. Our study evaluates the role of paired testing on the management of breast cancer patients.

Methods And Results: Forty-three breast cancer patients treated at Rush University Medical Center underwent paired germline and somatic variant testing in 2015 to 2017. A retrospective chart review was conducted with the analysis of demographic, clinical, and genomic data. Three actionable germline variants were found in the CHEK2 (2) and ATM (1) genes. 95% of tumors had somatic mutations. Seventy-seven percent of tumors had genomic alterations targetable with agents approved for breast cancer and 88% had molecular targets for agents approved for other cancers. Clinical examples of such use are described and potential future directions of tumor and paired testing are discussed.

Conclusions: Germline variants were present in a relatively small patient group not routinely tested for inherited alterations. Potentially targetable somatic alterations were identified in the majority of breast cancers. Paired testing is a feasible and efficient approach that delivers valuable information for the care of breast cancer patients and eliminates serial testing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cnr2.1287DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7941483PMC
December 2020

Prevalence of pathogenic variants in DNA damage response and repair genes in patients undergoing cancer risk assessment and reporting a personal history of early-onset renal cancer.

Sci Rep 2020 08 11;10(1):13518. Epub 2020 Aug 11.

Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Fox Chase Cancer Center, 333 Cottman Avenue, Philadelphia, PA, 19111-2497, USA.

Pathogenic variants (PVs) in multiple genes are known to increase the risk of early-onset renal cancer (eoRC). However, many eoRC patients lack PVs in RC-specific genes; thus, their genetic risk remains undefined. Here, we determine if PVs in DNA damage response and repair (DDRR) genes are enriched in eoRC patients undergoing cancer risk assessment. Retrospective review of de-identified results from 844 eoRC patients, undergoing testing with a multi-gene panel, for a variety of indications, by Ambry Genetics. PVs in cancer-risk genes were identified in 12.8% of patients-with 3.7% in RC-specific, and 8.55% in DDRR genes. DDRR gene PVs were most commonly identified in CHEK2, BRCA1, BRCA2, and ATM. Among the 2.1% of patients with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 PV, < 50% reported a personal history of hereditary breast or ovarian-associated cancer. No association between age of RC diagnosis and prevalence of PVs in RC-specific or DDRR genes was observed. Additionally, 57.9% patients reported at least one additional cancer; breast cancer being the most common (40.1% of females, 2.5% of males). Multi-gene testing including DDRR genes may provide a more comprehensive risk assessment in eoRC patients. Further validation is needed to characterize the association with eoRC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-70449-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7419503PMC
August 2020

Estimating the relative frequency of leukodystrophies and recommendations for carrier screening in the era of next-generation sequencing.

Am J Med Genet A 2020 08 23;182(8):1906-1912. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

Department of Neurology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Leukodystrophies are a heterogeneous group of heritable disorders characterized by abnormal brain white matter signal on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and primary involvement of the cellular components of myelin. Previous estimates suggest the incidence of leukodystrophies as a whole to be 1 in 7,000 individuals, however the frequency of specific diagnoses relative to others has not been described. Next generation sequencing approaches offer the opportunity to redefine our understanding of the relative frequency of different leukodystrophies. We assessed the relative frequency of all 30 leukodystrophies (associated with 55 genes) in more than 49,000 exomes. We identified a relatively high frequency of disorders previously thought of as very rare, including Aicardi Goutières Syndrome, TUBB4A-related leukodystrophy, Peroxisomal biogenesis disorders, POLR3-related Leukodystrophy, Vanishing White Matter, and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease. Despite the relative frequency of these conditions, carrier-screening laboratories regularly test only 20 of the 55 leukodystrophy-related genes, and do not test at all, or test only one or a few, genes for some of the higher frequency disorders. Relative frequency of leukodystrophies previously considered very rare suggests these disorders may benefit from expanded carrier screening.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.61641DOI Listing
August 2020

Clinical features and cancer risk in families with pathogenic variants irrespective of clinical criteria.

J Med Genet 2019 12 11;56(12):838-843. Epub 2019 Jul 11.

Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Background: The clinical phenotype of pathogenic variant carriers has mostly been studied in families that fulfil criteria of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). We aimed at determining cancer phenotype and cancer risk estimation among families with pathogenic variants not selected by HDGC clinical criteria.

Methods: Patients were all consecutively identified pathogenic variant carriers from a clinical laboratory tested with multigene panel testing and from an academic cancer genetics programme. Clinical and demographic features, cancer phenotypes and genotype-phenotype correlations were determined among families. Age-specific cumulative cancer risks (penetrance) were calculated based on 38 families with available pedigrees.

Results: Within the 113 pathogenic variant probands and 476 relatives, 113 had gastric cancer, 177 breast cancer and 196 other cancers. Mean age at diagnosis was 47 for gastric and 54 for breast cancer. Forty-six per cent fulfilled criteria of HDGC. While 36% of families had both gastric and breast cancers, 36% had breast but no gastric cancers and 16% had gastric but not breast cancers. Cumulative risk of cancer by age 80 was 37.2% for gastric and 42.9% for breast cancer.

Conclusion: In unselected pathogenic variant carrier families, gastric cancer risks were lower and age at diagnosis higher than previously reported in families pre-selected for HDGC criteria. A substantial proportion of families did not present with any gastric cancers and their cancers were limited to breast. Thus, clinical criteria for testing should be widened, including breast cancer families only, and a consideration for delayed prophylactic gastrectomy/surveillance should be evaluated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2019-105991DOI Listing
December 2019

Genotype-phenotype associations among panel-based TP53+ subjects.

Genet Med 2019 11 20;21(11):2478-2484. Epub 2019 May 20.

Department of Medical Oncology, Division of Population Sciences, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA.

Purpose: Panel testing has led to the identification of TP53 pathogenic/likely pathogenic (P/LP) variant carriers (TP53+) who exhibit a broad range of phenotypes. We sought to evaluate and compare genotype-phenotype associations among TP53+ panel-ascertained subjects.

Methods: Between 2012 and 2017, 317 TP53+ subjects (279 females and 38 males) identified through panel testing at one testing laboratory were found to have evaluable clinical histories and molecular results. Subject cancer histories were obtained from test requisition forms. P/LP variants were categorized by type and were examined in relation to phenotype.

Results: Loss-of-function (LOF) variants were associated with the earliest age at first cancer, with a median age of 30.5 years (P = 0.014); increased frequency of a sarcoma diagnosis (P = 0.016); and more often meeting classic LFS testing and Chompret 2015 criteria (P = 0.004 and 0.002 respectively), as compared with dominant-negative missense, other missense, or miscellaneous (splice or in-frame deletion) P/LP variant categories.

Conclusion: Loss-of-function variants were more often associated with characteristic LFS cancer histories than other variant categories in TP53+ carriers ascertained through multigene panel testing. These findings require validation in other TP53+ cohorts. Genetic counseling for panel-ascertained TP53+ individuals should reflect the dynamic expansion of the Li-Fraumeni syndrome phenotype.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-019-0541-yDOI Listing
November 2019

Family communication and patient distress after germline genetic testing in individuals with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

Cancer 2019 07 12;125(14):2488-2496. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Division of Hematology/Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.

Background: Germline genetic testing currently is recommended for patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). In the current study, the authors assessed how often results are communicated to first-degree relatives within 3 months and the emotional impact of testing on patients.

Methods: A total of 148 patients who were newly diagnosed with PDAC and who had undergone testing of 32 cancer susceptibility genes at 3 academic centers were selected; 71% participated. Subjects completed the Multidimensional Impact of Cancer Risk Assessment (MICRA) and a family communication survey. The results of both surveys were assessed at 3 months according to the genetic test result (positive, negative, or variant of unknown significance [VUS]) and whether a patient met criteria for genetic testing.

Results: A total of 99 patients completed the MICRA survey and 104 completed the family communication survey. The average age of the patients was 67 years, 47% were female, 29% had stage III/IV (AJCC 8th edition) disease, and 42% met genetic testing criteria. Approximately 80% of patients told at least 1 first-degree relative about their result. There was a trend toward greater disclosure among patients who tested positive (93% vs 77% for those with a VUS result [P = .149] and 74% for those who tested negative [P = .069]). Patients not meeting genetic testing criteria were less likely to disclose results (69% vs 93%; P = .003). MICRA scores did not differ by test result, age, stage of disease, or sex.

