Publications by authors named "Vanessa Santos Sotomaior"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Anti-HLA Donor-Specific IgG Subclasses and C1q-binding Evolution in Posttransplant Monitoring.

Transplant Direct 2018 Sep 22;4(9):e385. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

School of Medicine, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Curitiba, PR, Brazil.

Background: The identification of low-level antibodies by single-antigen bead methodology has brought advancements to risk evaluation of kidney transplant recipients. However, the use of mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) to quantify antibodies and to guide therapy is not enough. Notably, immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass switching is hypothesized to follow a programmed sequence after an emergency signal from the germinal center. In transplantation this process is not clear yet. In the present study, we sequentially evaluate anti-HLA donor specific antibody (DSA) subclasses, their profile changes, and C1q-binding ability and the influence of those characteristics on antibody mediated rejection (AMR) occurrence and allograft function.

Methods: A total of 30 DSA-positive patients were tested for IgG subclass content and C1q-binding in sequential serum samples.

Results: Twenty-one patients were DSA-positive before transplant; patients sensitized only by transfusion or pregnancies had IgG1 and/or IgG3, and patients sensitized by both transfusion and pregnancies or previous transplant showed a broader range of IgG subclasses. C1q binding was detected in high MFI made up of IgG1 or multiple IgG subclasses. Only 4 patients were positive for C1q posttransplantation and 3 of these showed an increase in MFI, changes in subclasses patterns, AMR, and allograft dysfunction.

Conclusions: Posttransplant evaluation of DSA subclasses and the ability to bind C1q may be informative for both AMR occurrence and allograft dysfunction. Monitoring these events may help to better define risk and interventional time points.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TXD.0000000000000823DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6133409PMC
September 2018

Complement-fixing donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies and kidney allograft failure.

Transpl Immunol 2018 08 26;49:33-38. Epub 2018 Mar 26.

Transplant Immunology Laboratory, Hospital Universitário Cajuru, Curitiba, PR, Brazil. Electronic address:

Detection of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) has improved the risk classification and post-transplant evaluation of kidney recipients. Moreover, assessment of DSA C1q-binding ability has been shown to improve the individual risk classification of transplant patients for allograft loss, especially when detected after transplantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the additional clinical impact of C1q-binding DSA detection in a population that was extensively monitored for DSA and MFI alterations. Forty-two kidney allograft recipients were followed-up at multiple time points for up to 5 years after transplantation for the presence of anti-HLA DSA-IgG total. The samples that were positive for these antibodies were retrospectively tested for the presence of complement-binding antibodies. Overall, 24 patients presented DSA, 29% (7) of which also produced complement-binding DSA. Compared to patients with non-C1q-binding DSA and non-sensitized patients, patients with C1q-binding DSA after transplantation had the lowest allograft survival rate at 5 years (p = 0.042) and showed a lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (based on the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula) during the post-transplant follow-up period (p = 0.01). Thus, post-transplant monitoring for complement-binding DSA is a useful tool for predicting individuals most at risk for allograft failure, and might also be beneficial for evaluation of immunosuppression regimens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.trim.2018.03.002DOI Listing
August 2018

Parkin protein expression and its impact on survival of patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

Cancer Biol Med 2018 Feb;15(1):61-69

Group for Advanced Molecular Investigation (NIMA), School of Health and Biosciences, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná (PUCPR), Curitiba 80215-901, Brazil.

Objective: Features of colorectal cancer such as natural history, molecular, chromosomal, and epigenetic alterations have been well described. However, there is still a lack of accurate prognostic markers, which is evident by the lower overall survival rates of patients with advanced cancer. Although alterations in parkin protein expression have been described in colorectal cancer, the functional significance of this protein remains unknown. The present study aimed to investigate the involvement of parkin expression in colorectal adenocarcinoma development and progression by evaluating the association between its expression, clinicopathological parameters, and expression of known proteins involved in colorectal cancer.

Methods: Tissue microarrays consisting of 73 tumor and 64 normal tissue samples were generated to examine parkin expression and localization by immunohistochemistry.

