Publications by authors named "Vincent Fregona"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The CADM1 tumor suppressor gene is a major candidate gene in MDS with deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11.

Blood Adv 2021 Oct 12. Epub 2021 Oct 12.

Belgian Cancer Registry, Brussels, Belgium.

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic stem-cell disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis leading to peripheral cytopenias and in a substantial proportion of cases to acute myeloid leukemia. The deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11, del(11q), is a rare but recurrent clonal event in MDS. Here, we detail the largest series of 113 cases of MDS and myelodysplastic syndromes/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) harboring a del(11q) analyzed at clinical, cytological, cytogenetic and molecular levels. Female predominance, a survival prognosis similar to other MDS, a low monocyte count and dysmegakaryopoiesis were the specific clinical and cytological features of del(11q) MDS. In most cases, del(11q) was isolated, primary and interstitial encompassing the 11q22-23 region containing ATM, KMT2A and CBL genes. The common deleted region at 11q23.2 is centered on an intergenic region between CADM1 (also known as TSLC1, Tumour Suppressor in Lung Cancer 1) and NXPE2. CADM1 was expressed in all myeloid cells analyzed in contrast to NXPE2. At the functional level, the deletion of Cadm1 in murine Lineage-Sca1+Kit+ cells modifies the lymphoid to myeloid ratio in bone marrow although not altering their multi-lineage hematopoietic reconstitution potential after syngenic transplantation. Together with the frequent simultaneous deletions of KMT2A, ATM and CBL and mutations of ASXL1, SF3B1 and CBL, we show that CADM1 may be important in the physiopathology of the del(11q) MDS, extending its role as tumor-suppressor gene from solid tumors to hematopoietic malignancies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2021005311DOI Listing
October 2021

PAX5-ELN oncoprotein promotes multistep B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in mice.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2018 10 26;115(41):10357-10362. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Centre de Recherches en Cancérologie de Toulouse (CRCT), Université de Toulouse, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), Université Toulouse III Paul Sabatier (UPS), 31037 Toulouse, France;

is a well-known haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene in human B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and is involved in various chromosomal translocations that fuse a part of PAX5 with other partners. However, the role of PAX5 fusion proteins in B-ALL initiation and transformation is ill-known. We previously reported a new recurrent t(7;9)(q11;p13) chromosomal translocation in human B-ALL that juxtaposed to the coding sequence of elastin (). To study the function of the resulting PAX5-ELN fusion protein in B-ALL development, we generated a knockin mouse model in which the transgene is expressed specifically in B cells. PAX5-ELN-expressing mice efficiently developed B-ALL with an incidence of 80%. Leukemic transformation was associated with recurrent secondary mutations on , , , and genes affecting key signaling pathways required for cell proliferation. Our functional studies demonstrate that PAX5-ELN affected B-cell development in vitro and in vivo featuring an aberrant expansion of the pro-B cell compartment at the preleukemic stage. Finally, our molecular and computational approaches identified PAX5-ELN-regulated gene candidates that establish the molecular bases of the preleukemic state to drive B-ALL initiation. Hence, our study provides a new in vivo model of human B-ALL and strongly implicates PAX5 fusion proteins as potent oncoproteins in leukemia development.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1721678115DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6187160PMC
October 2018
-->