Publications by authors named "Vellalore Kakkanaiah"

8 Publications

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2019 White Paper on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis: FDA Immunogenicity Guidance, Gene Therapy, Critical Reagents, Biomarkers and Flow Cytometry Validation (Part 3 - Recommendations on 2019 FDA Immunogenicity Guidance, Gene Therapy Bioanalytical Challenges, Strategies for Critical Reagent Management, Biomarker Assay Validation, Flow Cytometry Validation & CLSI H62).

Bioanalysis 2019 Dec 10;11(24):2207-2244. Epub 2019 Dec 10.

Janssen R&D, Spring House, PA, USA.

The 2019 13 Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis (WRIB) took place in New Orleans, LA, USA on April 1-5, 2019 with an attendance of over 1000 representatives from pharmaceutical/biopharmaceutical companies, biotechnology companies, contract research organizations and regulatory agencies worldwide. WRIB was once again a 5-day, week-long event - a full immersion week of bioanalysis, biomarkers, immunogenicity and gene therapy. As usual, it was specifically designed to facilitate sharing, reviewing, discussing and agreeing on approaches to address the most current issues of interest including both small- and large-molecule bioanalysis involving LCMS, hybrid LBA/LCMS, LBA cell-based/flow cytometry assays and qPCR approaches. This 2019 White Paper encompasses recommendations emerging from the extensive discussions held during the workshop and is aimed to provide the bioanalytical community with key information and practical solutions on topics and issues addressed, in an effort to enable advances in scientific excellence, improved quality and better regulatory compliance. Due to its length, the 2019 edition of this comprehensive White Paper has been divided into three parts for editorial reasons. This publication (Part 3) covers New Insights in Biomarker Assay Validation, Current & Effective Strategies for Critical Reagent Management, Flow Cytometry Validation in Drug Discovery & Development & CLSI H62, Interpretation of the 2019 FDA Immunogenicity Guidance and Gene Therapy Bioanalytical Challenges. Part 1 (Innovation in Small Molecules and Oligonucleotides & Mass Spectrometry Method Development Strategies for Large Molecule Bioanalysis) and Part 2 (Recommendations on the 2018 FDA BMV Guidance, 2019 ICH M10 BMV Draft Guideline and regulatory agencies' input on bioanalysis, biomarkers, immunogenicity and gene therapy) are published in volume 11 of , issues 22 and 23 (2019), respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio-2019-0271DOI Listing
December 2019

Evaluation of sample stability for cellular kinetics and pharmacodynamic flow cytometry methods.

Bioanalysis 2019 Oct;11(20):1881-1884

Biomarker Laboratories, PPD, Richmond, VA 23230, USA.

We evaluated the sample stability for a cellular kinetics and a pharmacodynamic flow cytometry methods. First, the blood collection tubes were compared for the enumeration of chimeric antigen receptor-T cells in human whole blood. Blood samples with chimeric antigen receptor-T cells were stable up to 3 days at room temperature in both conventional EDTA and Cyto-Chex blood collection tubes (Streck Laboratories, NE, USA), but with better consistency in Cyto-Chex-BCT than conventional EDTA tubes. Second, sample storage temperatures were compared for the basophil activation test in human whole blood samples. The samples were stable up to 3 days for basophil activation test when stored at refrigerator temperature, but not stable when stored at room temperature. It is crucial during the development of method to evaluate all the variables which might impact sample integrity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio-2019-0170DOI Listing
October 2019

12th GCC Closed Forum: critical reagents; oligonucleotides; CoA; method transfer; HRMS; flow cytometry; regulatory findings; stability and immunogenicity.

Bioanalysis 2019 Jun 19;11(12):1129-1138. Epub 2019 Jul 19.

WuXi Apptec, Plainsboro, NJ 08536, USA.

The 12th GCC Closed Forum was held in Philadelphia, PA, USA, on 9 April 2018. Representatives from international bioanalytical Contract Research Organizations were in attendance in order to discuss scientific and regulatory issues specific to bioanalysis. The issues discussed at the meeting included: critical reagents; oligonucleotides; certificates of analysis; method transfer; high resolution mass spectrometry; flow cytometry; recent regulatory findings and case studies involving stability and nonclinical immunogenicity. Conclusions and consensus from discussions of these topics are included in this article.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio-2019-0131DOI Listing
June 2019

Recommendations for classification of commercial LBA kits for biomarkers in drug development from the GCC for bioanalysis.

Bioanalysis 2019 Apr 17;11(7):645-653. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

WuXi Apptec, Plainsboro, NJ, USA.

Over the last decade, the use of biomarker data has become integral to drug development. Biomarkers are not only utilized for internal decision-making by sponsors; they are increasingly utilized to make critical decisions for drug safety and efficacy. As the regulatory agencies are routinely making decisions based on biomarker data, there has been significant scrutiny on the validation of biomarker methods. Contract research organizations regularly use commercially available immunoassay kits to validate biomarker methods. However, adaptation of such kits in a regulated environment presents significant challenges and was one of the key topics discussed during the 12th Global Contract Research Organization Council for Bioanalysis (GCC) meeting. This White Paper reports the GCC members' opinion on the challenges facing the industry and the GCC recommendations on the classification of commercial kits that can be a win-win for commercial kit vendors and end users.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio-2019-0072DOI Listing
April 2019

2018 White Paper on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis: focus on flow cytometry, gene therapy, cut points and key clarifications on BAV (Part 3 - LBA/cell-based assays: immunogenicity, biomarkers and PK assays).

