Publications by authors named "Victoria A White"

2 Publications

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The test accuracy of antenatal ultrasound definitions of fetal macrosomia to predict birth injury: A systematic review.

Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 2020 Mar 16;246:79-85. Epub 2020 Jan 16.

Division of Child Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, United Kingdom.

Objectives: To determine which ultrasound measurement for predicted fetal macrosomia most accurately predicts adverse delivery and neonatal outcomes.

Study Design: Four biomedical databases searched for studies published after 1966. Randomised trials or observational studies of women with singleton pregnancies, resulting in a term birth who have undergone an index test of interest measured and recorded as predicted fetal macrosomia ≥28 weeks. Adverse outcomes of interest included shoulder dystocia, brachial plexus injury (BPI) and Caesarean section.

Results: Twenty-five observational studies (13,285 participants) were included. For BPI, the only significant positive association was found for Abdominal Circumference (AC) to Head Circumference (HC) difference > 50 mm (OR 7.2, 95 % CI 1.8-29). Shoulder dystocia was significantly associated with abdominal diameter (AD) minus biparietal diameter (BPD) ≥ 2.6 cm (OR 4.2, 95 % CI 2.3-7.5, PPV 11 %) and AC > 90th centile (OR 2.3, 95 % CI 1.3-4.0, PPV 8.6 %) and an estimated fetal weight (EFW) > 4000 g (OR 2.1 95 %CI 1.0-4.1, PPV 7.2 %).

Conclusions: Estimated fetal weight is the most widely used ultrasound marker to predict fetal macrosomia in the UK. This study suggests other markers have a higher positive predictive value for adverse outcomes associated with fetal macrosomia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejogrb.2020.01.019DOI Listing
March 2020

Trials of antenatal corticosteroids for preterm fetal lung maturity: a review of the potential for selective outcome reporting.

Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 2019 May 11;236:58-68. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Division of Child Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham City Hospital, NG5 1PB, United Kingdom.

Objective: To measure the extent to which the evidence underpinning prenatal corticosteroids for preterm fetal lung maturity is at risk of bias due to selective outcome reporting.

Study Design: Five biomedical databases (Medline, ClinicalTrials.gov, Embase, OVID and HMIC) were searched for trials published between February 2016 and September 2017. Randomised trials of prenatal steroids for women at risk of preterm birth were identified. For each, we recorded the registration status and timing, and whether the registered primary outcome had been reported. For unregistered trials, we estimated the potential for selective outcome reporting indirectly by tabulating all reported outcomes and by comparing the first outcome reported in the methods to the first in the results section.

Results: Twenty seven trials were identified. Only three (11%) trials had been registered. All three reported their pre-specified primary outcome. Among the unregistered trials, thirteen (54%) had different first reported outcomes in the methods and results sections, and among all trials many different outcomes were reported suggesting considerable potential for selective reporting. However, the single outcome of respiratory distress syndrome, albeit defined in different ways, was reported in all but two trials. This is reassuring evidence that the beneficial effect of steroids on this outcome has not been exaggerated by selective outcome reporting.

Conclusion: We conclude that the evidence that steroids reduce respiratory distress syndrome is secure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejogrb.2019.02.031DOI Listing
May 2019