Publications by authors named "Varittha Sritalahareuthai"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The Effect of Steaming and Fermentation on Nutritive Values, Antioxidant Activities, and Inhibitory Properties of Tea Leaves.

Foods 2021 Jan 8;10(1). Epub 2021 Jan 8.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Fermented tea (Cha-miang in Thai) is a local product made by traditional food preservation processes in Northern Thailand that involve steaming fresh tea leaves followed by fermenting in the dark. Information on changes in nutritive values, bioactive compounds, antioxidant activities, and health properties that occur during the steaming and fermenting processes of tea leaves is, however, limited. Changes in nutritive values, phenolics, antioxidant activities, and in vitro health properties through inhibition of key enzymes that control obesity (lipase), diabetes (α-amylase and α-glucosidase), hypertension (angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)), and Alzheimer's disease (cholinesterases (ChEs) and β-secretase (BACE-1)) of fermented tea were compared to the corresponding fresh and steamed tea leaves. Results showed that energy, carbohydrate, and vitamin B1 increased after steaming, while most nutrients including protein, dietary fiber, vitamins (B2, B3, and C), and minerals (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, and Zn) decreased after the steaming process. After fermentation, energy, fat, sodium, potassium, and iron contents increased, while calcium and vitamins (B1, B2, B3, and C) decreased compared to steamed tea leaves. However, the contents of vitamin B1 and iron were insignificantly different between fresh and fermented tea leaves. Five flavonoids (quercetin, kaempferol, cyanidin, myricetin, and apigenin) and three phenolic acids (gallic acid, caffeic acid, and -coumaric acid) were identified in the tea samples. Total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activities increased significantly after steaming and fermentation, suggesting structural changes in bioactive compounds during these processes. Steamed tea exhibited high inhibition against lipase, α-amylase, and α-glucosidase, while fermented tea possessed high anti-ChE and anti-ACE activities. Fresh tea exhibited high BACE-1 inhibitory activity. Results suggest that tea preparations (steaming and fermentation) play a significant role in the amounts of nutrients and bioactive compounds, which, in turn, affect the in vitro health properties. Knowledge gained from this research will support future investigations on in vivo health properties of fermented tea, as well as promote future food development of fermented tea as a healthy food.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods10010117DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7827290PMC
January 2021

Phenolic Profiles, Antioxidant, and Inhibitory Activities of (Roxb.) Craib and (Lem.) A.C. Sm.

Foods 2020 Sep 2;9(9). Epub 2020 Sep 2.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

spp. in the Schisandraceae family are woody vine plants, which produce edible red fruits that are rich in nutrients and antioxidant activities. Despite their valuable food applications, spp. are only able to grow naturally in the forest, and reproduction handled by botanists is still in progress with a very low growth rate. Subsequently, spp. were listed as endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) in 2011. Two different spp., including (Lem.) A.C. Sm. and (Roxb.) Craib, are mostly found in northern Thailand. These rare, wild fruits are unrecognizable to outsiders, and there have only been limited investigations into its biological properties. This study, therefore, aimed to comparatively investigate the phenolic profiles, antioxidant activities, and inhibitory activities against the key enzymes involved in diabetes (α-glucosidase and α-amylase) and Alzheimer's disease (acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and beta-secretase 1 (BACE-1)) in different fruit parts (exocarp, mesocarp (edible part), seed, and core) of (Lem.) A.C. Sm. and (Roxb.) Craib. The results suggested that Kadsura spp. extracts were rich in flavonol (quercetin), flavanone (naringenin), anthocyanidins (cyanidin and delphinidin), and anthocyanins (cyanidin 3--glucoside (kuromanin), cyanidin 3--galactoside (ideain), cyanidin 3--rutinoside (keracyanin), and cyanidin 3,5-di--glucoside (cyanin)). These flavonoids were found to be responsible for the high antioxidant activities and key enzyme inhibitions detected in spp. extracts. The findings of the present study can support further development of spp. as a potential source of phenolics and anti-oxidative agents with health benefits against diabetes and Alzheimer's disease. Besides, exocarp and the core of Kadsura spp. exhibited higher phenolic contents, antioxidant activities, and key enzyme inhibitory activities compared to the mesocarp and seeds, respectively. This information can promote the use of fruit parts other than the edible mesocarp for future food applications using spp. rather than these being wasted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods9091222DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7555767PMC
September 2020

The Effect of Sacred Lotus () and Its Mixtures on Phenolic Profiles, Antioxidant Activities, and Inhibitions of the Key Enzymes Relevant to Alzheimer's Disease.

