Publications by authors named "Victoria Álvarez"

149 Publications

Long runs of homozygosity are associated with Alzheimer's disease.

Transl Psychiatry 2021 Feb 24;11(1):142. Epub 2021 Feb 24.

Research Center and Memory clinic Fundació ACE. Institut Català de Neurociències Aplicades, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain.

Long runs of homozygosity (ROH) are contiguous stretches of homozygous genotypes, which are a footprint of inbreeding and recessive inheritance. The presence of recessive loci is suggested for Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, their search has been poorly assessed to date. To investigate homozygosity in AD, here we performed a fine-scale ROH analysis using 10 independent cohorts of European ancestry (11,919 AD cases and 9181 controls.) We detected an increase of homozygosity in AD cases compared to controls [β (CI 95%) = 0.070 (0.037-0.104); P = 3.91 × 10; β (CI95%) = 0.043 (0.009-0.076); P = 0.013]. ROHs increasing the risk of AD (OR > 1) were significantly overrepresented compared to ROHs increasing protection (p < 2.20 × 10). A significant ROH association with AD risk was detected upstream the HS3ST1 locus (chr4:11,189,482‒11,305,456), (β (CI 95%) = 1.09 (0.48 ‒ 1.48), p value = 9.03 × 10), previously related to AD. Next, to search for recessive candidate variants in ROHs, we constructed a homozygosity map of inbred AD cases extracted from an outbred population and explored ROH regions in whole-exome sequencing data (N = 1449). We detected a candidate marker, rs117458494, mapped in the SPON1 locus, which has been previously associated with amyloid metabolism. Here, we provide a research framework to look for recessive variants in AD using outbred populations. Our results showed that AD cases have enriched homozygosity, suggesting that recessive effects may explain a proportion of AD heritability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41398-020-01145-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7904832PMC
February 2021

The "diagnose and leave in" strategy for diminutive rectosigmoid polyps in Lynch syndrome: a post hoc analysis from a randomized controlled trial.

Endoscopy 2020 Dec 3. Epub 2020 Dec 3.

Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, Department of Gastroenterology, Institut d'Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain.

Background:  The "diagnose-and-leave-in" policy has been established to reduce the risks and costs related to unnecessary polypectomies in the average-risk population. In individuals with Lynch syndrome, owing to accelerated carcinogenesis, the general recommendation is to remove all polyps, irrespective of size, location, and appearance. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of the diagnose-and-leave-in strategy in individuals with Lynch syndrome. METHODS : We performed a post hoc analysis based on per-polyp data from a randomized, clinical trial conducted by 24 dedicated colonoscopists at 14 academic centers, in which 256 patients with confirmed Lynch syndrome underwent surveillance colonoscopy from July 2016 to January 2018. In vivo optical diagnosis with confidence level for all detected lesions was obtained before polypectomy using virtual chromoendoscopy alone or with dye-based chromoendoscopy. Primary outcome was the negative predictive value (NPV) for neoplasia of high-confidence optical diagnosis among diminutive (≤ 5 mm) rectosigmoid lesions. Histology was the reference standard.

Results: Of 147 rectosigmoid lesions, 128 were diminutive. In 103 of the 128 lesions (81 %), the optical diagnostic confidence was high and showed an NPV of 96.0 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 88.9 %-98.6 %) and accuracy of 89.3 % (95 %CI 81.9 %-93.9 %). By following the diagnose-and-leave-in policy, we would have avoided 59 % (75/128) of polypectomies at the expense of two diminutive low grade dysplastic adenomas and one diminutive sessile serrated lesion that would have been left in situ.

Conclusion: In patients with Lynch syndrome, the diagnose-and-leave-in strategy for diminutive rectosigmoid polyps would be feasible and safe.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1328-5405DOI Listing
December 2020

The Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 3 gene (IFITM3) rs12252 C variant is associated with COVID-19.

Cytokine 2021 01 23;137:155354. Epub 2020 Oct 23.

Genética Molecular, Hospital Universitario Central Asturias, Oviedo, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Principado deAsturias, ISPA, Oviedo, Spain; Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain; Red de Investigación Renal (REDINREN), Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

Background And Aims: The interferon-induced transmembrane proteins play an important antiviral role by preventing viruses from traversing the cellular lipid bilayer. IFITM3 gene variants have been associated with the clinical response to influenza and other viruses. Our aim was to determine whether the IFITM3 rs12252 polymorphism was associated with the risk of developing severe symptoms of COVID-19 in our population.

Methods: A total of 288 COVID-19 patients who required hospitalization (81 in the intensive care unit) and 440 age matched controls were genotyped with a Taqman assay. Linear regression models were used to compare allele and genotype frequencies between the groups, correcting for age and sex.

Results: Carriers of the minor allele frequency (rs12252 C) were significantly more frequent in the patients compared to controls after correcting by age and sex (p = 0.01, OR = 2.02, 95%CI = 1.19-3.42). This genotype was non-significantly more common among patients who required ICU.

Conclusions: The IFITM3 rs12252 C allele was a risk factor for COVID-19 hospitalization in our Caucasian population. The extent of the association was lower than the reported among Chinese, a population with a much higher frequency of the risk allele.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cyto.2020.155354DOI Listing
January 2021

Genetic variation in APOE, GRN, and TP53 are phenotype modifiers in frontotemporal dementia.

Neurobiol Aging 2021 Mar 2;99:99.e15-99.e22. Epub 2020 Sep 2.

Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Principado de Asturias - ISPA, Oviedo, Spain; Servicio de Neurología, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain.

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinical, genetic, and pathologic heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we investigated the role of APOƐ4, rs5848 in GRN, and rs1042522 in TP53 gene as disease risk factors and/or phenotype modifiers in 440 FTD patients, including 175 C9orf72 expansion carriers. We found that the C9orf72 expansion carriers showing an earlier age at onset (p < 0.001). Among the clinical groups, the FTD-MND (motoneuron disease) showed the lowest survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 4.12), and the progressive nonfluent aphasia group showed the highest onset age (p = 0.03). In our cohort, the rs1042522 in TP53 was associated with disease onset (p = 0.02) and survival (HR = 1.73) and rs5848 GRN with a significantly shorter survival in CC homozygous patients (HR = 1.98). The frequency of APOƐ4 carriers was significantly increased in the C9orf72 noncarriers (p = 0.022). Although validation of our findings is necessary, our results suggest that TP53, GRN, and APOE genes may act as phenotype modifiers in FTD and should be considered in future clinical trials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2020.08.018DOI Listing
March 2021

, age at onset, and ancestry help discriminate behavioral from language variants in FTLD cohorts.

Authors:
Beatrice Costa Claudia Manzoni Manuel Bernal-Quiros Demis A Kia Miquel Aguilar Ignacio Alvarez Victoria Alvarez Ole Andreassen Maria Anfossi Silvia Bagnoli Luisa Benussi Livia Bernardi Giuliano Binetti Daniel Blackburn Mercè Boada Barbara Borroni Lucy Bowns Geir Bråthen Amalia C Bruni Huei-Hsin Chiang Jordi Clarimon Shuna Colville Maria E Conidi Tom E Cope Carlos Cruchaga Chiara Cupidi Maria Elena Di Battista Janine Diehl-Schmid Monica Diez-Fairen Oriol Dols-Icardo Elisabetta Durante Dušan Flisar Francesca Frangipane Daniela Galimberti Maura Gallo Maurizio Gallucci Roberta Ghidoni Caroline Graff Jordan H Grafman Murray Grossman John Hardy Isabel Hernández Guy J T Holloway Edward D Huey Ignacio Illán-Gala Anna Karydas Behzad Khoshnood Milica G Kramberger Mark Kristiansen Patrick A Lewis Alberto Lleó Gaganjit K Madhan Raffaele Maletta Aleš Maver Manuel Menendez-Gonzalez Graziella Milan Bruce Miller Merel O Mol Parastoo Momeni Sonia Moreno-Grau Chris M Morris Benedetta Nacmias Christer Nilsson Valeria Novelli Linn Öijerstedt Alessandro Padovani Suvankar Pal Yasmin Panchbhaya Pau Pastor Borut Peterlin Irene Piaceri Stuart Pickering-Brown Yolande A L Pijnenburg Annibale A Puca Innocenzo Rainero Antonella Rendina Anna M T Richardson Ekaterina Rogaeva Boris Rogelj Sara Rollinson Giacomina Rossi Carola Rossmeier James B Rowe Elisa Rubino Agustín Ruiz Raquel Sanchez-Valle Sigrid B Sando Alexander F Santillo Jennifer Saxon Elio Scarpini Maria Serpente Nicoletta Smirne Sandro Sorbi EunRan Suh Fabrizio Tagliavini Jennifer C Thompson John Q Trojanowski Vivianna M Van Deerlin Julie Van der Zee Christine Van Broeckhoven Jeroen van Rooij John C Van Swieten Arianna Veronesi Emilia Vitale Maria L Waldö Cathy Woodward Jennifer Yokoyama Valentina Escott-Price James M Polke Raffaele Ferrari

Neurology 2020 12 17;95(24):e3288-e3302. Epub 2020 Sep 17.