Results: A positive correlation of parkin and APC expression was observed in the superficial, intermediate, and profound regions of all cases (ρ = 0.37; = 0.001). Parkin expression was also significantly associated with tumors in men ( = 0.049), those of the mucinous subtype ( = 0.028), and of advanced stage (III + IV, = 0.041). In addition, increased parkin expression was observed in the invasive front tumor region ( = 0.013). More importantly, a positive correlation was found between parkin expression and the overall survival of patients with advanced colorectal cancer ( = 0.019). Multivariate analysis showed that parkin expression was independent of any of the clinicopathological parameters evaluated in relation to patient survival.

Conclusions: These results suggest that parkin expression status can be used as a potential independent prognostic marker of survival in advanced colorectal cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.20892/j.issn.2095-3941.2017.0136DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5842336PMC
February 2018

Genetic data for 26 autosomal STR markers from Brazilian population.

Int J Legal Med 2018 Sep 19;132(5):1305-1307. Epub 2018 Jan 19.

Graduate Program in Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná (PUCPR), Rua Imaculada Conceição, 1155, Curitiba, PR, 80215-981, Brazil.

The allelic frequency distributions and statistical forensic parameters of 26 mini short tandem repeat (mini-STR) loci in a sample of 1575 unrelated individuals from five different Brazilian regions were obtained. All the analyzed loci showed great diversity and were highly informative. The results were compared with those of the US Caucasian, African American, and Hispanic population studies. This study aimed to contribute to forensic analysis for human identification and inference of the evidential value in familial bond tests.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00414-018-1777-9DOI Listing
September 2018

Familiar Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in a Large Brazilian Family Is Not Associated with Succinate Dehydrogenase Defects.

Eur Thyroid J 2016 Jul 10;5(2):94-9. Epub 2016 Mar 10.

Group for Advanced Molecular Investigation (NIMA), Graduate Program in Health Sciences (PPGCS), School of Medicine (EM), Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná (PUCPR), Curitiba, Brazil; Section on Endocrinology and Genetics, Program on Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics (PDEGEN) and Pediatric Endocrinology Inter-Institute Training Program, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Md., USA.

Background: Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine gland malignancy. Advances in understanding the genetic basis for thyroid cancer revealed the potential involvement of several genes in the formation of thyroid tumors. Mutations in the gene coding for succinate dehydrogenase subtype B (SDHB) have been implicated in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a heterotetrameric protein composed of four subunits, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD, and participates in both the electron transport chain and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between variants in the SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD genes and familiar PTC in a large Brazilian family.

Method: Four patients with PTC, 1 patient with PTC and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), 1 patient with GIST, and their relatives - several of them with different thyroid problems - from a large Brazilian family were screened for genetic variations of SDHx genes with the use of polymerase chain reaction-single-stranded conformational polymorphism and direct sequencing.

Results: Only one rare variation in SDHA was found in some of the family members, but not segregating with the disease. No other genetic variants of these genes were detected in the family members that presented with PTC and/or GIST.

Conclusion: Familiar PTC and a GIST were not associated with SDHx mutations; additional genetic defects, yet unknown, may be responsible for the development of tumor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000444522DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4949364PMC
July 2016

Association of a PARK2 Germline Variant and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in a Southern Brazilian Population.

Oncology 2016 10;91(2):101-5. Epub 2016 Jun 10.

Graduate Program in Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Pontifx00ED;cia Universidade Catx00F3;lica do Paranx00E1; (PUCPR), Curitiba, Brazil.

