Publications by authors named "Victoria Areal-Quecuty"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Use of contemporary technologies and new materials in undergraduate Endodontics teaching.

J Clin Exp Dent 2021 Apr 1;13(4):e383-e388. Epub 2021 Apr 1.

DDS, MSc, Doctoral fellow, Department of Stomatology, Section of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Sevilla, C/ Avicena s/n, 41009-Sevilla, Spain.

Background: This study aims to analyze the use of contemporary technologies and materials in undergraduate endodontic teaching in Spain.

Material And Methods: The survey was sent to the undergraduate endodontic programme leads in the 23 Spanish dental schools. The survey asked about the use of magnification, ultrasonic devices, electronic apex locator, rotary instruments, root-filling techniques, and bioceramic cements in the teaching of endodontics.

Results: The response rate was 91%, and the final number of schools included in the study was twenty. Only two schools (10%) used magnification (loupes or operative microscope). Five schools (25%) used ultrasonic devices to prepare the access cavity, and four (20%) to activate the irrigation solution. In 14 dental schools (70%) no type of ultrasonic instrument was used. Electronic apex locators in working length determination was used in 19 schools (95%). All schools used rotary instrumentation in the teaching of endodontics, and 45% of schools used reciprocating instruments. Five schools (25%) used warm vertical compaction technique, four (20%) single cone gutta-percha technique, and four (20%) thermoplastic injection techniques. No school used carrier-based gutta-percha. Bioceramic cements were used in 19 of the schools (95%).

Conclusions: Spanish dental schools have incorporated some of the new endodontic technologies and materials, including the electronic apex locator, rotary instruments, and the new bioceramic cements; however, the modern root filling techniques, magnification, and ultrasonic instruments are not yet used in most dental schools. Bioceramic materials, dental schools, endodontic curriculum, magnification, online survey, rotary instrumentation, ultrasonic devices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4317/jced.57795DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8020320PMC
April 2021

Smoking and Radiolucent Periapical Lesions in Root Filled Teeth: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

J Clin Med 2020 Oct 29;9(11). Epub 2020 Oct 29.

Department of Stomatology, Section of Comprehensive Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Sevilla, 41009 Sevilla, Spain.

Aim: This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to investigate the association between smoking habits and the prevalence of radiolucent periapical lesions (RPLs) in root-filled teeth (RFT).

Methods: The Population, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome (PICO) question was: in adult patients who have RFT, does the absence or presence of a smoking habit affect the prevalence of RPLs associated with RFT? Systematic MEDLINE/PubMed, Wiley Online Database, Web of Science, Scopus, and PRISMA protocol were used to evaluate and present the results. Studies comparing smokers with control non-smoker subjects, including RFT, and providing data on the prevalence of RFT with RPLs, were included. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used for certainty in the evidence. The risk of bias was assessed according to Cochrane Collaboration common scheme for bias and ROBINS-I tool. Cumulative meta-analysis was performed with a random effects model. PROSPERO registration code: CRD42020165279.

Results: Four studies reported data on inclusion criteria, representing data from 9257 root-filled teeth-4465 from non-smokers and 4792 from smoker patients. The meta-analysis provided an odds ratio indicating a significant association between smoking and higher prevalence of root filled teeth with radiolucent periapical lesions (OR = 1.16; 95% CI = 1.07-1.26; = 0.0004). The certainty of the literature assessment was moderate per GRADE. The ROBINS-I tool classified three studies as low risk of bias, and the fourth as moderate risk of bias.

Conclusions: Moderate, quality scientific evidence indicates a weak but significant relationship between smoking and the prevalence of RPLs in RFT. Smoking can be considered a negative prognostic factor for the outcome of root canal treatment. Endodontic providers should be aware of the relationship between smoking and persistent apical periodontitis, assessed as RPLs, in RFT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm9113506DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7692336PMC
October 2020

Cigarette Smoking and Root Filled Teeth Extraction: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

J Clin Med 2020 Sep 30;9(10). Epub 2020 Sep 30.

Department of Stomatology, Section of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Sevilla, 41009 Sevilla, Spain.

Aim: The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate the possible association between smoking habits and the occurrence of root-filled teeth (RFT) extraction.

Material And Methods: The Population, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome (PICO) question was in adult patients who had RFT, does the absence or presence of smoking habits affect the prevalence of extracted RFT? Systematic MEDLINE/PubMed, Wiley Online Database, Web of Science, and PRISMA protocol was used to evaluate and present the results. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used for certainty in the evidence. The risk of bias was assessed according to Cochrane Collaboration common scheme for bias and ROBINS-I tool. Cumulative meta-analysis was performed with a random effects model. PROSPERO registration code: CRD42020165279.

Results: After search strategy, 571 articles were recovered, seven were selected for full-text analysis, and two reported data on inclusion criteria, including 516 RFT, 351 in non-smokers, and 165 in smoker subjects. The meta-analysis provided an odds ratio indicating significant association between smoking and the prevalence of extracted RFT (OR = 3.43, 95% CI = 1.17-10.05, = 0.02, I² = 64%). The certainty of the literature assessment was low per GRADE. Both studies were considered as moderate risk of bias.

Conclusions: Tobacco smoking should be considered a negative prognostic factor for the outcome of root canal treatment, although the quality of the evidence is low. RFT of smoking patients are three times more likely to be extracted. Continuing to smoke after endodontic treatment may increase the risk of treatment failure. However, the overall strength of evidence is low. This must be considered a limitation of the present study and the conclusion should be valued with caution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm9103179DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7601225PMC
September 2020