From the Institute of Neurology (B.C., D.A.K., J.H., P.A.L., R.F.), School of Pharmacy (C.M.), and UCL Movement Disorders Centre (J.H.), University College London; School of Pharmacy (C.M., P.A.L.), University of Reading, Whiteknights; Neurogenetics Laboratory (M.B.-Q., C.W., J.M.P.), National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK; Aptima Clinic (Miquel Aguilar), Terrassa; Memory Disorders Unit, Department of Neurology (I.A., M.D.-F., P.P.), University Hospital Mutua de Terrassa, Barcelona; Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias (V.A., M.M.-G.), Oviedo, Spain; NORMENT (O.A.), Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Regional Neurogenetic Centre (Maria Anfossi, Livia Bernardi, A.C.B., M.E.C., Chiara Cupidi, F.F., Maura Gallo, R.M., N.S.), ASPCZ, Lamezia Terme; Department of Neuroscience, Psychology, Drug Research and Child Health (S.B., B.N., I.P., S.S.), University of Florence; Molecular Markers Laboratory (Luisa Benussi, Giuliano Binetti, R.G.), IRCCS Istituto Centro San Giovanni di Dio Fatebenefratelli, Brescia, Italy; Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience (SITraN), Department of Neuroscience (D.B.), University of Sheffield, UK; Research Center and Memory Clinic (M.B., I.H., S.M.-G., Agustín Ruiz), Fundació ACE, Institut Català de Neurociències Aplicades, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC), Barcelona, Spain; Centre for Neurodegenerative Disorders (B.B., A.P.), Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Italy; Department of Clinical Neurosciences (Lucy Bowns, T.E.C., J.B.R.), Cambridge University, UK; Department of Neurology (Geir Bråthen, S.B.S.), University Hospital of Trondheim, Norway; Dept NVS, Division of Neurogeriatrics (H.-H.C., C.G., B.K., L.Ö.), Karolinska Institutet, Bioclinicum Solna, Sweden; Department of Neurology (J.C., O.D.-I., I.I.-G., A.L.), IIB Sant Pau, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain; Anne Rowling Regenerative Neurology Clinic (S.C., G.J.T.H., S.P.) and Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences (S.P.), University of Edinburgh, UK; NeuroGenomics and Informatics, Department of Psychiatry (Carlos Cruchaga), Washington University, St. Louis, MO; Cognitive Impairment Center (M.E.D.B., Maurizio Gallucci) and Immunohematology and Transfusional Medicine Service (E.D., A.V.), Local Health Authority n.2 Marca Trevigiana, Treviso, Italy; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy (J.D.-S., C.R.), School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Germany; Department of Neurology (D.F., M.G.K.) and Clinical Institute of Medical Genetics (A.M., B.P.), University Medical Center Ljubljana, Slovenia; Dino Ferrari Center (D.G., Elio Scarpini, M.S.), University of Milan, Italy; Cognitive Neuroscience Lab, Think and Speak Lab (J.H.G.), Shirley Ryan Ability Lab, Chicago, IL; Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (Murray Grossman, EunRan Suh, J.Q.T., V.M.V.D.), Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; UCL Dementia Research Institute (J.H.), London; Reta Lila Weston Institute (J.H.), UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, UK; Institute for Advanced Study (J.H.), The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, China; Royal Edinburgh Hospital (G.J.T.H.), UK; Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain (E.D.H.), Columbia University, New York, NY; Department of Neurology, Memory and Aging Center (A.K., B.M., J.Y.), University of California, San Francisco; UCL Genomics (M.K., G.K.M., Y.P.), UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, UK; Geriatric Center Frullone ASL Napoli 1 Centro (G.M.), Napoli, Italy; Department of Neurology (M.O.M., J.v.R., J.C.V.S.), Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Rona Holdings (P.M.), Silicon Valley, CA; Newcastle Brain Tissue Resource, Institute of Neuroscience (C.M.M.), Newcastle University, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK; Department of Neurology (C.N.), Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS (V.N.), Rome, Italy; Division of Neuroscience & Experimental Psychology (S.P.-B., A.M.T.R., S.R., J.C.T.), University of Manchester, UK; Amsterdam University Medical Center (Y.A.L.P.), VU University Medical Center, the Netherlands; Cardiovascular Research Unit (A.A.P.), IRCCS Multimedica, Milan; Neurology I, Department of Neuroscience (I.R., Elisa Rubino), University of Torino; NeurOMICS laboratory (G.M., Antonella Rendina, E.V.), Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology (IBBC), CNR Napoli, Italy; Manchester Centre for Clinical Neurosciences (A.M.T.R., J.S., J.C.T.), Salford Royal NHS Trust, Manchester, UK; Tanz Centre for Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases (Ekaterina Rogaeva), University of Toronto, Canada; Department of Biotechnology (B.R.), Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia; Division of Neurology V and Neuropathology (G.R., F.T.), Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan, Italy; Alzheimer's Disease and Other Cognitive Disorders Unit (R.S.-V.), Hospital Clínic of Barcelona, Spain; Clinical Memory Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö (C.N., A.F.S.), and Division of Clinical Sciences Helsingborg, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund (M.L.W.), Lund University, Sweden; Neurodegenerative Brain Diseases Group (J.V.d.Z., C.V.B.), Center for Molecular Neurology, VIB, Antwerp, Belgium; Medical Research Council Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics (V.E.-P.), Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences and Dementia Research Institute, Cardiff University, UK; Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Principado de Asturias (V.A.), Oviedo, Asturias; Fundació per la Recerca Biomèdica i Social Mútua Terrassa (I.A., M.D.-F., P.P.), Barcelona; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED) (M.B., J.C., O.D.-I., I.H., I.I.-G., A.L., S.M.-G., Agustín Ruiz), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit (Lucy Bowns, T.E.C., J.B.R.), Cambridge University, UK; Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science (Geir Bråthen, S.B.S.), Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Unit for Hereditary Dementias (H.-H.C., C.G., B.K., L.Ö.), Theme Aging, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden; Medical Faculty (D.F., M.G.K.), University of Ljubljana, Slovenia; Fondazione IRCCS Ca'Granda (D.G., Elio Scarpini, M.S.), Ospedale Policlinico, Milan, Italy; Penn Center for Frontotemporal Degeneration (Murray Grossman), Philadelphia, PA; Universidad de Oviedo (M.M.-G.), Asturias, Spain; IRCCS Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi (B.N., S.S.), Florence; Istituto di Medicina Genomica (V.N.), Università Cattolica del sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy; Amsterdam Neuroscience (Y.A.L.P.), the Netherlands; Department of Medicine and Surgery (A.A.P.), University of Salerno, Baronissi (SA), Italy; Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology (B.R.), University of Ljubljana, Slovenia; Institud d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (R.S.-V.), Barcelona, Spain; Department of Biomedical Sciences (J.V.d.Z., C.V.B.), University of Antwerp, Belgium; and Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences (P.A.L.), The Royal Veterinary College, London, UK.

Objective: We sought to characterize expansions in relation to genetic ancestry and age at onset (AAO) and to use these measures to discriminate the behavioral from the language variant syndrome in a large pan-European cohort of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) cases.

Methods: We evaluated expansions frequency in the entire cohort (n = 1,396; behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia [bvFTD] [n = 800], primary progressive aphasia [PPA] [n = 495], and FTLD-motor neuron disease [MND] [n = 101]). We then focused on the bvFTD and PPA cases and tested for association between expansion status, syndromes, genetic ancestry, and AAO applying statistical tests comprising Fisher exact tests, analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc tests, and logistic and nonlinear mixed-effects model regressions.

Results: We found pathogenic expansions in 4% of all cases (56/1,396). Expansion carriers differently distributed across syndromes: 12/101 FTLD-MND (11.9%), 40/800 bvFTD (5%), and 4/495 PPA (0.8%). While addressing population substructure through principal components analysis (PCA), we defined 2 patients groups with Central/Northern (n = 873) and Southern European (n = 523) ancestry. The proportion of expansion carriers was significantly higher in bvFTD compared to PPA (5% vs 0.8% [ = 2.17 × 10; odds ratio (OR) 6.4; confidence interval (CI) 2.31-24.99]), as well as in individuals with Central/Northern European compared to Southern European ancestry (4.4% vs 1.8% [ = 1.1 × 10; OR 2.5; CI 1.17-5.99]). Pathogenic expansions and Central/Northern European ancestry independently and inversely correlated with AAO. Our prediction model (based on expansions status, genetic ancestry, and AAO) predicted a diagnosis of bvFTD with 64% accuracy.

Conclusions: Our results indicate correlation between pathogenic expansions, AAO, PCA-based Central/Northern European ancestry, and a diagnosis of bvFTD, implying complex genetic risk architectures differently underpinning the behavioral and language variant syndromes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000010914DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7836664PMC
December 2020

Angiotensin-converting enzymes (ACE, ACE2) gene variants and COVID-19 outcome.

Gene 2020 Dec 31;762:145102. Epub 2020 Aug 31.

Genética Molecular, Hospital Universitario Central Asturias, Oviedo, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Principado deAsturias, ISPA, Oviedo, Spain; Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain; Red de Investigación Renal (REDINREN), Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

The Angiotensin system is implicated in the pathogenesis of COVID-19. First, ACE2 is the cellular receptor for SARS-CoV-2, and expression of the ACE2 gene could regulate the individuaĺs susceptibility to infection. In addition, the balance between ACE1 and ACE2 activity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of respiratory diseases and could play a role in the severity of COVID-19. Functional ACE1/ACE2 gene polymorphisms have been associated with the risk of cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, and could thus also contribute to the outcome of COVID-19. We studied 204 COVID-19 patients (137 non-severe and 67 severe-ICU cases) and 536 age-matched controls. The ACE1 insertion/deletion and ACE2 rs2285666 polymorphism were determined. Variables frequencies were compared between the groups by logistic regression. We also sequenced the ACE2 coding nucleotides in a group of patients. Severe COVID-19 was associated with hypertension male gender (p < 0.001), hypertension (p = 0.006), hypercholesterolaemia (p = 0.046), and the ACE1-DD genotype (p = 0.049). In the multiple logistic regression hypertension (p = 0.02, OR = 2.26, 95%CI = 1.12-4.63) and male gender (p = 0.002; OR = 3.15, 95%CI = 1.56-6.66) remained as independent significant predictors of severity. The ACE2 polymorphism was not associated with the disease outcome. The ACE2 sequencing showed no coding sequence variants that could explain an increased risk of developing COVID-19. In conclusion, an adverse outcome of COVID-19 was associated with male gender, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and the ACE1 genotype. Our work suggested that the ACE1-I/D might influence COVID-19 severity, but the effect was dependent on the hypertensive status. This result requires further validation in other large cohorts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gene.2020.145102DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7456966PMC
December 2020

Capillary electrophoresis of PCR fragments with 5´-labelled primers for testing the SARS-Cov-2.

J Virol Methods 2020 10 10;284:113937. Epub 2020 Jul 10.

Genética Molecular, Hospital Universitario Central Asturias, Oviedo, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Principado de Asturias, ISPA, Oviedo, Spain; Departamento Medicina, Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain; Red de Investigación Renal (REDINREN), Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

Due to the huge demand for SARS-Cov-2 determination,alternatives to the standard qtPCRtestsare potentially useful for increasing the number of samples screened. Our aim was to develop a direct fluorescent PCR capillary-electrophoresis detection of the viral genome. We validated this approach on several SARS-Cov-2 positive and negative samples.We isolated the naso-pharingealRNA from 20 positive and 10 negative samples. The cDNA was synthesised and two fragments of the SARS-Cov-2 were amplified. One of the primers for each pair was 5´-end fluorochrome labelled. The amplifications were subjected to capillary electrophoresis in ABI3130 sequencers to visualize the fluorescent peaks.The two SARS-Cov-2 fragments were successfully amplified in the positive samples, while the negative samples did not render fluorescent peaks. In conclusion, we describe and alternative method to identify the SARS-Cov-2 genome that could be scaled to the analysis of approximately 100 samples in less than 5 h. By combining a standard PCR with capillary electrophoresis our approach would overcome the limits imposed to many labs by the qtPCR and increase the testing capacity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jviromet.2020.113937DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7351060PMC
October 2020

Role for ATXN1, ATXN2, and HTT intermediate repeats in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

Neurobiol Aging 2020 03 1;87:139.e1-139.e7. Epub 2019 Nov 1.

Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Principado de Asturias -ISPA, Oviedo, Spain; Servicio de Neurología, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain.

We analyzed the frequency of intermediate alleles (IAs) in the ATXN1, ATXN2, and HTT genes in several neurodegenerative diseases. The study included 1126 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 440 patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and 610 patients with Parkinson's disease. In all cohorts, we genotyped ATXN1 and ATXN2 CAG repeats. In addition, in the FTD cohort, we determined the number of HTT CAG repeats. The frequency of HTT IAs was higher in patients with FTD (6.9%) versus controls (2.9%) and in the C9orf72 expansion noncarriers (7.2%) versus controls (2.9%), although the difference was nonsignificant after correction for multiple testing. Compared with controls, progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) groups showed a significantly higher frequency of HTT IAs (13.6% vs. 2.9% controls). For the ATXN2 gene, we observed an increase in IA frequency in AD cases (AD 4.1% vs. controls 1.8%) and in the behavioral FTD group (4.8% vs. 1.8%). For the ATXN1 gene, we found a significant increase of IAs in patients with PNFA (18.6%) versus controls (6.7%). In conclusion, our work suggests that the HTT and ATXN1 IAS may contribute to PNFA pathogenesis and point to a link between ATXN2 IAS and AD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2019.10.017DOI Listing
March 2020

The Genetic Architecture of Parkinson Disease in Spain: Characterizing Population-Specific Risk, Differential Haplotype Structures, and Providing Etiologic Insight.