Ovarian cancer (OC) is the eighth most common cancer among women in Brazil and seventh in the world population. OC has a high mortality rate and is difficult to diagnose. Currently, OC detection most often occurs at an advanced stage of the disease due to its silent progression, which contributes to the high mortality rate. Available genetic markers are not considered specifically enough for an initial and definite diagnosis. The association with new genes involved with OC can provide a better understanding of this pathology as well as contribute to the development of a marker scenario, providing an improvement in the treatment and survival of patients. The aim of this study was to examine the potential association between the PARK2 gene and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Accordingly, we conducted a study for which 25 patients and 87 controls were recruited. Linkage disequilibrium analysis showed that the four studied tag SNPs (rs2803073, rs6930532, rs1040079, and rs2276201) were independent. Our results using the multivariate analysis between the additive and dominant model demonstrated that tag SNP rs2803073 of PARK2 is associated with susceptibility to EOC (p = 0.018, OR = 0.42). These findings suggest that hereditary variation in the PARK2 gene could influence EOC development mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000446657DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4982793PMC
January 2017

Analysis of polymorphisms in the lactotransferrin gene promoter and dental caries.

Int J Dent 2011 8;2011:571726. Epub 2011 Dec 8.

Center for Health and Biological Sciences, Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná (PUCPR), Imaculada Conceição Street 1155, 80215-901 Curitiba, PR, Brazil.

Regarding host aspects, there has been strong evidence for a genetic component in the etiology of caries. The salivary protein lactotransferrin (LTF) exhibits antibacterial activity, but there is no study investigating the association of polymorphisms in the promoter region of LTF gene with caries. The objective of this study was firstly to search the promoter region of the human LTF gene for variations and, if existent, to investigate the association of the identified polymorphisms with dental caries in 12-year-old students. From 687 unrelated, 12-year-old, both sex students, 50 individuals were selected and divided into two groups of extreme phenotypes according to caries experience: 25 students without (DMFT = 0) and 25 with caries experience (DMFT ≥ 4). The selection of individuals with extreme phenotypes augments the chances to find gene variations which could be associated with such phenotypes. LTF gene-putative promoter region (+39 to -1143) of the selected 50 individuals was analyzed by high-resolution melting technique. Fifteen students, 8 without (DMFT = 0) and 7 with caries experience (mean DMFT = 6.28), presented deviations of the pattern curve suggestive of gene variations and were sequenced. However, no polymorphisms were identified in the putative promoter region of the LTF gene.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/571726DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3235467PMC
August 2012

Mosaic partial trisomy 19p12-q13.11 due to a small supernumerary marker chromosome: a locus associated with Asperger syndrome?

Am J Med Genet A 2011 Sep 3;155A(9):2308-10. Epub 2011 Aug 3.

Graduate Program in Health Sciences (PPGCS), Center for Biological and Health Sciences (CCBS), Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Parana (PUCPR) Curitiba, PR, Brazil.

In the neurodevelopmentally impaired population the frequency of small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) is about 0.3%. To find the origin of a sSMC in a 4-year-old boy with Asperger syndrome (AS) a microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), using a 135K-feature whole-genome microarray, and Metaphase FISH analysis, was performed. The sSMC was characterized as being composed of 18.4 Mb from 19p12q13.11. Based on the size and genic content, it is expected that the partial trisomy detected is responsible for the characteristics observed in the patient. In that case it could be an indication of a novel locus associated with AS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.34196DOI Listing
September 2011

Somatic/gonadal mosaicism in a syndromic form of ectrodactyly, including eye abnormalities, documented through array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

Am J Med Genet A 2011 May 11;155A(5):1152-6. Epub 2011 Apr 11.

Group for Advanced Molecular Investigation, Graduate Program in Health Sciences, Center for Biological and Health Sciences, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Parana, Curitiba, PR, Brazil.

Split hand/foot malformation (SHFM) is characterized by underdeveloped or absent central digital rays, clefts of hands and feet, and variable syndactyly of the remaining digits. SHFM is a heterogeneous condition caused by abnormalities at one of multiple loci, including SHFM1 (SHFM1 at 7q21-q22), SHFM2 (Xq26), SHFM3 (FBXW4/DACTYLIN at 10q24), SHFM4 (TP63 at 3q27), and SHFM5 (DLX1 and DLX 2 at 2q31). SHFM3 is unique in that it is caused by submicroscopic tandem chromosome duplications of FBXW4/DACTYLIN. In order to show that array-based comparative genomic hybridization should be considered an essential aspect of the genetic analysis of patients with SHFM, we report on a family with two brothers who have ectrodactyly. Interestingly, both also have ocular abnormalities. Their sister and both parents are healthy. DNA of all five family members was analyzed using oligonucleotide-based DNA microarray and quantitative PCR. The two affected brothers were found to have a small duplication of approximately 539 kb at 10q24.32. The patients' sister and father do not have the microduplication, but qPCR showed that mother's DNA carries the duplication in 20% of blood lymphocytes. In this family, two children were affected with ectrodactyly having a duplication over the SHFM3 locus. The mother, who shows no clinical features of ectrodacytyly, is a mosaic for the same duplication. Therefore, we demonstrate that somatic/gonadal mosaicism is a mechanism that gives rise to SHFM. We also suggest that ocular abnormalities may be part of the clinical description of SHFM3.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.33942DOI Listing
May 2011