Conclusions: The rate of result communication was high, although it was lower among patients who did not meet genetic testing criteria, those who tested negative, or those who had a VUS result. Testing-associated distress was similar across patient groups, and was comparable to that reported by other patients with cancer. Improved communication for all patients is crucial given the prognosis of PDAC, which limits time for disclosure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.32077DOI Listing
July 2019

Prevalence of germline variants in inflammatory breast cancer.

Cancer 2019 07 1;125(13):2194-2202. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Background: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an uncommon and aggressive subtype of breast cancer associated with early disease recurrence and short survival. The prevalence of germline variants in cancer predisposition genes has not been systematically evaluated in women with IBC.

Methods: Among 301 women enrolled in the clinical IBC registry at a single institution between 2010 and 2017, 168 had documented genetic testing. A second cohort of 200 IBC cases who had panel-based germline testing performed through a commercial testing laboratory from 2012 to 2017 was added to the analyses. Personal and family cancer histories and genetic testing results were evaluated when they were available for both cohorts.

Results: Among 501 IBC cases, 368 had documented genetic testing. Germline mutations (56 total) were identified in 53 cases (14.4%). BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations were found in 7.3% of the subjects, 6.3% had a mutation in other breast cancer genes (PALB2, CHEK2, ATM, and BARD1), and 1.6% had mutations in genes not associated with breast cancer. The prevalence of mutations was 24% (22 of 92) among women with triple-negative IBC, 13% (13 of 99) among women with estrogen receptor- and/or progesterone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative disease, and 9.3% (10 of 108) among women with HER2-positive IBC.

Conclusions: The prevalence and diversity of germline genetic mutations among patients with IBC suggest that further studies should be performed to assess the role of inherited mutations in IBC carcinogenesis in comparison with non-IBC breast cancer. Since IBC has a high metastatic potential associated with poor prognostic outcomes, proposed future studies may also inform targeted treatment options.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.32062DOI Listing
July 2019

Prospective study of germline genetic testing in incident cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

Cancer 2018 09 1;124(17):3520-3527. Epub 2018 Aug 1.

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.

Background: The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of pathogenic germline variants (PGVs) in 32 cancer susceptibility genes in individuals with newly diagnosed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). A key secondary objective was to evaluate how often PGVs would have been undetected with existing genetic testing criteria.

Methods: From May 2016 through May 2017, this multicenter cohort study enrolled consecutive patients aged 18 to 89 years with histologically confirmed PDAC diagnosed within the previous 12 weeks. Demographics, medical histories, and 3-generation pedigrees were collected from participants who provided samples for germline DNA analysis.

Results: Four hundred nineteen patients were deemed eligible, 302 were enrolled, and 298 were included in the final cohort. Clinically actionable variants were reported in 29 PDAC patients (9.7%), with 23 (7.7%) having a PGV associated with an increased risk for PDAC. Six of 23 individuals (26%) with PDAC-associated gene mutations did not meet currently established genetic testing criteria. According to guideline-based genetic testing, only 11 of the 23 PGVs (48%) in known PDAC genes would have been detected. Six additional patients (2%) had PGVs associated with an increased risk for other cancers.

Conclusions: These findings support the significant prevalence of PGVs associated with PDAC and the limitations of current paradigms for selecting patients for genetic testing, and they thereby lend support for universal germline multigene genetic testing in this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.31628DOI Listing
September 2018

Exome sequencing in neonates: diagnostic rates, characteristics, and time to diagnosis.

Genet Med 2018 11 22;20(11):1468-1471. Epub 2018 Mar 22.

Ambry Genetics, Aliso Viejo, California, USA.

Purpose: Neonatal patients are particularly appropriate for utilization of diagnostic exome sequencing (DES), as many Mendelian diseases are known to present in this period of life but often with complex, heterogeneous features. We attempted to determine the diagnostic rates and features of neonatal patients undergoing DES.