Authors:
Sara Bandres-Ciga Sarah Ahmed Marya S Sabir Cornelis Blauwendraat Astrid D Adarmes-Gómez Inmaculada Bernal-Bernal Marta Bonilla-Toribio Dolores Buiza-Rueda Fátima Carrillo Mario Carrión-Claro Pilar Gómez-Garre Silvia Jesús Miguel A Labrador-Espinosa Daniel Macias Carlota Méndez-Del-Barrio Teresa Periñán-Tocino Cristina Tejera-Parrado Laura Vargas-González Monica Diez-Fairen Ignacio Alvarez Juan Pablo Tartari Mariateresa Buongiorno Miquel Aguilar Ana Gorostidi Jesús Alberto Bergareche Elisabet Mondragon Ana Vinagre-Aragon Ioana Croitoru Javier Ruiz-Martínez Oriol Dols-Icardo Jaime Kulisevsky Juan Marín-Lahoz Javier Pagonabarraga Berta Pascual-Sedano Mario Ezquerra Ana Cámara Yaroslau Compta Manel Fernández Rubén Fernández-Santiago Esteban Muñoz Eduard Tolosa Francesc Valldeoriola Isabel Gonzalez-Aramburu Antonio Sanchez Rodriguez María Sierra Manuel Menéndez-González Marta Blazquez Ciara Garcia Esther Suarez-San Martin Pedro García-Ruiz Juan Carlos Martínez-Castrillo Lydia Vela-Desojo Clara Ruz Francisco Javier Barrero Francisco Escamilla-Sevilla Adolfo Mínguez-Castellanos Debora Cerdan Cesar Tabernero Maria Jose Gomez Heredia Francisco Perez Errazquin Manolo Romero-Acebal Cici Feliz Jose Luis Lopez-Sendon Marina Mata Irene Martínez Torres Jonggeol Jeffrey Kim Clifton L Dalgard Janet Brooks Sara Saez-Atienzar J Raphael Gibbs Rafael Jorda Juan A Botia Luis Bonet-Ponce Karen E Morrison Carl Clarke Manuela Tan Huw Morris Connor Edsall Dena Hernandez Javier Simon-Sanchez Mike A Nalls Sonja W Scholz Adriano Jimenez-Escrig Jacinto Duarte Francisco Vives Raquel Duran Janet Hoenicka Victoria Alvarez Jon Infante Maria José Marti Jordi Clarimón Adolfo López de Munain Pau Pastor Pablo Mir Andrew Singleton

Mov Disord 2019 12 29;34(12):1851-1863. Epub 2019 Oct 29.

Laboratory of Neurogenetics, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Background: The Iberian Peninsula stands out as having variable levels of population admixture and isolation, making Spain an interesting setting for studying the genetic architecture of neurodegenerative diseases.

Objectives: To perform the largest PD genome-wide association study restricted to a single country.

Methods: We performed a GWAS for both risk of PD and age at onset in 7,849 Spanish individuals. Further analyses included population-specific risk haplotype assessments, polygenic risk scoring through machine learning, Mendelian randomization of expression, and methylation data to gain insight into disease-associated loci, heritability estimates, genetic correlations, and burden analyses.

Results: We identified a novel population-specific genome-wide association study signal at PARK2 associated with age at onset, which was likely dependent on the c.155delA mutation. We replicated four genome-wide independent signals associated with PD risk, including SNCA, LRRK2, KANSL1/MAPT, and HLA-DQB1. A significant trend for smaller risk haplotypes at known loci was found compared to similar studies of non-Spanish origin. Seventeen PD-related genes showed functional consequence by two-sample Mendelian randomization in expression and methylation data sets. Long runs of homozygosity at 28 known genes/loci were found to be enriched in cases versus controls.

Conclusions: Our data demonstrate the utility of the Spanish risk haplotype substructure for future fine-mapping efforts, showing how leveraging unique and diverse population histories can benefit genetic studies of complex diseases. The present study points to PARK2 as a major hallmark of PD etiology in Spain. © 2019 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.27864DOI Listing
December 2019

The N125S polymorphism in the cathepsin G gene (rs45567233) is associated with susceptibility to osteomyelitis in a Spanish population.

PLoS One 2019 24;14(10):e0220022. Epub 2019 Oct 24.

Group of Translational Research in Infectious Diseases, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Principado de Asturias (ISPA), Oviedo, Spain.

Background: Osteomyelitis is a bone infection, most often caused by Staphylococcus aureus, in which neutrophils play a key role. Cathepsin G (CTSG) is a bactericidal serine protease stored in the neutrophil azurophilic granules. CTSG regulates inflammation, activating matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and coagulation. Lactoferrin (LF), a neutrophil glycoprotein, increases CTSG catalytic activity and induces inflammation. The aim of this study was to analyze a potential association between a CTSG gene polymorphism (Asn125Ser or N125S, rs45567233), that modifies CTSG activity, and could affect susceptibility to, or outcome of, bacterial osteomyelitis.

Methods: CTSG N125S polymorphism was genotyped in 329 osteomyelitis patients and 415 controls), Blood coagulation parameters, serum CTSG activity, LF, MMP-1, MMP-13, and soluble receptor activator for nuclear factor κ B ligand (sRANKL) levels were assessed in carriers of the different CTSG genotypes.

Results: CTSG N125S (AG) genotype was significantly more frequent among osteomyelitis patients than controls (15.5% vs. 9.4%, p = 0.014). CTSG N125S variant G allele (AG +GG) was also more frequent among osteomyelitis patients (8.1% vs. 4.7%, p = 0.01). Serum CTSG activity and LF levels were significantly higher in osteomyelitis patients carrying the G allele compared to those with the AA genotype, (p<0.04). Serum MMP-1 was lower in the G allele carriers (p = 0.01). There was no association between these genotypes and clinical characteristics of osteomyelitis, or coagulation parameters, MMP-13, and sRANKL serum levels.

Conclusions: Differences in the CTSG gene might enhance osteomyelitis susceptibility by increasing CTSG activity and LF levels.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0220022PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6812796PMC
March 2020

White-Light Endoscopy Is Adequate for Lynch Syndrome Surveillance in a Randomized and Noninferiority Study.

Gastroenterology 2020 03 12;158(4):895-904.e1. Epub 2019 Sep 12.

Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, Department of Gastroenterology, Barcelona, Spain; Institut d'Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBERehd), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address:

Background & Aims: Dye-based pancolonic chromoendoscopy is recommended for colorectal cancer surveillance in patients with Lynch syndrome. However, there is scarce evidence to support its superiority to high-definition white-light endoscopy. We performed a prospective study assess whether in the hands of high detecting colonoscopists, high-definition, white-light endoscopy is noninferior to pancolonic chromoendoscopy for detection of adenomas in patients with Lynch syndrome.

Methods: We conducted a parallel controlled study, from July 2016 through January 2018 at 14 centers in Spain of adults with pathogenic germline variants in mismatch repair genes (60% women; mean age, 47 ± 14 years) under surveillance. Patients were randomly assigned to groups that underwent high-definition white-light endoscopy (n = 128) or pancolonic chromoendoscopy (n = 128) evaluations by 24 colonoscopists who specialized in detection of colorectal lesions in high-risk patients for colorectal cancer. Adenoma detection rates (defined as the proportion of patients with at least 1 adenoma) were compared between groups, with a noninferiority margin (relative difference) of 15%.

Results: We found an important overlap of confidence intervals (CIs) and no significant difference in adenoma detection rates by pancolonic chromoendoscopy (34.4%; 95% CI 26.4%-43.3%) vs white-light endoscopy (28.1%; 95% CI 21.1%-36.4%; P = .28). However, pancolonic chromoendoscopy detected serrated lesions in a significantly higher proportion of patients (37.5%; 95% CI 29.5-46.1) than white-light endoscopy (23.4%; 95% CI 16.9-31.4; P = .01). However, there were no significant differences between groups in proportions of patients found to have serrated lesions of 5 mm or larger (9.4% vs 7.0%; P = .49), of proximal location (11.7% vs 10.2%; P = .68), or sessile serrated lesions (3.9% vs 5.5%; P = .55), respectively. Total procedure and withdrawal times with pancolonic chromoendoscopy (30.7 ± 12.8 minutes and 18.3 ± 7.6 minutes, respectively) were significantly longer than with white-light endoscopy (22.4 ± 8.7 minutes and 13.5 ± 5.6 minutes; P < .001).

Conclusions: In a randomized parallel trial, we found that for Lynch syndrome surveillance, high-definition white-light endoscopy is not inferior to pancolonic chromoendoscopy if performed by experienced and dedicated endoscopists. ClinicalTrials.gov no: NCT02951390.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2019.09.003DOI Listing
March 2020

Genome-wide association analysis of dementia and its clinical endophenotypes reveal novel loci associated with Alzheimer's disease and three causality networks: The GR@ACE project.

Alzheimers Dement 2019 10 28;15(10):1333-1347. Epub 2019 Aug 28.

Research Center and Memory clinic Fundació ACE, Institut Català de Neurociències Aplicades, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain; CIBERNED, Network Center for Biomedical Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases, National Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

Introduction: Large variability among Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases might impact genetic discoveries and complicate dissection of underlying biological pathways.

Methods: Genome Research at Fundacio ACE (GR@ACE) is a genome-wide study of dementia and its clinical endophenotypes, defined based on AD's clinical certainty and vascular burden. We assessed the impact of known AD loci across endophenotypes to generate loci categories. We incorporated gene coexpression data and conducted pathway analysis per category. Finally, to evaluate the effect of heterogeneity in genetic studies, GR@ACE series were meta-analyzed with additional genome-wide association study data sets.

Results: We classified known AD loci into three categories, which might reflect the disease clinical heterogeneity. Vascular processes were only detected as a causal mechanism in probable AD. The meta-analysis strategy revealed the ANKRD31-rs4704171 and NDUFAF6-rs10098778 and confirmed SCIMP-rs7225151 and CD33-rs3865444.

Discussion: The regulation of vasculature is a prominent causal component of probable AD. GR@ACE meta-analysis revealed novel AD genetic signals, strongly driven by the presence of clinical heterogeneity in the AD series.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2019.06.4950DOI Listing
October 2019

Parkinsonism and spastic paraplegia type 7: Expanding the spectrum of mitochondrial Parkinsonism.

Mov Disord 2019 10 21;34(10):1547-1561. Epub 2019 Aug 21.

Department of Neurology, Hospital Universitario Donostia, San Sebastian, Spain.

Background: Pathogenic variants in the spastic paraplegia type 7 gene cause a complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia phenotype associated with classical features of mitochondrial diseases, including ataxia, progressive external ophthalmoplegia, and deletions of mitochondrial DNA.