Molecules 2020 Aug 14;25(16). Epub 2020 Aug 14.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Sacred lotus () has long been used as a food source and ingredient for traditional herbal remedies. Plant parts contain neuroprotective agents that interact with specific targets to inhibit Alzheimer's disease (AD). Organic solvents including methanol, ethyl acetate, hexane, and -butanol, are widely employed for extraction of sacred lotus but impact food safety. Seed embryo, flower stalk, stamen, old leaf, petal, and leaf stalk of sacred lotus were extracted using hot water (aqueous extraction). The extractions were analyzed for their bioactive constituents, antioxidant and anti-AD properties as key enzyme inhibitory activities toward acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and β-secretase 1 (BACE-1). Results showed that the sacred lotus stamen exhibited significant amounts of phenolics, including phenolic acids and flavonoids, that contributed to high antioxidant activity via both single electron transfer (SET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanisms, with anti-AChE, anti-BChE, and anti-BACE-1 activities. To enhance utilization of other sacred lotus parts, a combination of stamen, old leaf and petal as the three sacred lotus plant components with the highest phenolic contents, antioxidant activities, and enzyme inhibitory properties was analyzed. Antagonist interaction was observed, possibly from flavonoids-flavonoids interaction. Further in-depth elucidation of this issue is required. Findings demonstrated that an aqueous extract of the stamen has potential for application as a functional food to mitigate the onset of Alzheimer's disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules25163713DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7463813PMC
August 2020

Nutritional composition of conserved spp. plants in Northern Thailand.

Heliyon 2020 Jul 16;6(7):e04451. Epub 2020 Jul 16.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Phutthamonthon, Nakhon Pathom, 73170, Thailand.

The genus comprises woody vine plants belonging to the family . Species are found mostly in Northern Thailand and widely consumed by the local population. Occurrences of these wild fruits are rare as they only grow naturally in forest areas. Nutritive values of spp. remain unclear, leading to improper management for food applications. Nutritional composition of spp. was evaluated to promote sustainable conservation. Nutritive values in different fruits parts (exocarp, mesocarp, seed and core) of two species as (Lem.) A.C. Sm. and (Roxb.) Craib, from Chiang Rai Province, Thailand were assessed. When comparing nutritional contents based on per 100 g dry weight, results suggested that exhibited higher carbohydrate (1-2 times), sugar (1-2 times) and vitamin C (3-4 times) contents than , while the latter possessed higher fat (1-2 times), protein (1.6-1.9 times), and dietary fiber (1.5-1.8 times) contents. Considering each fruit part, the mesocarp (the only edible fruit part) and exocarp of both species provided high dietary fiber (11.6-20.9% recommended dietary fiber) and vitamin C (as high as 73% recommended per day) but were low in energy (30-40 kcal/100 g fresh weight), protein (0.6-1.2% recommended per day), fat (0.5-1.8% recommended per day) and sugar (2.4-5.4% recommended per day). Interestingly, seed contained higher energy (1-2 times), protein (2-3 times) and fat (4-50 times) than the other fruit parts. Results support the potential consumption of spp. as a healthy fruit that can be used for future food applications. Seed and exocarp from spp. also showed potential for new product development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2020.e04451DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7365980PMC
July 2020

Comparison of Phytochemicals, Antioxidant, and In Vitro Anti-Alzheimer Properties of Twenty-Seven spp. Cultivated in Thailand.

Molecules 2020 Jun 3;25(11). Epub 2020 Jun 3.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. To fight the disease, natural products, including mulberry, with antioxidant activities and inhibitory activities against key enzymes (acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and beta-secretase 1 (BACE-1)) are of interest. However, even in the same cultivars, mulberry trees grown in different populated locations might possess disparate amounts of phytochemical profiles, leading to dissimilar health properties, which cause problems when comparing different cultivars of mulberry. Therefore, this study aimed to comparatively investigate the phytochemicals, antioxidant activities, and inhibitory activities against AChE, BChE, and BACE-1, of twenty-seven spp. cultivated in the same planting area in Thailand. The results suggested that fruit samples were rich in phenolics, especially cyanidin, kuromanin, and keracyanin. Besides, the aqueous fruit extracts exhibited antioxidant activities, both in single electron transfer (SET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanisms, while strong inhibitory activities against AD key enzymes were observed. Interestingly, among the twenty-seven spp., sp. code SKSM 810191 with high phytochemicals, antioxidant activities and in vitro anti-AD properties is a promising cultivar for further developed as a potential mulberry resource with health benefits against AD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules25112600DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7321130PMC
June 2020
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