Publications by authors named "Vidula V Sukhatme"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Fluvoxamine: A Review of Its Mechanism of Action and Its Role in COVID-19.

Front Pharmacol 2021 20;12:652688. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

GlobalCures, Inc., Newton, MA, United States.

Fluvoxamine is a well-tolerated, widely available, inexpensive selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that has been shown in a small, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study to prevent clinical deterioration of patients with mild coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Fluvoxamine is also an agonist for the sigma-1 receptor, through which it controls inflammation. We review here a body of literature that shows important mechanisms of action of fluvoxamine and other SSRIs that could play a role in COVID-19 treatment. These effects include: reduction in platelet aggregation, decreased mast cell degranulation, interference with endolysosomal viral trafficking, regulation of inositol-requiring enzyme 1α-driven inflammation and increased melatonin levels, which collectively have a direct antiviral effect, regulate coagulopathy or mitigate cytokine storm, which are known hallmarks of severe COVID-19.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2021.652688DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8094534PMC
April 2021

Reducing injury response to surgery with repurposed drugs: An evolving approach to prevention of cancer metastases.

Cancer 2020 09 13;126(17):3916-3918. Epub 2020 Jun 13.

Morningside Center for Innovative and Affordable Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.32949DOI Listing
September 2020

Repurposing Food and Drug Administration-Approved Drugs to Promote Antitumor Immunity.

Cancer J 2019 Mar/Apr;25(2):88-99

Center for Affordable Medical Innovation and Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA.

There has been a major resurgence of interest in immune-based approaches to treat cancer, based largely on the success of checkpoint inhibitors (anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, anti-programmed cell death 1, and anti-programmed cell death ligand 1 antibodies) in several malignancies. However, not all tumors respond to checkpoint therapy, and there is clearly a need for additional approaches for enhancing tumor immunity. We summarize the critical elements necessary for mounting an efficacious T-cell response to a tumor. We cite drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration for no-cancer indications that could be repurposed and used as part of an antitumor immune cocktail. We also list cancer drugs not initially intended to impact tumor immunity (soft repurposing) but that have been found to modulate the immune system. We highlight those drugs that might be used in combination with checkpoint inhibitors to increase response rates and survival of cancer patients. Our focus will be on drugs for which there are limited but existing human data. We cite supporting mechanistic mouse data as well. Repurposing drugs to modulate antitumor immunity is an opportunity to rapidly bring new, effective, and affordable treatments to cancer patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PPO.0000000000000368DOI Listing
July 2020