Objectives: To better characterize spastic paraplegia type 7 disease with a clinical, genetic, and functional analysis of a Spanish cohort of spastic paraplegia type 7 patients.

Methods: Genetic analysis was performed in patients suspecting hereditary spastic paraplegia and in 1 patient with parkinsonism and Pisa syndrome, through next-generation sequencing, whole-exome sequencing, targeted Sanger sequencing, and multiplex ligation-dependent probe analysis, and blood mitochondrial DNA levels determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

Results: Thirty-five patients were found to carry homozygous or compound heterozygous pathogenic variants in the spastic paraplegia type 7 gene. Mean age at onset was 40 years (range, 12-63); 63% of spastic paraplegia type 7 patients were male, and three-quarters of all patients had at least one allele with the c.1529C>T (p.Ala510Val) mutation. Eighty percent of the cohort showed a complicated phenotype, combining ataxia and progressive external ophthalmoplegia (65% and 26%, respectively). Parkinsonism was observed in 21% of cases. Analysis of blood mitochondrial DNA indicated that both patients and carriers of spastic paraplegia type 7 pathogenic variants had markedly lower levels of mitochondrial DNA than control subjects (228 per haploid nuclear DNA vs. 176 vs. 573, respectively; P < 0.001).

Conclusions: Parkinsonism is a frequent finding in spastic paraplegia type 7 patients. Spastic paraplegia type 7 pathogenic variants impair mitochondrial DNA homeostasis irrespective of the number of mutant alleles, type of variant, and patient or carrier status. Thus, spastic paraplegia type 7 supports mitochondrial DNA maintenance, and variants in the gene may cause parkinsonism owing to mitochondrial DNA abnormalities. Moreover, mitochondrial DNA blood analysis could be a useful biomarker to detect at risk families. © 2019 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.27812DOI Listing
October 2019

Author Correction: Genetic meta-analysis of diagnosed Alzheimer's disease identifies new risk loci and implicates Aβ, tau, immunity and lipid processing.

Authors:
Brian W Kunkle Benjamin Grenier-Boley Rebecca Sims Joshua C Bis Vincent Damotte Adam C Naj Anne Boland Maria Vronskaya Sven J van der Lee Alexandre Amlie-Wolf Céline Bellenguez Aura Frizatti Vincent Chouraki Eden R Martin Kristel Sleegers Nandini Badarinarayan Johanna Jakobsdottir Kara L Hamilton-Nelson Sonia Moreno-Grau Robert Olaso Rachel Raybould Yuning Chen Amanda B Kuzma Mikko Hiltunen Taniesha Morgan Shahzad Ahmad Badri N Vardarajan Jacques Epelbaum Per Hoffmann Merce Boada Gary W Beecham Jean-Guillaume Garnier Denise Harold Annette L Fitzpatrick Otto Valladares Marie-Laure Moutet Amy Gerrish Albert V Smith Liming Qu Delphine Bacq Nicola Denning Xueqiu Jian Yi Zhao Maria Del Zompo Nick C Fox Seung-Hoan Choi Ignacio Mateo Joseph T Hughes Hieab H Adams John Malamon Florentino Sanchez-Garcia Yogen Patel Jennifer A Brody Beth A Dombroski Maria Candida Deniz Naranjo Makrina Daniilidou Gudny Eiriksdottir Shubhabrata Mukherjee David Wallon James Uphill Thor Aspelund Laura B Cantwell Fabienne Garzia Daniela Galimberti Edith Hofer Mariusz Butkiewicz Bertrand Fin Elio Scarpini Chloe Sarnowski Will S Bush Stéphane Meslage Johannes Kornhuber Charles C White Yuenjoo Song Robert C Barber Sebastiaan Engelborghs Sabrina Sordon Dina Voijnovic Perrie M Adams Rik Vandenberghe Manuel Mayhaus L Adrienne Cupples Marilyn S Albert Peter P De Deyn Wei Gu Jayanadra J Himali Duane Beekly Alessio Squassina Annette M Hartmann Adelina Orellana Deborah Blacker Eloy Rodriguez-Rodriguez Simon Lovestone Melissa E Garcia Rachelle S Doody Carmen Munoz-Fernadez Rebecca Sussams Honghuang Lin Thomas J Fairchild Yolanda A Benito Clive Holmes Hata Karamujić-Čomić Matthew P Frosch Hakan Thonberg Wolfgang Maier Gennady Roshchupkin Bernardino Ghetti Vilmantas Giedraitis Amit Kawalia Shuo Li Ryan M Huebinger Lena Kilander Susanne Moebus Isabel Hernández M Ilyas Kamboh RoseMarie Brundin James Turton Qiong Yang Mindy J Katz Letizia Concari Jenny Lord Alexa S Beiser C Dirk Keene Seppo Helisalmi Iwona Kloszewska Walter A Kukull Anne Maria Koivisto Aoibhinn Lynch Lluís Tarraga Eric B Larson Annakaisa Haapasalo Brian Lawlor Thomas H Mosley Richard B Lipton Vincenzo Solfrizzi Michael Gill W T Longstreth Thomas J Montine Vincenza Frisardi Monica Diez-Fairen Fernando Rivadeneira Ronald C Petersen Vincent Deramecourt Ignacio Alvarez Francesca Salani Antonio Ciaramella Eric Boerwinkle Eric M Reiman Nathalie Fievet Jerome I Rotter Joan S Reisch Olivier Hanon Chiara Cupidi A G Andre Uitterlinden Donald R Royall Carole Dufouil Raffaele Giovanni Maletta Itziar de Rojas Mary Sano Alexis Brice Roberta Cecchetti Peter St George-Hyslop Karen Ritchie Magda Tsolaki Debby W Tsuang Bruno Dubois David Craig Chuang-Kuo Wu Hilkka Soininen Despoina Avramidou Roger L Albin Laura Fratiglioni Antonia Germanou Liana G Apostolova Lina Keller Maria Koutroumani Steven E Arnold Francesco Panza Olymbia Gkatzima Sanjay Asthana Didier Hannequin Patrice Whitehead Craig S Atwood Paolo Caffarra Harald Hampel Inés Quintela Ángel Carracedo Lars Lannfelt David C Rubinsztein Lisa L Barnes Florence Pasquier Lutz Frölich Sandra Barral Bernadette McGuinness Thomas G Beach Janet A Johnston James T Becker Peter Passmore Eileen H Bigio Jonathan M Schott Thomas D Bird Jason D Warren Bradley F Boeve Michelle K Lupton James D Bowen Petra Proitsi Adam Boxer John F Powell James R Burke John S K Kauwe Jeffrey M Burns Michelangelo Mancuso Joseph D Buxbaum Ubaldo Bonuccelli Nigel J Cairns Andrew McQuillin Chuanhai Cao Gill Livingston Chris S Carlson Nicholas J Bass Cynthia M Carlsson John Hardy Regina M Carney Jose Bras Minerva M Carrasquillo Rita Guerreiro Mariet Allen Helena C Chui Elizabeth Fisher Carlo Masullo Elizabeth A Crocco Charles DeCarli Gina Bisceglio Malcolm Dick Li Ma Ranjan Duara Neill R Graff-Radford Denis A Evans Angela Hodges Kelley M Faber Martin Scherer Kenneth B Fallon Matthias Riemenschneider David W Fardo Reinhard Heun Martin R Farlow Heike Kölsch Steven Ferris Markus Leber Tatiana M Foroud Isabella Heuser Douglas R Galasko Ina Giegling Marla Gearing Michael Hüll Daniel H Geschwind John R Gilbert John Morris Robert C Green Kevin Mayo John H Growdon Thomas Feulner Ronald L Hamilton Lindy E Harrell Dmitriy Drichel Lawrence S Honig Thomas D Cushion Matthew J Huentelman Paul Hollingworth Christine M Hulette Bradley T Hyman Rachel Marshall Gail P Jarvik Alun Meggy Erin Abner Georgina E Menzies Lee-Way Jin Ganna Leonenko Luis M Real Gyungah R Jun Clinton T Baldwin Detelina Grozeva Anna Karydas Giancarlo Russo Jeffrey A Kaye Ronald Kim Frank Jessen Neil W Kowall Bruno Vellas Joel H Kramer Emma Vardy Frank M LaFerla Karl-Heinz Jöckel James J Lah Martin Dichgans James B Leverenz David Mann Allan I Levey Stuart Pickering-Brown Andrew P Lieberman Norman Klopp Kathryn L Lunetta H-Erich Wichmann Constantine G Lyketsos Kevin Morgan Daniel C Marson Kristelle Brown Frank Martiniuk Christopher Medway Deborah C Mash Markus M Nöthen Eliezer Masliah Nigel M Hooper Wayne C McCormick Antonio Daniele Susan M McCurry Anthony Bayer Andrew N McDavid John Gallacher Ann C McKee Hendrik van den Bussche Marsel Mesulam Carol Brayne Bruce L Miller Steffi Riedel-Heller Carol A Miller Joshua W Miller Ammar Al-Chalabi John C Morris Christopher E Shaw Amanda J Myers Jens Wiltfang Sid O'Bryant John M Olichney Victoria Alvarez Joseph E Parisi Andrew B Singleton Henry L Paulson John Collinge William R Perry Simon Mead Elaine Peskind David H Cribbs Martin Rossor Aimee Pierce Natalie S Ryan Wayne W Poon Benedetta Nacmias Huntington Potter Sandro Sorbi Joseph F Quinn Eleonora Sacchinelli Ashok Raj Gianfranco Spalletta Murray Raskind Carlo Caltagirone Paola Bossù Maria Donata Orfei Barry Reisberg Robert Clarke Christiane Reitz A David Smith John M Ringman Donald Warden Erik D Roberson Gordon Wilcock Ekaterina Rogaeva Amalia Cecilia Bruni Howard J Rosen Maura Gallo Roger N Rosenberg Yoav Ben-Shlomo Mark A Sager Patrizia Mecocci Andrew J Saykin Pau Pastor Michael L Cuccaro Jeffery M Vance Julie A Schneider Lori S Schneider Susan Slifer William W Seeley Amanda G Smith Joshua A Sonnen Salvatore Spina Robert A Stern Russell H Swerdlow Mitchell Tang Rudolph E Tanzi John Q Trojanowski Juan C Troncoso Vivianna M Van Deerlin Linda J Van Eldik Harry V Vinters Jean Paul Vonsattel Sandra Weintraub Kathleen A Welsh-Bohmer Kirk C Wilhelmsen Jennifer Williamson Thomas S Wingo Randall L Woltjer Clinton B Wright Chang-En Yu Lei Yu Yasaman Saba Alberto Pilotto Maria J Bullido Oliver Peters Paul K Crane David Bennett Paola Bosco Eliecer Coto Virginia Boccardi Phil L De Jager Alberto Lleo Nick Warner Oscar L Lopez Martin Ingelsson Panagiotis Deloukas Carlos Cruchaga Caroline Graff Rhian Gwilliam Myriam Fornage Alison M Goate Pascual Sanchez-Juan Patrick G Kehoe Najaf Amin Nilifur Ertekin-Taner Claudine Berr Stéphanie Debette Seth Love Lenore J Launer Steven G Younkin Jean-Francois Dartigues Chris Corcoran M Arfan Ikram Dennis W Dickson Gael Nicolas Dominique Campion JoAnn Tschanz Helena Schmidt Hakon Hakonarson Jordi Clarimon Ron Munger Reinhold Schmidt Lindsay A Farrer Christine Van Broeckhoven Michael C O'Donovan Anita L DeStefano Lesley Jones Jonathan L Haines Jean-Francois Deleuze Michael J Owen Vilmundur Gudnason Richard Mayeux Valentina Escott-Price Bruce M Psaty Alfredo Ramirez Li-San Wang Agustin Ruiz Cornelia M van Duijn Peter A Holmans Sudha Seshadri Julie Williams Phillippe Amouyel Gerard D Schellenberg Jean-Charles Lambert Margaret A Pericak-Vance

Nat Genet 2019 Sep;51(9):1423-1424

John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA.

