Publications by authors named "Veronika Eroukova"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Global functional atlas of Escherichia coli encompassing previously uncharacterized proteins.

PLoS Biol 2009 Apr;7(4):e96

Banting and Best Department of Medical Research, Terrence Donnelly Center for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

One-third of the 4,225 protein-coding genes of Escherichia coli K-12 remain functionally unannotated (orphans). Many map to distant clades such as Archaea, suggesting involvement in basic prokaryotic traits, whereas others appear restricted to E. coli, including pathogenic strains. To elucidate the orphans' biological roles, we performed an extensive proteomic survey using affinity-tagged E. coli strains and generated comprehensive genomic context inferences to derive a high-confidence compendium for virtually the entire proteome consisting of 5,993 putative physical interactions and 74,776 putative functional associations, most of which are novel. Clustering of the respective probabilistic networks revealed putative orphan membership in discrete multiprotein complexes and functional modules together with annotated gene products, whereas a machine-learning strategy based on network integration implicated the orphans in specific biological processes. We provide additional experimental evidence supporting orphan participation in protein synthesis, amino acid metabolism, biofilm formation, motility, and assembly of the bacterial cell envelope. This resource provides a "systems-wide" functional blueprint of a model microbe, with insights into the biological and evolutionary significance of previously uncharacterized proteins.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1000096DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2672614PMC
April 2009

Chemical-genetic profile analysis in yeast suggests that a previously uncharacterized open reading frame, YBR261C, affects protein synthesis.

BMC Genomics 2008 Dec 3;9:583. Epub 2008 Dec 3.

Department of Biology, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, K1S 5B6, Canada.

Background: Functional genomics has received considerable attention in the post-genomic era, as it aims to identify function(s) for different genes. One way to study gene function is to investigate the alterations in the responses of deletion mutants to different stimuli. Here we investigate the genetic profile of yeast non-essential gene deletion array (yGDA, approximately 4700 strains) for increased sensitivity to paromomycin, which targets the process of protein synthesis.

Results: As expected, our analysis indicated that the majority of deletion strains (134) with increased sensitivity to paromomycin, are involved in protein biosynthesis. The remaining strains can be divided into smaller functional categories: metabolism (45), cellular component biogenesis and organization (28), DNA maintenance (21), transport (20), others (38) and unknown (39). These may represent minor cellular target sites (side-effects) for paromomycin. They may also represent novel links to protein synthesis. One of these strains carries a deletion for a previously uncharacterized ORF, YBR261C, that we term TAE1 for Translation Associated Element 1. Our focused follow-up experiments indicated that deletion of TAE1 alters the ribosomal profile of the mutant cells. Also, gene deletion strain for TAE1 has defects in both translation efficiency and fidelity. Miniaturized synthetic genetic array analysis further indicates that TAE1 genetically interacts with 16 ribosomal protein genes. Phenotypic suppression analysis using TAE1 overexpression also links TAE1 to protein synthesis.

Conclusion: We show that a previously uncharacterized ORF, YBR261C, affects the process of protein synthesis and reaffirm that large-scale genetic profile analysis can be a useful tool to study novel gene function(s).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2164-9-583DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2613417PMC
December 2008

Colicin occlusion of OmpF and TolC channels: outer membrane translocons for colicin import.

Biophys J 2004 Dec 1;87(6):3901-11. Epub 2004 Oct 1.

Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA.

The interaction of colicins with target cells is a paradigm for protein import. To enter cells, bactericidal colicins parasitize Escherichia coli outer membrane receptors whose physiological purpose is the import of essential metabolites. Colicins E1 and E3 initially bind to the BtuB receptor, whose beta-barrel pore is occluded by an N-terminal globular "plug". The x-ray structure of a complex of BtuB with the coiled-coil BtuB-binding domain of colicin E3 did not reveal displacement of the BtuB plug that would allow passage of the colicin (Kurisu, G., S. D. Zakharov, M. V. Zhalnina, S. Bano, V. Y. Eroukova, T. I. Rokitskaya, Y. N. Antonenko, M. C. Wiener, and W. A. Cramer. 2003. Nat. Struct. Biol. 10:948-954). This correlates with the inability of BtuB to form ion channels in planar bilayers, shown in this work, suggesting that an additional outer membrane protein(s) is required for colicin import across the outer membrane. The identity and interaction properties of this OMP were analyzed in planar bilayer experiments.OmpF and TolC channels in planar bilayers were occluded by colicins E3 and E1, respectively, from the trans-side of the membrane. Occlusion was dependent upon a cis-negative transmembrane potential. A positive potential reversibly opened OmpF and TolC channels. Colicin N, which uses only OmpF for entry, occludes OmpF in planar bilayers with the same orientation constraints as colicins E1 and E3. The OmpF recognition sites of colicins E3 and N, and the TolC recognition site of colicin E1, were found to reside in the N-terminal translocation domains. These data are considered in the context of a two-receptor translocon model for colicin entry into cells.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1529/biophysj.104.046151DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1304901PMC
December 2004

The structure of BtuB with bound colicin E3 R-domain implies a translocon.

Nat Struct Biol 2003 Nov 5;10(11):948-54. Epub 2003 Oct 5.

Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, Lilly Hall of Life Sciences, 915 W. State St., West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-1392, USA.

Cellular import of colicin E3 is initiated by the Escherichia coli outer membrane cobalamin transporter, BtuB. The 135-residue 100-A coiled-coil receptor-binding domain (R135) of colicin E3 forms a 1:1 complex with BtuB whose structure at a resolution of 2.75 A is reported. Binding of R135 to the BtuB extracellular surface (DeltaG(o) = -12 kcal mol(-1)) is mediated by 27 residues of R135 near the coiled-coil apex. Formation of the R135-BtuB complex results in unfolding of R135 N- and C-terminal ends, inferred to be important for unfolding of the colicin T-domain. Small conformational changes occur in the BtuB cork and barrel domains but are insufficient to form a translocation channel. The absence of a channel and the peripheral binding of R135 imply that BtuB serves to bind the colicin, and that the coiled-coil delivers the colicin to a neighboring outer membrane protein for translocation, thus forming a colicin translocon. The translocator was concluded to be OmpF from the occlusion of OmpF channels by colicin E3.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nsb997DOI Listing
November 2003
-->