Methods: The clinical histories and results of 66 neonatal patients undergoing DES were retrospectively reviewed.

Results: Clinical DES identified potentially relevant findings in 25 patients (37.9%). The majority of patients had structural anomalies such as birth defects, dysmorphic features, cardiac, craniofacial, and skeletal defects. The average time for clinical rapid testing was 8 days.

Conclusion: Our observations demonstrate the utility of family-based exome sequencing in neonatal patients, including familial cosegregation analysis and comprehensive medical review.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/gim.2018.11DOI Listing
November 2018

Differences in TP53 Mutation Carrier Phenotypes Emerge From Panel-Based Testing.

J Natl Cancer Inst 2018 08;110(8):863-870

Division of Population Sciences, Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA.

Background: Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) has traditionally been identified by single-gene testing (SGT) of TP53 triggered by clinical criteria, but the widespread use of multigene panel tests (MGPTs) has upended this paradigm. We sought to compare the personal and family cancer histories of TP53-positive result (TP53+) carriers who were identified by either MGPT or SGT.

Methods: Of 44 310 individuals who underwent testing of TP53 in a single clinical diagnostic laboratory between 2010 and 2014, 44 086 (40 885 MGPT and 3201 SGT) met study eligibility criteria. Personal cancer histories were available for 38 938 subjects. The frequency of germline TP53 results and various phenotypic manifestations were compared according to test type. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results: MGPT TP53+ individuals (n = 126) had an older median age at first cancer than SGT TP53+ carriers (n = 96; women: median = 36 vs 28 years, P < .001; and men: median = 40 vs 15 years, P = .004). The median age of breast cancer diagnosis was 40 years in MGPT TP53+ women vs 33 years in SGT TP53+ women (P < .001). In both cohorts, childhood and LFS core cancers, and for women, multiple primary cancers (not multiple breast tumors), were associated with TP53+ results. Established LFS testing criteria were less often met by MGPT TP53+ individuals.

Conclusions: MGPT TP53+ individuals differ in phenotype from those ascertained through SGT and are notably older at cancer diagnosis and less likely to meet LFS clinical criteria. These findings suggest that LFS may have a greater phenotypic spectrum than previously appreciated. This has implications for the counseling of MGPT TP53+ individuals. Prospective follow-up of these individuals and families is needed to re-evaluate cancer risks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djy001DOI Listing
August 2018

Somatic TP53 variants frequently confound germ-line testing results.

Genet Med 2018 08 30;20(8):809-816. Epub 2017 Nov 30.

Ambry Genetics, Aliso Viejo, California, USA.

Purpose: Blood/saliva DNA is thought to represent the germ line in genetic cancer-risk assessment. Cases with pathogenic TP53 variants detected by multigene panel testing are often discordant with Li-Fraumeni syndrome, raising concern about misinterpretation of acquired aberrant clonal expansions (ACEs) with TP53 variants as germ-line results.

Methods: Pathogenic TP53 variants with abnormal next-generation sequencing metrics (e.g., decreased ratio (<25%) of mutant to wild-type allele, more than two detected alleles) were selected from a CLIA laboratory testing cohort. Alternate tissues and/or close relatives were tested to distinguish between ACE and germ-line status. Clinical data and Li-Fraumeni syndrome testing criteria were examined.

Results: Among 114,630 multigene panel tests and 1,454 TP53 gene-specific analyses, abnormal next-generation sequencing metrics were observed in 20% of 353 TP53-positive results, and ACE was confirmed for 91% of cases with ancillary materials, most of these due to clonal hematopoiesis. Only four met Chompret criteria. Individuals with ACE were older (50 years vs. 33.7; P = 0.02) and were identified more frequently in multigene panel tests (66/285; 23.2%) than in TP53 gene-specific tests (6/68; 8.8%, P = 0.005).

Conclusion: ACE confounds germ-line diagnosis, may portend hematologic malignancy, and may provoke unwarranted clinical interventions. Ancillary testing to confirm germ-line status should precede Li-Fraumeni syndrome management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/gim.2017.196DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5976505PMC
August 2018

Unexpected Mutations Identified on Multigene Panels Pose Clinical Management Challenges.