An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-019-0495-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7265117PMC
September 2019

The Epistasis Project: A Multi-Cohort Study of the Effects of BDNF, DBH, and SORT1 Epistasis on Alzheimer's Disease Risk.

J Alzheimers Dis 2019 ;68(4):1535-1547

Oxford Project to Investigate Memory and Ageing (OPTIMA), University Department of Pharmacology, Oxford, UK.

Pre-synaptic secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) from noradrenergic neurons may protect the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain from amyloid pathology. While the BDNF polymorphism (rs6265) is associated with faster cognitive decline and increased hippocampal atrophy, a replicable genetic association of BDNF with AD risk has yet to be demonstrated. This could be due to masking by underlying epistatic interactions between BDNF and other loci that encode proteins involved in moderating BDNF secretion (DBH and Sortilin). We performed a multi-cohort case-control association study of the BDNF, DBH, and SORT1 loci comprising 5,682 controls and 2,454 AD patients from Northern Europe (87% of samples) and Spain (13%). The BDNF locus was associated with increased AD risk (odds ratios; OR = 1.1-1.2, p = 0.005-0.3), an effect size that was consistent in the Northern European (OR = 1.1-1.2, p = 0.002-0.8) but not the smaller Spanish (OR = 0.8-1.6, p = 0.4-1.0) subset. A synergistic interaction between BDNF and sex (synergy factor; SF = 1.3-1.5 p = 0.002-0.02) translated to a greater risk of AD associated with BDNF in women (OR = 1.2-1.3, p = 0.007-0.00008) than men (OR = 0.9-1.0, p = 0.3-0.6). While the DBH polymorphism (rs1611115) was also associated with increased AD risk (OR = 1.1, p = 0.04) the synergistic interaction (SF = 2.2, p = 0.007) between BDNF (rs6265) and DBH (rs1611115) contributed greater AD risk than either gene alone, an effect that was greater in women (SF = 2.4, p = 0.04) than men (SF = 2.0, p = 0.2). These data support a complex genetic interaction at loci encoding proteins implicated in the DBH-BDNF inflammatory pathway that modifies AD risk, particularly in women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JAD-181116DOI Listing
August 2020

Genetic meta-analysis of diagnosed Alzheimer's disease identifies new risk loci and implicates Aβ, tau, immunity and lipid processing.

Authors:
Brian W Kunkle Benjamin Grenier-Boley Rebecca Sims Joshua C Bis Vincent Damotte Adam C Naj Anne Boland Maria Vronskaya Sven J van der Lee Alexandre Amlie-Wolf Céline Bellenguez Aura Frizatti Vincent Chouraki Eden R Martin Kristel Sleegers Nandini Badarinarayan Johanna Jakobsdottir Kara L Hamilton-Nelson Sonia Moreno-Grau Robert Olaso Rachel Raybould Yuning Chen Amanda B Kuzma Mikko Hiltunen Taniesha Morgan Shahzad Ahmad Badri N Vardarajan Jacques Epelbaum Per Hoffmann Merce Boada Gary W Beecham Jean-Guillaume Garnier Denise Harold Annette L Fitzpatrick Otto Valladares Marie-Laure Moutet Amy Gerrish Albert V Smith Liming Qu Delphine Bacq Nicola Denning Xueqiu Jian Yi Zhao Maria Del Zompo Nick C Fox Seung-Hoan Choi Ignacio Mateo Joseph T Hughes Hieab H Adams John Malamon Florentino Sanchez-Garcia Yogen Patel Jennifer A Brody Beth A Dombroski Maria Candida Deniz Naranjo Makrina Daniilidou Gudny Eiriksdottir Shubhabrata Mukherjee David Wallon James Uphill Thor Aspelund Laura B Cantwell Fabienne Garzia Daniela Galimberti Edith Hofer Mariusz Butkiewicz Bertrand Fin Elio Scarpini Chloe Sarnowski Will S Bush Stéphane Meslage Johannes Kornhuber Charles C White Yuenjoo Song Robert C Barber Sebastiaan Engelborghs Sabrina Sordon Dina Voijnovic Perrie M Adams Rik Vandenberghe Manuel Mayhaus L Adrienne Cupples Marilyn S Albert Peter P De Deyn Wei Gu Jayanadra J Himali Duane Beekly Alessio Squassina Annette M Hartmann Adelina Orellana Deborah Blacker Eloy Rodriguez-Rodriguez Simon Lovestone Melissa E Garcia Rachelle S Doody Carmen Munoz-Fernadez Rebecca Sussams Honghuang Lin Thomas J Fairchild Yolanda A Benito Clive Holmes Hata Karamujić-Čomić Matthew P Frosch Hakan Thonberg Wolfgang Maier Gennady Roshchupkin Bernardino Ghetti Vilmantas Giedraitis Amit Kawalia Shuo Li Ryan M Huebinger Lena Kilander Susanne Moebus Isabel Hernández M Ilyas Kamboh RoseMarie Brundin James Turton Qiong Yang Mindy J Katz Letizia Concari Jenny Lord Alexa S Beiser C Dirk Keene Seppo Helisalmi Iwona Kloszewska Walter A Kukull Anne Maria Koivisto Aoibhinn Lynch Lluís Tarraga Eric B Larson Annakaisa Haapasalo Brian Lawlor Thomas H Mosley Richard B Lipton Vincenzo Solfrizzi Michael Gill W T Longstreth Thomas J Montine Vincenza Frisardi Monica Diez-Fairen Fernando Rivadeneira Ronald C Petersen Vincent Deramecourt Ignacio Alvarez Francesca Salani Antonio Ciaramella Eric Boerwinkle Eric M Reiman Nathalie Fievet Jerome I Rotter Joan S Reisch Olivier Hanon Chiara Cupidi A G Andre Uitterlinden Donald R Royall Carole Dufouil Raffaele Giovanni Maletta Itziar de Rojas Mary Sano Alexis Brice Roberta Cecchetti Peter St George-Hyslop Karen Ritchie Magda Tsolaki Debby W Tsuang Bruno Dubois David Craig Chuang-Kuo Wu Hilkka Soininen Despoina Avramidou Roger L Albin Laura Fratiglioni Antonia Germanou Liana G Apostolova Lina Keller Maria Koutroumani Steven E Arnold Francesco Panza Olymbia Gkatzima Sanjay Asthana Didier Hannequin Patrice Whitehead Craig S Atwood Paolo Caffarra Harald Hampel Inés Quintela Ángel Carracedo Lars Lannfelt David C Rubinsztein Lisa L Barnes Florence Pasquier Lutz Frölich Sandra Barral Bernadette McGuinness Thomas G Beach Janet A Johnston James T Becker Peter Passmore Eileen H Bigio Jonathan M Schott Thomas D Bird Jason D Warren Bradley F Boeve Michelle K Lupton James D Bowen Petra Proitsi Adam Boxer John F Powell James R Burke John S K Kauwe Jeffrey M Burns Michelangelo Mancuso Joseph D Buxbaum Ubaldo Bonuccelli Nigel J Cairns Andrew McQuillin Chuanhai Cao Gill Livingston Chris S Carlson Nicholas J Bass Cynthia M Carlsson John Hardy Regina M Carney Jose Bras Minerva M Carrasquillo Rita Guerreiro Mariet Allen Helena C Chui Elizabeth Fisher Carlo Masullo Elizabeth A Crocco Charles DeCarli Gina Bisceglio Malcolm Dick Li Ma Ranjan Duara Neill R Graff-Radford Denis A Evans Angela Hodges Kelley M Faber Martin Scherer Kenneth B Fallon Matthias Riemenschneider David W Fardo Reinhard Heun Martin R Farlow Heike Kölsch Steven Ferris Markus Leber Tatiana M Foroud Isabella Heuser Douglas R Galasko Ina Giegling Marla Gearing Michael Hüll Daniel H Geschwind John R Gilbert John Morris Robert C Green Kevin Mayo John H Growdon Thomas Feulner Ronald L Hamilton Lindy E Harrell Dmitriy Drichel Lawrence S Honig Thomas D Cushion Matthew J Huentelman Paul Hollingworth Christine M Hulette Bradley T Hyman Rachel Marshall Gail P Jarvik Alun Meggy Erin Abner Georgina E Menzies Lee-Way Jin Ganna Leonenko Luis M Real Gyungah R Jun Clinton T Baldwin Detelina Grozeva Anna Karydas Giancarlo Russo Jeffrey A Kaye Ronald Kim Frank Jessen Neil W Kowall Bruno Vellas Joel H Kramer Emma Vardy Frank M LaFerla Karl-Heinz Jöckel James J Lah Martin Dichgans James B Leverenz David Mann Allan I Levey Stuart Pickering-Brown Andrew P Lieberman Norman Klopp Kathryn L Lunetta H-Erich Wichmann Constantine G Lyketsos Kevin Morgan Daniel C Marson Kristelle Brown Frank Martiniuk Christopher Medway Deborah C Mash Markus M Nöthen Eliezer Masliah Nigel M Hooper Wayne C McCormick Antonio Daniele Susan M McCurry Anthony Bayer Andrew N McDavid John Gallacher Ann C McKee Hendrik van den Bussche Marsel Mesulam Carol Brayne Bruce L Miller Steffi Riedel-Heller Carol A Miller Joshua W Miller Ammar Al-Chalabi John C Morris Christopher E Shaw Amanda J Myers Jens Wiltfang Sid O'Bryant John M Olichney Victoria Alvarez Joseph E Parisi Andrew B Singleton Henry L Paulson John Collinge William R Perry Simon Mead Elaine Peskind David H Cribbs Martin Rossor Aimee Pierce Natalie S Ryan Wayne W Poon Benedetta Nacmias Huntington Potter Sandro Sorbi Joseph F Quinn Eleonora Sacchinelli Ashok Raj Gianfranco Spalletta Murray Raskind Carlo Caltagirone Paola Bossù Maria Donata Orfei Barry Reisberg Robert Clarke Christiane Reitz A David Smith John M Ringman Donald Warden Erik D Roberson Gordon Wilcock Ekaterina Rogaeva Amalia Cecilia Bruni Howard J Rosen Maura Gallo Roger N Rosenberg Yoav Ben-Shlomo Mark A Sager Patrizia Mecocci Andrew J Saykin Pau Pastor Michael L Cuccaro Jeffery M Vance Julie A Schneider Lori S Schneider Susan Slifer William W Seeley Amanda G Smith Joshua A Sonnen Salvatore Spina Robert A Stern Russell H Swerdlow Mitchell Tang Rudolph E Tanzi John Q Trojanowski Juan C Troncoso Vivianna M Van Deerlin Linda J Van Eldik Harry V Vinters Jean Paul Vonsattel Sandra Weintraub Kathleen A Welsh-Bohmer Kirk C Wilhelmsen Jennifer Williamson Thomas S Wingo Randall L Woltjer Clinton B Wright Chang-En Yu Lei Yu Yasaman Saba Alberto Pilotto Maria J Bullido Oliver Peters Paul K Crane David Bennett Paola Bosco Eliecer Coto Virginia Boccardi Phil L De Jager Alberto Lleo Nick Warner Oscar L Lopez Martin Ingelsson Panagiotis Deloukas Carlos Cruchaga Caroline Graff Rhian Gwilliam Myriam Fornage Alison M Goate Pascual Sanchez-Juan Patrick G Kehoe Najaf Amin Nilifur Ertekin-Taner Claudine Berr Stéphanie Debette Seth Love Lenore J Launer Steven G Younkin Jean-Francois Dartigues Chris Corcoran M Arfan Ikram Dennis W Dickson Gael Nicolas Dominique Campion JoAnn Tschanz Helena Schmidt Hakon Hakonarson Jordi Clarimon Ron Munger Reinhold Schmidt Lindsay A Farrer Christine Van Broeckhoven Michael C O'Donovan Anita L DeStefano Lesley Jones Jonathan L Haines Jean-Francois Deleuze Michael J Owen Vilmundur Gudnason Richard Mayeux Valentina Escott-Price Bruce M Psaty Alfredo Ramirez Li-San Wang Agustin Ruiz Cornelia M van Duijn Peter A Holmans Sudha Seshadri Julie Williams Phillippe Amouyel Gerard D Schellenberg Jean-Charles Lambert Margaret A Pericak-Vance

