Publications by authors named "Varvara Brilliantova"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Relative expansion of CD19-negative very-early normal B-cell precursors in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia after CD19 targeting by blinatumomab and CAR-T cell therapy: implications for flow cytometric detection of minimal residual disease.

Br J Haematol 2021 May 14;193(3):602-612. Epub 2021 Mar 14.

National Research and Clinical Center for Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology, Moscow, Russian Federation.

CD19-directed treatment in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL) frequently leads to the downmodulation of targeted antigens. As multicolour flow cytometry (MFC) application for minimal/measurable residual disease (MRD) assessment in BCP-ALL is based on B-cell compartment study, CD19 loss could hamper MFC-MRD monitoring after blinatumomab or chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapy. The use of other antigens (CD22, CD10, CD79a, etc.) as B-lineage gating markers allows the identification of CD19-negative leukaemia, but it could also lead to misidentification of normal very-early CD19-negative BCPs as tumour blasts. In the current study, we summarized the results of the investigation of CD19-negative normal BCPs in 106 children with BCP-ALL who underwent CD19 targeting (blinatumomab, n = 64; CAR-T, n = 25; or both, n = 17). It was found that normal CD19-negative BCPs could be found in bone marrow after CD19-directed treatment more frequently than in healthy donors and children with BCP-ALL during chemotherapy or after stem cell transplantation. Analysis of the antigen expression profile revealed that normal CD19-negative BCPs could be mixed up with residual leukaemic blasts, even in bioinformatic analyses of MFC data. The results of our study should help to investigate MFC-MRD more accurately in patients who have undergone CD19-targeted therapy, even in cases with normal CD19-negative BCP expansion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.17382DOI Listing
May 2021

Chimerism evaluation in measurable residual disease-suspected cells isolated by flow cell sorting as a reliable tool for measurable residual disease verification in acute leukemia patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Cytometry B Clin Cytom 2020 Dec 28. Epub 2020 Dec 28.

Dmitry Rogachev National Medical Research Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology, Moscow, Russia.

Background: The presence of minimal/measurable residual disease (MRD) before or after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is known as a predictor of poor outcome in patients with acute myeloid (AML) or lymphoblastic (ALL) leukemia. When performed with multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC), assessment of residual leukemic cells after HSCT may be limited by therapy-induced shifts in the immunophenotype (e.g., loss of surface molecules used for therapeutic targeting). However, in such cases, questionable cells can be isolated and tested for hematopoietic chimerism to clarify their origin.

Methods: Questionable cell populations were detected during the MFC-based MRD monitoring of 52 follow-up bone marrow samples from 37 patients diagnosed with T cell neoplasms (n =14), B cell precursor ALL (n = 16), AML (n = 7). These cells (suspected leukemic or normal) were isolated by flow cell sorting and tested for hematopoietic chimerism by RTQ-PCR.

Results: The origin of cells was successfully identified in 96.15% of cases (n = 50), which helped to validate the results of MFC-based MRD monitoring.

Conclusions: We believe that a combination of MFC, cell sorting, and chimerism testing may help confirm or disprove MRD presence in complicated cases after HSCT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cyto.b.21982DOI Listing
December 2020

Treosulfan-Based Conditioning Regimen in Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation with TCRαβ/CD19 Depletion in Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome.

J Clin Immunol 2020 08 30;40(6):861-871. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Department of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Dmitry Rogachev National Medical Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology, Samory Mashela str, Moscow, Russia, 117997.

Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a DNA repair disorder characterized by combined immunodeficiency and a high predisposition to malignancies. HSCT appears to cure immunodeficiency, but remains challenging due to limited experience in long-term risks of transplant-associated toxicity and malignancies. Twenty NBS patients received 22 allogeneic HSCTs with TCRαβ/CD19+ graft depletion with fludarabine 150 mg/m, cyclophosphamide 20-40 mg/kg and thymoglobulin 5 mg/kg based conditioning regimens (CRs). Twelve patients additionally received low-dose busulfan 4 mg/kg (Bu group) and 10 patients (including 2 recipients of a second HSCT) treosulfan (Treo group) 30 g/m. Overall and event-free survival were 0.75 vs 1 (p = 0.16) and 0.47 vs 0.89 (p = 0.1) in the Bu and Treo groups, respectively. In the Bu group, four patients developed graft rejection, and three died: two died of de novo and relapsed lymphomas and one died of adenoviral hepatitis. The four living patients exhibited split chimerism with predominantly recipient myeloid cells and predominantly donor T and B lymphocytes. In Treo group, one patient developed rhabdomyosarcoma. There was no difference in the incidence of GVHD, viral reactivation, or early toxicity between either group. Low-dose Bu-containing CR in NBS leads to increased graft failure and low donor myeloid chimerism. Treo-CR followed by TCRαβ/CD19-depleted HSCT demonstrates a low level of early transplant-associated toxicity and enhanced graft function with stable donor chimerism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10875-020-00811-9DOI Listing
August 2020

