Publications by authors named "Vidya Krishna"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Role for Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in Melioidosis.

Indian J Nucl Med 2021 Jul-Sep;36(3):354-356. Epub 2021 Sep 23.

Department of Microbiology, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, SRIHER, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijnm.ijnm_227_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8481842PMC
September 2021

Screening for antenatal GBS carriage in India.

Indian J Med Microbiol 2021 07 7;39(3):395. Epub 2021 Jun 7.

Department of Infectious Diseases, Apollo Hospitals, Chennai, India. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijmmb.2021.05.018DOI Listing
July 2021

Autoptic identification of disseminated mucormycosis in a young male presenting with cerebrovascular event, multi-organ dysfunction and COVID-19 infection.

IDCases 2021 28;25:e01172. Epub 2021 May 28.

Department of Respiratory Medicine, Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospital, Guy's and St.Thomas Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.

Among the secondary fungal infections in Coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) infection, Aspergillosis has been reported more often than Mucormycosis. Disseminated mucormycosis is almost always a disease of severely immunosuppressed hosts. We report a young obese Asian male who was admitted with an acute anterior cerebral artery (ACA) territory infarct and severe COVID-19 pneumonitis to the intensive care unit (ICU). He had a complicated stay with recurrent episodes of vasoplegic shock and multi-organ dysfunction. At autopsy, he was confirmed to have disseminated mucormycosis. We believe this to be the first documented case of disseminated mucormycosis in an immunocompetent host with COVID-19 infection. The lack of sensitive non-invasive modalities and biomarkers to diagnose mucormycosis, along with the extremely high mortality in untreated cases, present a unique challenge to clinicians dealing with critically ill patients with COVID-19.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.idcr.2021.e01172DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8161734PMC
May 2021

COVID-19 mortality in cancer patients: a report from a tertiary cancer centre in India.

PeerJ 2021 21;9:e10599. Epub 2021 Jan 21.

Department of Research, Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Centre, New Delhi, Delhi, India.

Background: Cancer patients, especially those receiving cytotoxic therapy, are assumed to have a higher probability of death from COVID-19. We have conducted this study to identify the Case Fatality Rate (CFR) in cancer patients with COVID-19 and have explored the relationship of various clinical factors to mortality in our patient cohort.

Methods: All confirmed cancer cases presented to the hospital from June 8 to August 20, 2020, and developed symptoms/radiological features suspicious of COVID-19 were tested by Real-time polymerase chain reaction assay and/or cartridge-based nucleic acid amplification test from a combination of naso-oropharyngeal swab for SARS-CoV-2. Clinical data, treatment details, and outcomes were assessed from the medical records.

Results: Of the total 3,101 cancer patients admitted to the hospital, 1,088 patients were tested and 186 patients were positive for SARS-CoV-2. The CFR in the cohort was 27/186 (14.52%). Univariate analysis showed that the risk of death was significantly associated with the presence of any comorbidity (OR: 2.68; (95% CI [1.13-6.32]); = 0.025), multiple comorbidities (OR: 3.01; (95% CI [1.02-9.07]); = 0.047 for multiple vs. single), and the severity of COVID-19 presentation (OR: 27.48; (95% CI [5.34-141.49]); < 0.001 for severe vs. not severe symptoms). Among all comorbidities, diabetes (OR: 3.31; (95% CI [1.35-8.09]); = 0.009) and cardiovascular diseases (OR: 3.77; (95% CI [1.02-13.91]); = 0.046) were significant risk factors for death. Anticancer treatments including chemotherapy, surgery, radiotherapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy administered within a month before the onset of COVID-19 symptoms had no significant effect on mortality.

Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study from India reporting the CFR, clinical associations, and risk factors for mortality in SARS-CoV-2 infected cancer patients. Our study shows that the frequency of COVID-19 in cancer patients is high. Recent anticancer therapies are not associated with mortality. Pre-existing comorbidities, especially diabetes, multiple comorbidities, and severe symptoms at presentation are significantly linked with COVID-19 related death in the cohort.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.10599DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7827973PMC
January 2021

Clinical and Genetic Spectrum of a Large Cohort of Patients With Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type 1 and 3: A Multicentric Study From India.

Front Immunol 2020 16;11:612703. Epub 2020 Dec 16.

Department of pediatric, Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health, Bangalore, India.

Leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) syndrome is a group of inborn errors of immunity characterized by a defect in the cascade of the activation and adhesion leading to the failure of leukocyte to migrate to the site of tissue injury. Three different types of LAD have been described. The most common subtype is LAD type 1 (LAD1) caused due to defects in the gene. LAD type 2 (LAD2) is caused by mutations in the gene leading to a generalized loss of expression of fucosylated glycans on the cell surface and LAD type 3 (LAD3) is caused by mutations in the gene resulting in platelet function defects along with immunodeficiency. There is a paucity of data available from India on LAD syndromes. The present study is a retrospective analysis of patients with LAD collated from 28 different centers across India. For LAD1, the diagnosis was based on clinical features and flow cytometric expression of CD18 on peripheral blood leukocytes and molecular confirmation by Sanger sequencing. For patients with LAD3 diagnosis was largely based on clinical manifestations and identification of the pathogenic mutation in the gene by next-generation Sequencing. Of the total 132 cases diagnosed with LAD, 127 were LAD1 and 5 were LAD3. The majority of our patients (83%) had CD18 expression less than 2% on neutrophils (LAD1°) and presented within the first three months of life with omphalitis, skin and soft tissue infections, delayed umbilical cord detachment, otitis media, and sepsis. The patients with CD18 expression of more than 30% (LAD1) presented later in life with skin ulcers being the commonest manifestation. Bleeding manifestations were common in patients with LAD3. Persistent neutrophilic leukocytosis was the characteristic finding in all patients. 35 novel mutations were detected in the gene, and 4 novel mutations were detected in the gene. The study thus presents one of the largest cohorts of patients from India with LAD, focusing on clinical features, immunological characteristics, and molecular spectrum.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2020.612703DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7772426PMC
June 2021

Acquired Recto-Vaginal Fistula as a Presenting Feature in an Infant with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency.