Nat Genet 2019 03 28;51(3):414-430. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA.

Risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), the most prevalent dementia, is partially driven by genetics. To identify LOAD risk loci, we performed a large genome-wide association meta-analysis of clinically diagnosed LOAD (94,437 individuals). We confirm 20 previous LOAD risk loci and identify five new genome-wide loci (IQCK, ACE, ADAM10, ADAMTS1, and WWOX), two of which (ADAM10, ACE) were identified in a recent genome-wide association (GWAS)-by-familial-proxy of Alzheimer's or dementia. Fine-mapping of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region confirms the neurological and immune-mediated disease haplotype HLA-DR15 as a risk factor for LOAD. Pathway analysis implicates immunity, lipid metabolism, tau binding proteins, and amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism, showing that genetic variants affecting APP and Aβ processing are associated not only with early-onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease but also with LOAD. Analyses of risk genes and pathways show enrichment for rare variants (P = 1.32 × 10), indicating that additional rare variants remain to be identified. We also identify important genetic correlations between LOAD and traits such as family history of dementia and education.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-019-0358-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6463297PMC
March 2019

HTT gene intermediate alleles in neurodegeneration: evidence for association with Alzheimer's disease.

Neurobiol Aging 2019 04 28;76:215.e9-215.e14. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Principado de Asturias (ISPA), Oviedo, Spain; Department of Neurology, Hospital Universitario de Cabueñes, Gijón, Spain.

Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of CAG repeats in the HTT gene. Intermediate alleles (IAs) are in the range of 27-35 repeats and have been associated to a normal phenotype. The aim of this work was to analyze the association between intermediate huntingtin CAG-repeat alleles (IAs) and neurodegenerative diseases, other than HD. We screened the HTT CAG repeats in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n = 1126), Parkinson's disease (PD) (n = 610), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) (n = 225). We also studied 509 healthy controls (HCs). The relative frequency of IAs for each group was 6.03% in AD, 5.3% in FTLD, 3.5% in PD, and 2.9% in HCs. The frequency of IA was significantly higher among patients with AD when compared to HCs (p = 0.011, OR = 2.11, 95% CI = 1.19-3.74); no significant difference was observed in FTLD (p = 0.17; OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 0.85-4.03) and PD (p = 0.69; OR = 1.21; 95% CI (0.61-2.37) versus HCs. No atypical symptoms or clinical features distinctive of HD were found among carriers of IAs. We found 3 cases with CAG expansions within the pathological range, one diagnosed with AD, one with PD, and one with FTD. Results suggest that IAs might have a role in the pathogenesis of AD. In addition, HD patients might be misdiagnosed with other neurodegenerative diseases, particularly when CAG repeats are in the lower pathological range.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2018.11.014DOI Listing
April 2019

Rare coding variants in PLCG2, ABI3, and TREM2 implicate microglial-mediated innate immunity in Alzheimer's disease.

Authors:
Rebecca Sims Sven J van der Lee Adam C Naj Céline Bellenguez Nandini Badarinarayan Johanna Jakobsdottir Brian W Kunkle Anne Boland Rachel Raybould Joshua C Bis Eden R Martin Benjamin Grenier-Boley Stefanie Heilmann-Heimbach Vincent Chouraki Amanda B Kuzma Kristel Sleegers Maria Vronskaya Agustin Ruiz Robert R Graham Robert Olaso Per Hoffmann Megan L Grove Badri N Vardarajan Mikko Hiltunen Markus M Nöthen Charles C White Kara L Hamilton-Nelson Jacques Epelbaum Wolfgang Maier Seung-Hoan Choi Gary W Beecham Cécile Dulary Stefan Herms Albert V Smith Cory C Funk Céline Derbois Andreas J Forstner Shahzad Ahmad Hongdong Li Delphine Bacq Denise Harold Claudia L Satizabal Otto Valladares Alessio Squassina Rhodri Thomas Jennifer A Brody Liming Qu Pascual Sánchez-Juan Taniesha Morgan Frank J Wolters Yi Zhao Florentino Sanchez Garcia Nicola Denning Myriam Fornage John Malamon Maria Candida Deniz Naranjo Elisa Majounie Thomas H Mosley Beth Dombroski David Wallon Michelle K Lupton Josée Dupuis Patrice Whitehead Laura Fratiglioni Christopher Medway Xueqiu Jian Shubhabrata Mukherjee Lina Keller Kristelle Brown Honghuang Lin Laura B Cantwell Francesco Panza Bernadette McGuinness Sonia Moreno-Grau Jeremy D Burgess Vincenzo Solfrizzi Petra Proitsi Hieab H Adams Mariet Allen Davide Seripa Pau Pastor L Adrienne Cupples Nathan D Price Didier Hannequin Ana Frank-García Daniel Levy Paramita Chakrabarty Paolo Caffarra Ina Giegling Alexa S Beiser Vilmantas Giedraitis Harald Hampel Melissa E Garcia Xue Wang Lars Lannfelt Patrizia Mecocci Gudny Eiriksdottir Paul K Crane Florence Pasquier Virginia Boccardi Isabel Henández Robert C Barber Martin Scherer Lluis Tarraga Perrie M Adams Markus Leber Yuning Chen Marilyn S Albert Steffi Riedel-Heller Valur Emilsson Duane Beekly Anne Braae Reinhold Schmidt Deborah Blacker Carlo Masullo Helena Schmidt Rachelle S Doody Gianfranco Spalletta W T Longstreth Thomas J Fairchild Paola Bossù Oscar L Lopez Matthew P Frosch Eleonora Sacchinelli Bernardino Ghetti Qiong Yang Ryan M Huebinger Frank Jessen Shuo Li M Ilyas Kamboh John Morris Oscar Sotolongo-Grau Mindy J Katz Chris Corcoran Melanie Dunstan Amy Braddel Charlene Thomas Alun Meggy Rachel Marshall Amy Gerrish Jade Chapman Miquel Aguilar Sarah Taylor Matt Hill Mònica Díez Fairén Angela Hodges Bruno Vellas Hilkka Soininen Iwona Kloszewska Makrina Daniilidou James Uphill Yogen Patel Joseph T Hughes Jenny Lord James Turton Annette M Hartmann Roberta Cecchetti Chiara Fenoglio Maria Serpente Marina Arcaro Carlo Caltagirone Maria Donata Orfei Antonio Ciaramella Sabrina Pichler Manuel Mayhaus Wei Gu Alberto Lleó Juan Fortea Rafael Blesa Imelda S Barber Keeley Brookes Chiara Cupidi Raffaele Giovanni Maletta David Carrell Sandro Sorbi Susanne Moebus Maria Urbano Alberto Pilotto Johannes Kornhuber Paolo Bosco Stephen Todd David Craig Janet Johnston Michael Gill Brian Lawlor Aoibhinn Lynch Nick C Fox John Hardy Roger L Albin Liana G Apostolova Steven E Arnold Sanjay Asthana Craig S Atwood Clinton T Baldwin Lisa L Barnes Sandra Barral Thomas G Beach James T Becker Eileen H Bigio Thomas D Bird Bradley F Boeve James D Bowen Adam Boxer James R Burke Jeffrey M Burns Joseph D Buxbaum Nigel J Cairns Chuanhai Cao Chris S Carlson Cynthia M Carlsson Regina M Carney Minerva M Carrasquillo Steven L Carroll Carolina Ceballos Diaz Helena C Chui David G Clark David H Cribbs Elizabeth A Crocco Charles DeCarli Malcolm Dick Ranjan Duara Denis A Evans Kelley M Faber Kenneth B Fallon David W Fardo Martin R Farlow Steven Ferris Tatiana M Foroud Douglas R Galasko Marla Gearing Daniel H Geschwind John R Gilbert Neill R Graff-Radford Robert C Green John H Growdon Ronald L Hamilton Lindy E Harrell Lawrence S Honig Matthew J Huentelman Christine M Hulette Bradley T Hyman Gail P Jarvik Erin Abner Lee-Way Jin Gyungah Jun Anna Karydas Jeffrey A Kaye Ronald Kim Neil W Kowall Joel H Kramer Frank M LaFerla James J Lah James B Leverenz Allan I Levey Ge Li Andrew P Lieberman Kathryn L Lunetta Constantine G Lyketsos Daniel C Marson Frank Martiniuk Deborah C Mash Eliezer Masliah Wayne C McCormick Susan M McCurry Andrew N McDavid Ann C McKee Marsel Mesulam Bruce L Miller Carol A Miller Joshua W Miller John C Morris Jill R Murrell Amanda J Myers Sid O'Bryant John M Olichney Vernon S Pankratz Joseph E Parisi Henry L Paulson William Perry Elaine Peskind Aimee Pierce Wayne W Poon Huntington Potter Joseph F Quinn Ashok Raj Murray Raskind Barry Reisberg Christiane Reitz John M Ringman Erik D Roberson Ekaterina Rogaeva Howard J Rosen Roger N Rosenberg Mark A Sager Andrew J Saykin Julie A Schneider Lon S Schneider William W Seeley Amanda G Smith Joshua A Sonnen Salvatore Spina Robert A Stern Russell H Swerdlow Rudolph E Tanzi Tricia A Thornton-Wells John Q Trojanowski Juan C Troncoso Vivianna M Van Deerlin Linda J Van Eldik Harry V Vinters Jean Paul Vonsattel Sandra Weintraub Kathleen A Welsh-Bohmer Kirk C Wilhelmsen Jennifer Williamson Thomas S Wingo Randall L Woltjer Clinton B Wright Chang-En Yu Lei Yu Fabienne Garzia Feroze Golamaully Gislain Septier Sebastien Engelborghs Rik Vandenberghe Peter P De Deyn Carmen Muñoz Fernadez Yoland Aladro Benito Hakan Thonberg Charlotte Forsell Lena Lilius Anne Kinhult-Stählbom Lena Kilander RoseMarie Brundin Letizia Concari Seppo Helisalmi Anne Maria Koivisto Annakaisa Haapasalo Vincent Dermecourt Nathalie Fievet Olivier Hanon Carole Dufouil Alexis Brice Karen Ritchie Bruno Dubois Jayanadra J Himali C Dirk Keene JoAnn Tschanz Annette L Fitzpatrick Walter A Kukull Maria Norton Thor Aspelund Eric B Larson Ron Munger Jerome I Rotter Richard B Lipton María J Bullido Albert Hofman Thomas J Montine Eliecer Coto Eric Boerwinkle Ronald C Petersen Victoria Alvarez Fernando Rivadeneira Eric M Reiman Maura Gallo Christopher J O'Donnell Joan S Reisch Amalia Cecilia Bruni Donald R Royall Martin Dichgans Mary Sano Daniela Galimberti Peter St George-Hyslop Elio Scarpini Debby W Tsuang Michelangelo Mancuso Ubaldo Bonuccelli Ashley R Winslow Antonio Daniele Chuang-Kuo Wu Oliver Peters Benedetta Nacmias Matthias Riemenschneider Reinhard Heun Carol Brayne David C Rubinsztein Jose Bras Rita Guerreiro Ammar Al-Chalabi Christopher E Shaw John Collinge David Mann Magda Tsolaki Jordi Clarimón Rebecca Sussams Simon Lovestone Michael C O'Donovan Michael J Owen Timothy W Behrens Simon Mead Alison M Goate Andre G Uitterlinden Clive Holmes Carlos Cruchaga Martin Ingelsson David A Bennett John Powell Todd E Golde Caroline Graff Philip L De Jager Kevin Morgan Nilufer Ertekin-Taner Onofre Combarros Bruce M Psaty Peter Passmore Steven G Younkin Claudine Berr Vilmundur Gudnason Dan Rujescu Dennis W Dickson Jean-François Dartigues Anita L DeStefano Sara Ortega-Cubero Hakon Hakonarson Dominique Campion Merce Boada John Keoni Kauwe Lindsay A Farrer Christine Van Broeckhoven M Arfan Ikram Lesley Jones Jonathan L Haines Christophe Tzourio Lenore J Launer Valentina Escott-Price Richard Mayeux Jean-François Deleuze Najaf Amin Peter A Holmans Margaret A Pericak-Vance Philippe Amouyel Cornelia M van Duijn Alfredo Ramirez Li-San Wang Jean-Charles Lambert Sudha Seshadri Julie Williams Gerard D Schellenberg