JCO Precis Oncol 2017 Nov;1:1-12

Katrina Lowstuter, Duveen Sturgeon, Charité Ricker, Julie O. Culver, Julia Sturgeon, Yanling Ma, Marilena Melas, Gregory E. Idos, Kevin J. McDonnell, and Stephen B. Gruber, University of Southern California, Los Angeles; Carin R. Espenschied, Rachid Karam, Holly LaDuca, Jill S. Dolinsky, Elizabeth Chao, and Virginia Speare, Ambry Genetics, Aliso Viejo; and Kerry Kingham, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA.

Purpose: Mutations in the gene confer up to an 80% lifetime risk of diffuse gastric cancer and up to a 60% lifetime risk of lobular breast cancer. Testing for mutations is recommended for individuals who meet the International Gastric Cancer Linkage Consortium (IGCLC) guidelines. However, the interpretation of unexpected mutations identified in patients who do not meet IGCLC criteria or do not have phenotypes suggestive of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is clinically challenging. This study aims to describe phenotypes of mutation carriers identified through multigene panel testing (MGPT) and to offer informed recommendations for medical management.

Patients And Methods: This cross-sectional prevalence study included all patients who underwent MGPT between March 2012 and September 2014 from a commercial laboratory (n = 26,936) and an academic medical center cancer genetics clinic (n = 318) to estimate mutation prevalence and associated clinical phenotypes. mutation carriers were classified as IGCLC positive (met criteria), IGCLC partial phenotype, and IGCLC negative.

Results: In the laboratory cohort, 16 (0.06%) of 26,936 patients were identified as having a pathogenic mutation. In the clinic cohort, four (1.26%) of 318 had a pathogenic mutation. Overall, 65% of mutation carriers did not meet the revised testing criteria published in 2015. All three mutation carriers who had risk-reducing gastrectomy had pathologic evidence of diffuse gastric cancer despite not having met IGCLC criteria.

Conclusion: The majority of mutations identified on MGPT are unexpected and found in individuals who do not fit the accepted diagnostic testing criteria. These test results alter the medical management of -positive patients and families and provide opportunities for early detection and risk reduction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/PO.16.00021DOI Listing
November 2017

Utilization of multigene panels in hereditary cancer predisposition testing: analysis of more than 2,000 patients.

Genet Med 2014 Nov 24;16(11):830-7. Epub 2014 Apr 24.

1] Department of Clinical Diagnostics, Ambry Genetics, Aliso Viejo, California, USA [2] Division of Genetics and Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California, USA.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and molecular characteristics of 2,079 patients who underwent hereditary cancer multigene panel testing.

Methods: Panels included comprehensive analysis of 14-22 cancer susceptibility genes (BRCA1 and BRCA2 not included), depending on the panel ordered (BreastNext, OvaNext, ColoNext, or CancerNext). Next-generation sequencing and deletion/duplication analyses were performed for all genes except EPCAM (deletion/duplication analysis only). Clinical histories of ColoNext patients harboring mutations in genes with well-established diagnostic criteria were assessed to determine whether diagnostic/testing criteria were met.

Results: Positive rates were defined as the proportion of patients with a pathogenic mutation/likely pathogenic variant(s) and were as follows: 7.4% for BreastNext, 7.2% for OvaNext, 9.2% for ColoNext, and 9.6% for CancerNext. Inconclusive results were found in 19.8% of BreastNext, 25.6% of OvaNext, 15.1% of ColoNext, and 23.5% of CancerNext tests. Based on information submitted by clinicians, 30% of ColoNext patients with mutations in genes with well-established diagnostic criteria did not meet corresponding criteria.

Conclusion: Our data point to an important role for targeted multigene panels in diagnosing hereditary cancer predisposition, particularly for patients with clinical histories spanning several possible diagnoses and for patients with suspicious clinical histories not meeting diagnostic criteria for a specific hereditary cancer syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/gim.2014.40DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4225457PMC
November 2014
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