αβ T Cell-Depleted Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation without Antithymocyte Globulin in Children with Chemorefractory Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2019 05 21;25(5):e179-e182. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Department of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Dmitriy Rogachev National Medical Research Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, and Immunology, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address:

We evaluated the outcome of αβ T cell-depleted haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in a cohort of children with chemorefractory acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Twenty-two patients with either primary refractory (n = 10) or relapsed refractory (n = 12) AML in active disease status received a transplant from haploidentical donors. The preparative regimen included cytoreduction with fludarabine and cytarabine and subsequent myeloablative conditioning with treosulfan and thiotepa. Antithymocyte globulin was substituted with tocilizumab in all patients and also with abatacept in 10 patients. Grafts were peripheral blood stem cells engineered by αβ T cell and CD19 depletion. Post-transplantation prophylactic therapy included infusion of donor lymphocytes, composed of a CD45RA-depleted fraction with or without a hypomethylating agent. Complete remission was achieved in 21 patients (95%). The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 18%, and the cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 23%. At 2 years, transplantation-related mortality was 9%, relapse rate was 42%, event-free survival was 49%, and overall survival was 53%. Our data suggest that αβ T cell-depleted haploidentical HSCT provides a reasonable chance of long-term survival in a cohort of children with chemorefractory AML and creates a solid basis for further improvement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2019.01.023DOI Listing
May 2019

Risk Factors for and the Clinical Impact of Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus Infections in Pediatric Recipients of TCR-α/β- and CD19-Depleted Grafts.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2017 Mar 27;23(3):483-490. Epub 2016 Dec 27.

Department of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Dmitriy Rogachev Federal Center for Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address:

Alpha/beta T cell and CD19 depletion are used to improve the outcomes of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We evaluated the burden of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in pediatric patients after this HSCT type. A cohort of 182 patients with malignant (n = 114) or nonmalignant (n = 68) disorders was transplanted from either matched unrelated (n = 124) or haploidentical (n = 58) donors. The cumulative incidence of CMV and EBV viremia were 51% and 33%, respectively. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) grades II to IV, D-/R+ serology, and malignant HSCT indications were associated with increased risk of CMV viremia. CMV disease developed in 10 patients (6%). The occurrence of CMV viremia was not associated with inferior outcomes. Acute GVHD grade ≥ II was the only factor significantly associated with an increased risk of EBV viremia. Rituximab significantly decreased the rate of EBV reactivation in a subgroup that received a higher B cell dose in the graft. The rate of EBV-associated disease was .5%, and EBV viremia did not affect survival. TCR-α/β and CD19 depletion are associated with a significant rate of CMV viremia that does not affect survival. The hazard of EBV post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is eliminated by the combination of CD19 depletion and rituximab.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2016.12.635DOI Listing
March 2017

A fluorescent reporter detects details of aromatic ligand interference in drug-binding sites of human serum albumin.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2016 09 16;478(1):462-466. Epub 2016 Jun 16.

Moscow Research Institute of Psychiatry, 3 Poteshnaya, Moscow, 107076, Russia.

Human serum albumin (HSA) transports many ligands including small aromatic molecules: metabolites, drugs etc. Phenylbutazone is an anti-inflammatory drug, which binds to the drug-binding site I of HSA. Its interaction with this site has been studied using a fluorescent dye, CAPIDAN, whose fluorescence in serum originates from HSA and is sensitive to the changes in HSA site I in some diseases. Its fluorescence in HSA solutions is strongly suppressed by phenylbutazone. This phenomenon seems to be a basic sign of a simple drug-dye competition. However, a more detailed study of the time-resolved fluorescence decay of CAPIDAN has shown that phenylbutazone lowers fluorescence without changing the total amount of bound dye. In brief, the HSA-bound dye forms three populations due to three types of environment at the binding sites. The first two populations probably have a rather strong Coulomb interaction with the positive charge of residues Arginine 218 or Arginine 222 in site I and are responsible for approximately 90% of the total fluorescence. Phenylbutazone blocks this interaction and therefore lowers this fluorescence. At the same time the binding of the third population increases considerably in the presence of phenylbutazone, and, as a result, the actual number of bound dye molecules remains almost unchanged despite the ligand competition. So, time resolved fluorescence of the reporter allows to observe details of interactions and interference of aromatic ligands in drug binding site I of HSA both in isolated HSA and in serum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrc.2016.06.072DOI Listing
September 2016