Nat Genet 2017 09 17;49(9):1373-1384. Epub 2017 Jul 17.

Penn Neurodegeneration Genomics Center, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

We identified rare coding variants associated with Alzheimer's disease in a three-stage case-control study of 85,133 subjects. In stage 1, we genotyped 34,174 samples using a whole-exome microarray. In stage 2, we tested associated variants (P < 1 × 10) in 35,962 independent samples using de novo genotyping and imputed genotypes. In stage 3, we used an additional 14,997 samples to test the most significant stage 2 associations (P < 5 × 10) using imputed genotypes. We observed three new genome-wide significant nonsynonymous variants associated with Alzheimer's disease: a protective variant in PLCG2 (rs72824905: p.Pro522Arg, P = 5.38 × 10, odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, minor allele frequency (MAF) = 0.0059, MAF = 0.0093), a risk variant in ABI3 (rs616338: p.Ser209Phe, P = 4.56 × 10, OR = 1.43, MAF = 0.011, MAF = 0.008), and a new genome-wide significant variant in TREM2 (rs143332484: p.Arg62His, P = 1.55 × 10, OR = 1.67, MAF = 0.0143, MAF = 0.0089), a known susceptibility gene for Alzheimer's disease. These protein-altering changes are in genes highly expressed in microglia and highlight an immune-related protein-protein interaction network enriched for previously identified risk genes in Alzheimer's disease. These genetic findings provide additional evidence that the microglia-mediated innate immune response contributes directly to the development of Alzheimer's disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng.3916DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5669039PMC
September 2017

Screening of the Gene in a Large Cohort of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients.

Circ Cardiovasc Genet 2017 Apr;10(2)

From the Unidad de Referencia de Cardiopatías Familiares-HUCA, Genética Molecular y Cardiología, Hospital Universitario Central Asturias, Oviedo, Spain (J.G., R.L., J.R.R., C.M., M.M., B.A., S.I., V.A., B.D.-M., P.A., E.C.); Fundación Asturcor, Spain (J.R.R., C.M.); Departamento de Medicina, Universidad de Oviedo, Spain (C.M., E.C.); Centro Salud El Cristo, Oviedo, Spain (S.T.); and Red de Investigación Renal (REDINREN), Madrid, Spain (E.C.).

Background: Recent exome sequencing studies identified filamin C () as a candidate gene for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Our aim was to determine the rate of candidate variants in a large cohort of HCM patients who were also sequenced for the main sarcomere genes.

Methods And Results: A total of 448 HCM patients were next generation-sequenced (semiconductor chip technology) for the , , , , , , , , and genes. We also sequenced 450 healthy controls from the same population. Based on the reported population frequencies, bioinformatic criteria, and familial segregation, we identified 20 candidate variants (13 new; 1 nonsense; and 19 missense) in 22 patients. Compared with the patients, only 1 of the control's missense variants was nonreported (=0.007; Fisher exact probability test). Based on the familial segregation and the reported functional studies, 6 of the candidate variants (in 7 patients) were finally classified as likely pathogenic, 10 as variants of uncertain significance, and 4 as likely benign.

Conclusions: We provide a compelling evidence of the involvement of in the development of HCM. Most of the variants were associated with mild forms of HCM and a reduced penetrance, with few affected in the families to confirm the segregation. Our work, together with others who found variants among patients with dilated and restrictive cardiomyopathies, pointed to this gene as an important cause of structural cardiomyopathies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.116.001584DOI Listing
April 2017

The p. R151C Polymorphism in MC1R Gene Modifies the Age of Onset in Spanish Huntington's Disease Patients.

Mol Neurobiol 2017 07 6;54(5):3906-3910. Epub 2016 Dec 6.

Dermatology Department, Melanoma Unit, Hospital Clinic & IDIBAPS (Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer), Barcelona, Spain.

The expansion of CAG repeats (≥36 CAG) in the HTT gene is the only known genetic cause of Huntington's disease (HD) and the main determinant of the course of the disease. The length of the expanded CAG repeats correlates inversely with the age of onset (AOO) but does not completely determine it. We investigated the role of the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene as a modifier factor of AOO in 600 HD patients from Spain. We sequenced the entire region of the MC1R gene and analyzed all the nonsynonymous MC1R genetic variants with a minor allele frequency of at least 0.01 in HD patients. The variability in AOO attributable to the CAG repeats and MC1R polymorphisms was evaluated using a multiple linear regression model. We found that the loss-of-function p. R151C MC1R polymorphism has a significant influence on the AOO (P = 0.004; Bonferroni-corrected P = 0.032) which explains 1.42% of the variance in AOO that cannot be accounted for by the expanded CAG repeat. Our results suggest that the MC1R gene could modify the AOO in Spanish HD patients and encourage the evaluation of loss-of-function MC1R polymorphisms in other HD populations with a higher frequency of these MC1R polymorphisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12035-016-0305-5DOI Listing
July 2017

KCNQ1 gene variants in the risk for type 2 diabetes and impaired renal function in the Spanish Renastur cohort.

Mol Cell Endocrinol 2016 May 9;427:86-91. Epub 2016 Mar 9.

Genética Molecular-Laboratorio Medicina, HUCA, Oviedo, Spain; Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain; Red investigacion renal (REDINREN), Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

Several common KCNQ1 gene polymorphisms have been associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and diabetic nephropathy. This effect is explained by the role of the kcnq1 protein as a potassium channel that in the pancreatic beta-cells drives an electrical signal that facilitates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The KCNQ1 gene is also expressed in the kidney, and could thus be implicated in the risk of developing impaired renal function. To test this hypothesis, we genotyped six common KCNQ1 gene variants (three single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs2237892, rs2237895, and rs231362, and three intronic indels) in 681 healthy elderly individuals (>65 years old) from the Spanish Renastur cohort. None of the six variants was associated with T2DM (180 diabetics vs. 581 non-diabetics). The intron 12 insertion allele was associated with a reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR<60, n = 90 vs. eGFR≥60, n = 591; II vs ID + DD genotypes, p = 0.031, OR = 2.06, 95%CI = 1.12-4.14). We also performed a next generation sequencing search of variants in the coding regions of the KCNQ1 gene in 100 individuals with the extreme eGFR values. We found two rare amino acid changes (p.K393N and p.P408A) and the 393 Asn variant was found only among diabetics (n = 4; p = 0.05). The two rare alleles were present in the two eGFR groups. Our results suggest that a common KCNQ1 intron 12 indel polymorphism is a risk factor for impaired renal function independent of T2DM. If this association is confirmed by others, further research to determine the mechanism that drives this association would be warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mce.2016.03.007DOI Listing
May 2016

Assessing the role of TUBA4A gene in frontotemporal degeneration.

Neurobiol Aging 2016 Feb 5;38:215.e13-215.e14. Epub 2015 Nov 5.

Memory Unit, Neurology Department and Sant Pau Biomedical Research Institute, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; CIBERNED, Center for Networked Biomedical Research into Neurodegenerative Diseases, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

The tubulin alpha 4a (TUBA4A) gene has been recently associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Interestingly, some of the mutation carriers were also diagnosed with frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) or mild cognitive impairment. With the aim to investigate the role of TUBA4A in FTD, we screened TUBA4A in a series of 814 FTD patients from Spain. Our data did not disclose any nonsense or missense variant in the cohort, thus suggesting that TUBA4A mutations are not associated with FTD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2015.10.030DOI Listing
February 2016

A labor and cost effective next generation sequencing of PKHD1 in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease patients.

Gene 2015 Apr 17;561(1):165-9. Epub 2015 Feb 17.

