Publications by authors named "Vanessa Karine Schneider"

5 Publications

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Physiological, nutritional, and molecular responses of Brazilian sugarcane cultivars under stress by aluminum.

PeerJ 2021 28;9:e11461. Epub 2021 Jun 28.

Department of Genetics and Evolution, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, Brazil.

Background: Sugarcane is a crop of global importance and has been expanding to areas with soils containing high levels of exchangeable aluminum (Al), which is a limiting factor for crop development in acidic soils. The study of the sugarcane physiological and nutritional behavior together with patterns of gene expression in response to Al stress may provide a basis for effective strategies to increase crop productivity in acidic soils.

Methods: Sugarcane cultivars were evaluated for physiological parameters (photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and transpiration), nutrient (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, and S) and Al contents in leaves and roots and gene expression, of the genes , by qPCR, both related to the production of organic acids, and , related to oxidative stress.

Results: Brazilian sugarcane RB867515, RB928064, and RB935744 cultivars exhibited very different responses to induced stress by Al. Exposure to Al caused up-regulation ( and ) or down-regulation (, , and ), depending on the cultivar, Al level, and plant tissue. The RB867515 cultivar was the most Al-tolerant, showing no decline of nutrient content in plant tissue, photosynthesis, transpiration, and stomatal conductance after exposure to Al; it exhibited the highest Al content in the roots, and showed important and gene expression in the roots. RB928064 only showed low expression of in roots and leaves, while RB935744 showed important expression of the gene only in the leaves. Sugarcane cultivars were classified in the following descending Al-tolerance order: RB867515 > RB928064 = RB935744. These results may contribute to the obtention of Al-tolerant cultivars that can play their genetic potential in soils of low fertility and with low demand for agricultural inputs; the selection of potential plants for breeding programs; the elucidation of Al detoxification mechanisms employed by sugarcane cultivars.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.11461DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8247702PMC
June 2021

Recombinant expression, characterization and phylogenetic studies of novels cystatins-like proteins of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) and clementine (Citrus clementina).

Int J Biol Macromol 2020 Jun 25;152:546-553. Epub 2020 Feb 25.

Departamento de Genética e Evolução, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address:

Phytocystatins are plant cystatins that are related to several physiological processes regulating endogenous cysteine proteases involved in seed development and germination, programmed cell death and response to stress conditions. In addition, phytocystatins can act in plant defense against exogenous peptidases from herbivorous insects, pathogens and nematodes. Considering that Citrus fruits are important to human nutrition and represent a high value crop in worldwide agriculture, in the present work, we performed the identification of putative cystatins from Citrus sinensis and from Citrus clementine and submitted them to phylogenetic analysis. Six cystatins from each species were identified as orthologous and classified into three well supported phylogenetic groups. Five cystatins representative of the phylogenetic groups were recombinantly expressed and the in vitro studies revealed them to be potent inhibitors against the cysteine peptidases papain, legumain, human cathepsins (B, L, S, K) and a cathepsin B-like from Diaphorina citri (the Asian Citrus psyllid). Our findings provide the C. clementina and C. sinensis cystatins classification and an enzyme-inhibitor interactions profile, which may reflect an evolutionary process of Citrus cystatins related to gene functions as initial germination rates and seedlings development as well associated to plant defense against pathogens, as insects and nematodes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2020.02.280DOI Listing
June 2020

In vivo and in vitro anti-inflammatory and pro-osteogenic effects of citrus cystatin CsinCPI-2.

Cytokine 2019 11 18;123:154760. Epub 2019 Jun 18.

Department of Diagnosis and Surgery, School of Dentistry at Araraquara, Sao Paulo State University - UNESP, Araraquara, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address:

