Publications by authors named "Virginia H Mackintosh"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

How many doctors does it take to make an autism spectrum diagnosis?

Autism 2006 Sep;10(5):439-51

Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Parents of children with pervasive developmental disorders (n = 494) were surveyed to determine their level of satisfaction with the process of getting an autism spectrum diagnosis. Participants in this web-based study (mean age = 37.8 years) came from five countries and reported on children with an average age of 8.3 years (range = 1.7 to 22.1). All children had a diagnosis of either autism (59.9%), Asperger syndrome (23.5%), or PDD-NOS (16.6%). Higher levels of parental education and income were associated with earlier diagnosis and greater satisfaction with the diagnostic process. Parents were more satisfied with the diagnostic process when they saw fewer professionals to get the diagnosis and when the children received the diagnoses at younger ages.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1362361306066601DOI Listing
September 2006

Hope, social support, and behavioral problems in at-risk children.

Am J Orthopsychiatry 2005 Apr;75(2):211-9

Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284-2018, USA.

This study investigated the effects of hope, social support, and stress on behavioral problems in a high-risk group of 65 children of incarcerated mothers. Children with low levels of hope had more externalizing and internalizing problems. Children who perceived less social support had more externalizing problems, and children who had experienced more life stressors reported more internalizing problems. Regression analyses indicated that hope contributed unique variance to both internalizing and externalizing behavioral problems after social support and stress were controlled. These findings suggest that being confident in one's ability to overcome challenges and having a positive outlook function as protective factors, whereas being less hopeful may place a child at risk for developing adjustment problems. Whether it is possible to foster agency and teach pathways to children with lower levels of hope is discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0002-9432.75.2.211DOI Listing
April 2005