Genética-Laboratorio de Medicina, Hospital Universitario Central Asturias, Oviedo, Spain; Departamento de Medicina, Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain; Red de Investigación Renal (REDINREN), Madrid, Spain; Fundación Renal I. Alvarez de Toledo, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

The Sanger sequencing of patients with recessive polycystic kidney disease is challenging due to the length and heterogeneous mutational spectrum of the PKHD1 gene. Next generation sequencing (NGS) might thus be of special interest to search for PKHD1 mutations. The study involved a total of 22 patients with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) and 8 parents of non-available ARPKD patients. Five pools of 6 samples each were sequenced with the Personal Genome Machine (PGM, Ion Torrent). For each DNA pool, a total of 109 fragments that covered the entire PKHD1 coding sequence were amplified in only two tubes followed by library preparation and NGS with the PGM. To validate the technique, each pool contained the DNA of at least one patient with known mutation. The putative mutations identified in each pool were confirmed and assigned to specific individuals through Sanger sequencing. All but one of the 109 amplicons were successfully read, and we identified the two PKHD1 mutations in 11 of the ARPKD cases, one mutation in 9 patients, and no mutation in only 2 patients. Six of the 8 parents from non-available patients were mutation carriers. The reported procedure would facilitate the large scale analysis of PKHD1 with a significant reduction in cost and labor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gene.2015.02.040DOI Listing
April 2015

Mutations in filamin C cause a new form of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

Nat Commun 2014 Oct 29;5:5326. Epub 2014 Oct 29.

Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Medicina, Instituto Universitario de Oncología-IUOPA, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo, Spain.

Mutations in different genes encoding sarcomeric proteins are responsible for 50-60% of familial cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM); however, the genetic alterations causing the disease in one-third of patients are currently unknown. Here we describe a case with familial HCM of unknown cause. Whole-exome sequencing reveals a variant in the gene encoding the sarcomeric protein filamin C (p.A1539T) that segregates with the disease in this family. Sequencing of 92 HCM cases identifies seven additional variants segregating with the disease in eight families. Patients with FLNC mutations show marked sarcomeric abnormalities in cardiac muscle, and functional analysis reveals that expression of these FLNC variants resulted in the formation of large filamin C aggregates. Clinical studies indicate that FLNC-mutated patients have higher incidence of sudden cardiac death. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that mutations in the gene encoding the sarcomeric protein filamin C cause a new form of familial HMC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms6326DOI Listing
October 2014

Mutation analysis of the main hypertrophic cardiomyopathy genes using multiplex amplification and semiconductor next-generation sequencing.

Circ J 2014 22;78(12):2963-71. Epub 2014 Oct 22.

Molecular Genetics Dept-Laboratory of Medicine-Renal Foundation (IRSIN-FRIAT), Hospital Central Asturias.

Background: Mutations in at least 30 genes have been linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Due to the large size of the main HCM genes, Sanger sequencing is labor intensive and expensive. The purpose was to develop a next-generation sequencing (NGS) procedure for the main HCM genes. METHODS AND RESULTS: Multiplex amplification of the coding exons of MYH7,MYBPC3,TNNT2,TNNI3,ACTC1,TNNC1,MYL2,MYL3, and TPM1 was designated, followed by NGS with the Ion Torrent PGM (Life Technologies). A total of 8 pools containing DNA from HCM patients were sequenced in a 2-step approach. First, a total of 60 patients (validation cohort) underwent both PGM and Sanger sequencing for the 9 genes. No false-negative variants were found on NGS (100% sensitivity), and a specificity of 97% and 80% was achieved for single-nucleotide and insertion/deletion variants, respectively. Second, the PGM was used to search for mutations in a total of 76 cases not previously studied (discovery cohort). A total of 19 putative mutations were identified in the discovery pools, which were confirmed and assigned to specific patients on Sanger sequencing.

Conclusions: An NGS procedure has been developed for the main sarcomeric genes that would facilitate the screening of large cohorts of patients. In addition, this procedure would facilitate the uncovering of rare gene variants on a population scale.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1253/circj.cj-14-0628DOI Listing
July 2015

MiRNA profile in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease and healthy subjects.

J Mol Neurosci 2014 Dec 5;54(4):830-6. Epub 2014 Oct 5.

Genética Molecular-Laboratorio de Medicina, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, 33006, Oviedo, Spain.

The deregulation of several microRNAs (miRNAs) has been associated with neurodegenerative processes, including Parkinson's disease (PD). Our aim was to characterize the level of miRNAs in the substantia nigra (SN) of PD patients and healthy donors. This is an important issue to characterize new putative markers and therapeutic targets for PD. RNA was extracted from the SN of postmortem PD (n=8) and healthy (n=4) subjects, and the level of 733 human miRNAs was assayed with TaqMan low-density arrays (TLDAs). Overall, there was a miRNA downregulation in the SN of patients. The mean level of 11 miRNAs was significantly different (p<0.05) between patients and controls, with 10 downregulated among the patients. MiR-198, -135b, -485-5p, and -548d were the best candidates and were quantified with individual TaqMan assays in the 12 samples. MiR-135b showed the most significant difference between patients and healthy donors. The bioinformatic analysis suggested that this miRNA could bind to genes implicated in several neurodegenerative pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12031-014-0428-yDOI Listing
December 2014

Endothelial (NOS3 E298D) and inducible (NOS2 exon 22) nitric oxide synthase polymorphisms, as well as plasma NOx, influence sepsis development.

Nitric Oxide 2014 Nov 16;42:79-86. Epub 2014 Sep 16.

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Oviedo University School of Medicine, Oviedo, Spain.

Introduction: Nitric oxide (NO) influences susceptibility to infection and hemodynamic failure (HF) in sepsis. NOS3 and NOS2 SNPs might modify plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) levels, sepsis development, hemodynamics and survival.

Methods: 90 severely septic and 91 non-infected ICU patients were prospectively studied. NOS3 (E298D), NOS3 (-786 T/C), NOS3 (27 bp-VNTR), and NOS2A (exon 22) SNPs and plasma NOx levels were assessed.

Results: 21 patients (11.6%) died, 7 with sepsis. TT homozygotes and T allele carriers of NOS3 (E298D) and AG carriers of the NOS2A (exon 22) SNPs were more frequent among septic compared to non-infected ICU patients (p < 0.05). Plasma NOx was higher in septic, especially in septic with hemodynamic failure (HF) or fatal outcome (p < 0.006). Plasma NOx was higher in carriers of the T allele of the NOS3 (E298D) SNP (p = 0.006). Sepsis independently associated with HF, increased NOx, peripheral neutrophils, and fibrinogen levels, decreased prothrombin and the presence of the NOS3 (E298D) and NOS2A (exon 22) SNPs. A low APACHE II score was the only variable associated with sepsis survival. NOx was independently associated with sepsis, HF, decreased neutrophils and higher APACHE.

Conclusions: NOS3 (E298D) and NOS2A (exon 22) SNPs, individually and in combination, and plasma NOx, associated with sepsis development. NOx associated with HF and fatal outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.niox.2014.09.004DOI Listing
November 2014

Gene-wide analysis detects two new susceptibility genes for Alzheimer's disease.

Authors:
Valentina Escott-Price Céline Bellenguez Li-San Wang Seung-Hoan Choi Denise Harold Lesley Jones Peter Holmans Amy Gerrish Alexey Vedernikov Alexander Richards Anita L DeStefano Jean-Charles Lambert Carla A Ibrahim-Verbaas Adam C Naj Rebecca Sims Gyungah Jun Joshua C Bis Gary W Beecham Benjamin Grenier-Boley Giancarlo Russo Tricia A Thornton-Wells Nicola Denning Albert V Smith Vincent Chouraki Charlene Thomas M Arfan Ikram Diana Zelenika Badri N Vardarajan Yoichiro Kamatani Chiao-Feng Lin Helena Schmidt Brian Kunkle Melanie L Dunstan Maria Vronskaya Andrew D Johnson Agustin Ruiz Marie-Thérèse Bihoreau Christiane Reitz Florence Pasquier Paul Hollingworth Olivier Hanon Annette L Fitzpatrick Joseph D Buxbaum Dominique Campion Paul K Crane Clinton Baldwin Tim Becker Vilmundur Gudnason Carlos Cruchaga David Craig Najaf Amin Claudine Berr Oscar L Lopez Philip L De Jager Vincent Deramecourt Janet A Johnston Denis Evans Simon Lovestone Luc Letenneur Isabel Hernández David C Rubinsztein Gudny Eiriksdottir Kristel Sleegers Alison M Goate Nathalie Fiévet Matthew J Huentelman Michael Gill Kristelle Brown M Ilyas Kamboh Lina Keller Pascale Barberger-Gateau Bernadette McGuinness Eric B Larson Amanda J Myers Carole Dufouil Stephen Todd David Wallon Seth Love Ekaterina Rogaeva John Gallacher Peter St George-Hyslop Jordi Clarimon Alberto Lleo Anthony Bayer Debby W Tsuang Lei Yu Magda Tsolaki Paola Bossù Gianfranco Spalletta Petra Proitsi John Collinge Sandro Sorbi Florentino Sanchez Garcia Nick C Fox John Hardy Maria Candida Deniz Naranjo Paolo Bosco Robert Clarke Carol Brayne Daniela Galimberti Elio Scarpini Ubaldo Bonuccelli Michelangelo Mancuso Gabriele Siciliano Susanne Moebus Patrizia Mecocci Maria Del Zompo Wolfgang Maier Harald Hampel Alberto Pilotto Ana Frank-García Francesco Panza Vincenzo Solfrizzi Paolo Caffarra Benedetta Nacmias William Perry Manuel Mayhaus Lars Lannfelt Hakon Hakonarson Sabrina Pichler Minerva M Carrasquillo Martin Ingelsson Duane Beekly Victoria Alvarez Fanggeng Zou Otto Valladares Steven G Younkin Eliecer Coto Kara L Hamilton-Nelson Wei Gu Cristina Razquin Pau Pastor Ignacio Mateo Michael J Owen Kelley M Faber Palmi V Jonsson Onofre Combarros Michael C O'Donovan Laura B Cantwell Hilkka Soininen Deborah Blacker Simon Mead Thomas H Mosley David A Bennett Tamara B Harris Laura Fratiglioni Clive Holmes Renee F A G de Bruijn Peter Passmore Thomas J Montine Karolien Bettens Jerome I Rotter Alexis Brice Kevin Morgan Tatiana M Foroud Walter A Kukull Didier Hannequin John F Powell Michael A Nalls Karen Ritchie Kathryn L Lunetta John S K Kauwe Eric Boerwinkle Matthias Riemenschneider Mercè Boada Mikko Hiltunen Eden R Martin Reinhold Schmidt Dan Rujescu Jean-François Dartigues Richard Mayeux Christophe Tzourio Albert Hofman Markus M Nöthen Caroline Graff Bruce M Psaty Jonathan L Haines Mark Lathrop Margaret A Pericak-Vance Lenore J Launer Christine Van Broeckhoven Lindsay A Farrer Cornelia M van Duijn Alfredo Ramirez Sudha Seshadri Gerard D Schellenberg Philippe Amouyel Julie Williams

PLoS One 2014 12;9(6):e94661. Epub 2014 Jun 12.

Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics & Genomics, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.

Background: Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study sought to identify new susceptibility genes, using an alternative gene-wide analytical approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over 7 m genotypes from 25,580 Alzheimer's cases and 48,466 controls.

Principal Findings: In addition to earlier reported genes, we detected genome-wide significant loci on chromosomes 8 (TP53INP1, p = 1.4×10-6) and 14 (IGHV1-67 p = 7.9×10-8) which indexed novel susceptibility loci.

Significance: The additional genes identified in this study, have an array of functions previously implicated in Alzheimer's disease, including aspects of energy metabolism, protein degradation and the immune system and add further weight to these pathways as potential therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0094661PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4055488PMC
October 2015