Cystatins are natural inhibitors of cysteine peptidases. Recently, cystatins derived from plants, named phytocystatins, have been extensively studied. Among them, CsinCPI-2 proteins from Citrus sinensis were identified and recombinantly produced by our group. Thus, this study described the recombinant expression, purification, and inhibitory activity of this new phytocystatin against human cathepsins K and B and assessed the anti-inflammatory effect of CsinCPI-2 in vitro in mouse and in vivo in rats. In addition, the pro-osteogenic effect of CsinCPI-2 was investigated in vitro. The inflammatory response of mouse macrophage cells stimulated with P. gingivalis was modulated by CsinCPI-2. The in vitro results showed an inhibitory effect (p < 0.05) on cathepsin K, cathepsin B, IL-1β, and TNF-α gene expression. In addition, CsinCPI-2 significantly inhibited in vivo the activity of TNF-α (p < 0.05) in the blood of rats, previously stimulated by E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). CsinCPI-2 had a pro-osteogenic effect in human dental pulp cells, demonstrated by the increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, deposition of mineralized nodules, and the gene expression of the osteogenic markers as bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx-2), ALP, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein (BSP). These preliminary studies suggested that CsinCPI-2 has a potential anti-inflammatory, and at the same time, a pro-osteogenic effect. This may lead to new therapies for the control of diseases where inflammation plays a key role, such as periodontal disease and apical periodontitis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cyto.2019.154760DOI Listing
November 2019

Transgenic sugarcane overexpressing CaneCPI-1 negatively affects the growth and development of the sugarcane weevil Sphenophorus levis.

Plant Cell Rep 2017 Jan 11;36(1):193-201. Epub 2016 Nov 11.

Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Department of Genetics and Evolution, Federal University of São Carlos, Rodovia Washigton Luis, Km 235, São Carlos, SP, 13565-905, Brazil.

Key Message: Transgenic sugarcane expressing CaneCPI-1 exhibits resistance to Sphenophorus levis larvae. Transgenic plants have widely been used to improve resistance against insect attack. Sugarcane is an economically important crop; however, great losses are caused by insect attack. Sphenophorus levis is a sugarcane weevil that digs tunnels in the stem base, leading to the destruction of the crop. This insect is controlled inefficiently by chemical insecticides. Transgenic plants expressing peptidase inhibitors represent an important strategy for impairing insect growth and development. Knowledge of the major peptidase group present in the insect gut is critical when choosing the most effective inhibitor. S. levis larvae use cysteine peptidases as their major digestive enzymes, primarily cathepsin L-like activity. In this study, we developed transgenic sugarcane plants that overexpress sugarcane cysteine peptidase inhibitor 1 (CaneCPI-1) and assessed their potential through feeding bioassays with S. levis larvae. Cystatin overexpression in the transgenic plants was evaluated using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, RT-qPCR, and immunoblot assays. A 50% reduction of the average weight was observed in larvae that fed on transgenic plants in comparison to larvae that fed on non-transgenic plants. In addition, transgenic sugarcane exhibited less damage caused by larval attack than the controls. Our results suggest that the overexpression of CaneCPI-1 in sugarcane is a promising strategy for improving resistance against this insect.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00299-016-2071-2DOI Listing
January 2017

Characterization of a Recombinant Cathepsin B-Like Cysteine Peptidase from Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae): A Putative Target for Control of Citrus Huanglongbing.

PLoS One 2015 30;10(12):e0145132. Epub 2015 Dec 30.

Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Department of Genetics and Evolution, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, Brazil.

Huanglonbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive disease affecting citrus plants. The causal agent is associated with the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) and the psyllid Diaphorina citri, vector of disease, that transmits the bacterium associated with HLB. The control of disease can be achieved by suppressing either the bacterium or the vector. Among the control strategies for HLB disease, one of the widely used consists in controlling the enzymes of the disease vector, Diaphorina citri. The insect Diaphorina citri belongs to the order Hemiptera, which frequently have cysteine peptidases in the gut. The importance of this class of enzymes led us to search for enzymes in the D. citri transcriptome for the establishment of alternatives strategies for HLB control. In this study, we reported the identification and characterization of a cathepsin B-like cysteine peptidase from D. citri (DCcathB). DCcathB was recombinantly expressed in Pichia pastoris, presenting a molecular mass of approximately 50 kDa. The enzyme hydrolyzed the fluorogenic substrate Z-F-R-AMC (Km = 23.5 μM) and the selective substrate for cathepsin B, Z-R-R-AMC (Km = 6.13 μM). The recombinant enzyme was inhibited by the cysteine protease inhibitors E64 (IC50 = 0.014 μM) and CaneCPI-4 (Ki = 0.05 nM) and by the selective cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074 (IC50 = 0.095 nM). RT-qPCR analysis revealed that the expression of the DCcathB in nymph and adult was approximately 9-fold greater than in egg. Moreover, the expression of this enzyme in the gut was 175-fold and 3333-fold higher than in the remaining tissues and in the head, respectively, suggesting that DCcathB can be a target for HLB control.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0145132PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4696824PMC
June 2016
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