Publications by authors named "Vikas Mahavni"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Assessment of p53 gene transfer and biological activities in a clinical study of adenovirus-p53 gene therapy for recurrent ovarian cancer.

Cancer Gene Ther 2003 Mar;10(3):224-38

Canji, Inc., San Diego, California 92121, USA.

A cohort study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of gene transfer and whether biological activity from the expressed therapeutic gene resulted after administration of a recombinant adenovirus containing the human wild-type p53 (p53(wt)) gene (rAd-p53 SCH 58500). The cohort study was conducted in five trial subjects with recurrent ovarian cancer. Each trial subject received multiple cycles of rAd-p53 SCH 58500, each cycle comprised of doses of 7.5 x 10(13) particles on each of five consecutive days. Subjects were treated with rAd-p53 SCH 58500 alone during Cycle 1 and in combination with gemcitabine during the subsequent cycles. Both tumor biopsies and peritoneal aspirates were collected and evaluated for gene transfer and evidence of the biological activities of the expressed p53(wt) gene. Using quantitative PCR and RT-PCR, and in situ PCR, gene transfer and expression were documented in tumor biopsies (four of five patients) collected from Cycle 1. Furthermore, upregulation of p21/WAF1, bax and mdm-2, and downregulation of survivin were observed in these same tumor biopsy samples, suggesting that intraperitoneal administration of rAd-p53 SCH 58500 leads to detectable p53 biological activity in target tumor tissue. In addition, gene transfer and its expression were observed in cells obtained from peritoneal aspirates. These fluids were mainly comprised of polymorphonuclear neutrophils, indicating that successful gene transfer can be achieved by multiple cycle intraperitoneal administration of recombinant adenovirus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.cgt.7700562DOI Listing
March 2003

Allopathic and complementary alternatives to hormone replacement therapy.

Expert Opin Pharmacother 2002 Jul;3(7):949-55

Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA.

Management of the menopause is a rapidly growing concern due to the ageing human population. The overall female lifespan has increased over the last century and up to a third of a woman's life is now spent in menopause. To that end, significant attention has been placed on maximising the quantity and quality of life in the menopausal years. The optimal management strategies are ones that are highly flexible and sensitive to an individual's expectations and concerns. Thus, while traditional oestrogen replacement therapy has been in place for > 20 years, there is now a greater interest in alternatives to this modality for those women who cannot or will not use it. This article reviews some of the alternative therapies that are being incorporated both in the allopathic and complementary medicine arenas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1517/14656566.3.7.949DOI Listing
July 2002

Long term follow-up of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer after Ad p53 gene replacement with SCH 58500.

Cancer Gene Ther 2002 Jul;9(7):567-72

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1009, USA.

Objective: We have previously reported the safety, efficient gene transfer, and favorable CA125 responses of individuals with recurrent ovarian cancer treated by p53 gene replacement with the adenoviral vector SCH 58500. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate the long-term follow-up of these heavily pretreated patients subsequent to SCH 58500 dosing.

Methods: Patients (n=36) were treated with either single-dose SCH 58500 in the phase I study or with multiple doses (MD) of SCH 58500 over multiple cycles in combination of platinum-based chemotherapy in the phase I/II portion of the study. Five patients were initially treated in the single-dose group and re-enrolled in the MD group. The MD group was evaluated both without the re-enrolled patients as MD1 (n=19), and as MD2 (n=24), which included them. Patients who were only treated on the single-dose arm were designated as SD (n=12). Most patients received additional chemotherapy at the discretion of their physicians on completion of the trial. The current analysis is a retrospective sequential cohort survival analysis.

Results: The first patient was treated in March 1997 and the last patient completed SCH 58500 in September 1998. There was no difference in age at diagnosis, Karnofsky performance status, interval between diagnosis to SCH 58500, prior cycles or regimen of chemotherapy, platinum-free interval, percent platinum refractory patients, pretreatment CA125, or largest tumor volume between groups. Both MD groups had a slightly longer chemotherapy-free interval before SCH 58500 than the SD group. Median survival of individuals who received MD SCH 58500 with chemotherapy was 12-13.0 months, compared to only 5 months for those treated with SD SCH 58500. There are 10 long-term survivors more than 20 months after MD treatment for recurrent disease compared to only 2 long-term survivors after SD SCH 58500.

Conclusion: The 12- to 13.0-month median survival in a heavily pretreated population with recurrent ovarian cancer compares favorably to the 16-month median survival for individuals treated with paclitaxel at the time of initial recurrence of this disease and is more than double the 5-month survival seen with palliative radiotherapy or paclitaxel failure. These data suggest that further study of SCH58500 is clearly indicated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.cgt.7700473DOI Listing
July 2002
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