What can be done when asymptomatic patients discover they have Brugada syndrome? A case report of Brugada syndrome.

Int J Cardiol 2011 Aug 8;150(3):e96-7. Epub 2010 Apr 8.

Brugada syndrome is an inherited cardiac disorder associated with a specific electrocardiographic pattern, involving ST segment elevation in leads V1 to V3. When not spontaneously terminated, it can lead to ventricular fibrillation and sudden death. We present a case report of a young male whose brother suffered a sudden cardiac arrest while playing soccer. A novel mutation c.2678G>A was detected on the gene SCN5A through molecular diagnosis. The mutation was shown to be present in the individual, his daughter and his other brother. For patients with previous ventricular fibrillation and/or syncope, implantable cardiac device (ICD) is recommended. However, how can patients without symptoms but with a clear diagnosis prevent cardiac arrest?
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2010.02.037DOI Listing
August 2011

Interleukin-6 plasmatic levels in patients with head trauma and intracerebral hemorrhage.

Asian J Neurosurg 2010 Jan;5(1):68-77

Center for Health and Biological Sciences, Pontificia Universidade Católica do Paraná (PUCPR).

The exact role of inflammatory response in hemorrhagic contusions is not fully characterized. The present study quantified IL-6 plasmatic levels in patients with closed head trauma and hemorrhagic contusions during the first 6 to 12 hours postrauma. The association between the plasmatic IL-6 levels, severity of trauma according to the Glasgow Coma Scale, volume of intracerebral hemorrhage and patient's clinical evolution were investigated. Although inflammation is a multifactorial process, a strong correlation between IL-6 levels, volume of traumatic hemorrhage and in-hospital evolution could be observed. A correlation between the IL-6 levels quantified 6 hours postrauma and progression of lesion volume between admission and 12 hours postrauma is suggested. The present study reinforces the importance of IL-6 in influencing the clinical conditions of a patient with cerebral injuries, particularly hemorrhagic contusions.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3198669PMC
January 2010

Association between vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to chronic kidney disease and periodontitis.

Blood Purif 2007 3;25(5-6):411-9. Epub 2007 Oct 3.

Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil.

Background/aims: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and periodontitis (PD) are serious public-health concerns. Vitamin D is a fat-soluble steroid hormone that interacts with its nuclear receptor (VDR) to regulate a variety of biological processes, such as bone metabolism, immune response modulation and transcription of several genes involved in CKD and PD disease mechanisms. The aim of this work was to investigate the association between polymorphisms in the VDR gene and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and PD.

Methods: 222 subjects with and without ESRD (in hemodialysis) were divided into groups with and without PD. Polymorphisms TaqI and BsmI in the VDR gene were analyzed by PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism. The significance of differences in allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies between groups was assessed by the chi2 test (p value <0.05) and odds ratio (OR).

Results: Allele G was associated with protection against ESRD: groups without versus with ESRD (GG) x (GA+AA): OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.4-4.6, p = 0.00; (G x A): OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.0-2.3, p = 0.02; (TG + CG) x (TA + CA): OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.0-2.3, p = 0.02. No association was observed between the study polymorphisms and susceptibility to or protection against PD.

Conclusion: Allele G of the VDR BsmI polymorphism was associated with protection against ESRD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000109235DOI Listing
March 2008