Indian Pediatr 2020 06;57(6):571-572

Department of Paediatric Surgery, Sri Ramachandra Institute of Higher Education and Research, Chennai, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2020

Utility of Xpert MTB/RIF in the diagnosis of extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

Indian J Med Microbiol 2019 Jul-Sep;37(3):448-449

Department of Infectious Diseases, Apollo Hospitals, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijmm.IJMM_19_149DOI Listing
June 2020

Clinical, Immunological, and Molecular Findings in 57 Patients With Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) From India.

Front Immunol 2019 4;10:23. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Pediatric Immunology and Leukocyte Biology, National Institute of Immunohaematology (ICMR), Mumbai, India.

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) represents one of the most severe forms of primary immunodeficiency (PID) disorders characterized by impaired cellular and humoral immune responses. Here, we report the clinical, immunological, and molecular findings in 57 patients diagnosed with SCID from India. Majority of our patients (89%) presented within 6 months of age. The most common clinical manifestations observed were recurrent pneumonia (66%), failure to thrive (60%), chronic diarrhea (35%), gastrointestinal infection (21%), and oral candidiasis (21%). Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative therapy available for treating these patients. Four patients underwent HSCT in our cohort but had a poor survival outcome. Lymphopenia (absolute lymphocyte counts/μL <2,500) was noted in 63% of the patients. Based on immunophenotypic pattern, majority of the cases were TB SCID (39%) followed by TB SCID (28%). MHC class II deficiency accounted for 10.5% of our patient group. A total of 49 patients were molecularly characterized in this study and 32 novel variants were identified in our cohort. The spectrum of genetic defects in our cohort revealed a wide genetic heterogeneity with the major genetic cause being gene defect ( = 12) followed by ( = 9) and defects ( = 9). Rare forms of SCID like Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiency, reticular dysgenesis, DNA-Protein Kinase (DNA-PKcs) deficiency, six cases of MHC class II deficiency and two ZAP70 deficiency were also identified in our cohort. Fourteen percent of the defects still remained uncharacterized despite the application of next generation sequencing. With the exception of MHC class II deficiency and ZAP70 deficiency, all SCID patients had extremely low T cell receptor excision (TRECs) (<18 copies/μL).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2019.00023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6369708PMC
December 2019

Vitamin D Deficiency as a Factor Influencing Asthma Control in Children.

Indian Pediatr 2018 Nov;55(11):969-971

Department of Pediatrics, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Chennai, India. Correspondence to: Dr Padmasani Venkat Ramanan, Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Chennai 600 116, India.

Objective: To study the association between asthma control and serum 25OH Vitamin D levels in children with moderate persistent asthma on preventer therapy.

Methods: Children aged 6-18 years, with moderate persistent asthma, on preventer therapy for ≥2 months were included. Control was categorized as good, partial or poor as per GINA guidelines. Serum 25 (OH) Vitamin D levels were measured and their relationship with the level of control was studied.

Results: Out of 50 children enrolled, 22 had well-controlled asthma, and 21 had partially controlled asthma. Vitamin D was deficient in 30 children and insufficient in 18 children. Children with vitamin D deficiency had significantly less well-controlled asthma as compared to those with insufficient or sufficient levels of 25 (OH) vitamin D (13.3% vs 88.9% vs 100%).

Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with suboptimal asthma control.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2018

Partial splenic artery embolization for the management of hypersplenism in cirrhosis.

Indian Pediatr 2015 Aug;52(8):718-9

Department of Pediatrics, Sri Ramachandra Medical College, Porur, Chennai, TN, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2015

Changing profile of pediatric community-acquired UTI in a hospital in South India.

J Trop Pediatr 2014 Dec 16;60(6):483. Epub 2014 Sep 16.

Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Porur, Chennai, Pediatrics

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tropej/fmu048DOI Listing
December 2014

Streptococcal Toxic Shock syndrome.

Indian J Pediatr 2014 Sep 3;81(9):946-8. Epub 2013 Dec 3.

Department of Pediatrics, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Hospital, Porur, Chennai, 600116, India.

Streptococcal Toxic Shock syndrome (STSS) is a serious complication caused by exotoxins of Group A Streptococcus (GAS). It presents with fulminant shock and rash, is rapidly progressive with Multi-Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS) and requires aggressive therapy with fluids, antibiotics and source control.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12098-013-1272-8DOI Listing
September 2014

Enteric fever in children below 2 y--need for an effective conjugate vaccine?

Indian J Pediatr 2014 May 14;81(5):511. Epub 2013 Sep 14.

Department of Pediatrics, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Porur, Chennai, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12098-013-1223-4DOI Listing
May 2014

Heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation of methanol over uranyl-anchored nanoporous MCM-41 and MCM-48.

J Nanosci Nanotechnol 2006 Jun;6(6):1811-4

Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076, India.

The vapor-phase photodegradation of methanol to carbon dioxide was carried out over uranyl-anchored nanoporous MCM-41 and MCM-48 hosts (designated as UO2(2+)/MCM-41 and UO2(2+)/MCM-48, respectively) under simulated light and ambient conditions. Preliminary results indicate that the photoactivity of the latter is considerably decreased as compared to the former due to the presence of a smaller fraction of photoactive uranyl (UO2(2+)) ions in UO2(2+)/MCM-48.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1166/jnn.2006.226DOI Listing
June 2006
-->