Bioanalysis 2018 Dec 29;10(24):1973-2001. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Amador Bioscience, Pleasanton, CA, USA (formerly of OncoMed, Redwood City, CA, USA).

The 2018 12 Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis took place in Philadelphia, PA, USA on April 9-13, 2018 with an attendance of over 900 representatives from pharmaceutical/biopharmaceutical companies, biotechnology companies, contract research organizations and regulatory agencies worldwide. WRIB was once again a 5-day full immersion in bioanalysis, biomarkers and immunogenicity. As usual, it was specifically designed to facilitate sharing, reviewing, discussing and agreeing on approaches to address the most current issues of interest including both small- and large-molecule bioanalysis involving LCMS, hybrid LBA/LCMS and LBA/cell-based assays approaches. This 2018 White Paper encompasses recommendations emerging from the extensive discussions held during the workshop and is aimed to provide the bioanalytical community with key information and practical solutions on topics and issues addressed, in an effort to enable advances in scientific excellence, improved quality and better regulatory compliance. Due to its length, the 2018 edition of this comprehensive White Paper has been divided into three parts for editorial reasons. This publication (Part 3) covers the recommendations for large molecule bioanalysis, biomarkers and immunogenicity using LBA and cell-based assays. Part 1 (LCMS for small molecules, peptides, oligonucleotides and small molecule biomarkers) and Part 2 (hybrid LBA/LCMS for biotherapeutics and regulatory agencies' inputs) are published in volume 10 of , issues 22 and 23 (2018), respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio-2018-0287DOI Listing
December 2018

Flow cytometry in cell-based pharmacokinetics or cellular kinetics in adoptive cell therapy.

Bioanalysis 2018 09 14;10(18):1457-1459. Epub 2018 Sep 14.

PPD Laboratories, 2244 Dabney Road, Richmond, VA 23230, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio-2018-0203DOI Listing
September 2018

Implementation of highly sophisticated flow cytometry assays in multicenter clinical studies: considerations and guidance.

Bioanalysis 2015 ;7(10):1299-311

1Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Basel, Switzerland.

Flow cytometry is increasingly becoming an important technology for biomarkers used in drug discovery and development. Within clinical development flow cytometry is used for the determination of PD biomarkers, disease or efficacy biomarkers or patient stratification biomarkers. Significant differences exist between flow cytometry methodology and other widely used technologies measuring soluble biomarkers including ligand binding and mass spectrometry. These differences include the very heavy reliance on aspects of sample processing techniques as well as sample stabilization to ensure viable samples. These differences also require exploration of new approaches and wider discussion regarding method validation requirements. This paper provides a review of the current challenges, solutions, regulatory environment and recommendations for the application of flow cytometry to measure biomarkers in clinical development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio.15.61DOI Listing
February 2016

Hypoestoxide, a natural nonmutagenic diterpenoid with antiangiogenic and antitumor activity: possible mechanisms of action.

Cancer Res 2002 Jul;62(14):4007-14

Immune Modulation, Inc. and Paraquest, Inc., Bloomington, California 92316, USA.

We have shown previously that hypoestoxide (HE), a natural diterpenoid [a bicyclo (9, 3, 1) pentadecane], is a potent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. In this report, we demonstrate that HE also inhibits the growth of a variety of human and murine tumor cell lines in vitro at concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 10 microM and was inactive as a mutagen in the Ames test. HE exhibited highly potent (0.3-10 mg/kg dose ranges) activities against B16 melanoma growth in C57BL/6 mice and P388D1 leukemia in C57BL/6 x DBA/2 F(1) mice, respectively. At a low maximal effective dose of 5 mg/kg, HE induced significant in vivo antitumor activities that were better than or comparable with most of the standard chemotherapeutic antiangiogenic agents tested: cortisone acetate, vincristine, bleomycin, Adriamycin, 5-fluorouracil, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide. All of the agents, except vincristine, had much higher maximal effective doses than HE. HE arrested the growth of human Burkitt lymphoma CA46 cells and HeLa (cervical epitheloid carcinoma) cells in the G2-M phase of the cell cycle, which was caused by interference, either direct or indirect, with actin assembly. Thus, the cell cycle arrest occurred at cytokinesis, as demonstrated by an increase in the number of binucleate cells. Moreover, HE inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor-induced cell proliferation in vitro, with an IC(50) of 28.6 microM, and it significantly inhibited basic fibroblast growth factor-induced angiogenesis on the chick chorioallantoic membrane, with an IC50 of 10 microM. Furthermore, HE inhibited endothelial cell migration on vitronectin, collagen, and fibronectin. Besides its activity as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, HE also has promise for the chemotherapy of cancer.
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July 2002