Publications by authors named "Valerio Cellini"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Combined One-Staged Robot-Assisted Sacral Chordoma Resection.

World Neurosurg 2020 09 15;141:210-214. Epub 2020 Jun 15.

Department of Surgical and Biomedical Sciences, Urology Clinic Perugia-Terni, University of Perugia, Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital Piazzale Menghini, Perugia, Italy.

Background: The robotic surgery is an advanced modern minimally invasive technology, widely used in urologic oncology, and it has become useful in particular conditions. Over time, different surgical specialties made use of the robotic properties to minimize complications for high-risk procedures. A combined 1-staged robot-assisted multidisciplinary surgery with intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring can be a safe procedure to remove a sacral chordoma with low morbidity rates.

Case Description: A 64-year-old woman complained of a few months of drug-resistant low back and abdominal pain. The subsequent development of constipation brought the patient to undergo an abdominal computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging. Radiologic investigations revealed a large size sacral mass associated with a partial destruction of the sacrum and posterior compression of the rectum. The tumor was en bloc removed by a combined 1-staged anterior laparoscopic robot-assisted and posterior open lumbosacral approach with continue intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring of sacral and pudendal plexuses. The histological diagnosis was of chordoma. After surgery, the patient reported pain relief and the total recovery of bowel dysfunction with good 11-month follow-up outcome.

Conclusions: This combined technique represents a promising treatment option in selected cases. The robotic technology combined with the experience of highly qualified staff can improve the surgical result by minimizing complications. However, longer follow-up is necessary to confirm the long-term effects in terms of recurrence and survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2020.06.056DOI Listing
September 2020

Ovarian toxicity: from environmental exposure to chemotherapy.

Curr Pharm Des 2014 ;20(34):5388-97

University of L'Aquila, Dept. of Life, Health, and Environmental Sciences, Via Vetoio, 67100 L'Aquila, Italy.

Unlike men, who have continuous spermatogenesis throughout most of their lifetime, women are born with a fixed supply of follicles, and this number progressively declines with age until the menopause. Beside age, the speed of follicle depletion can be regulated by genetic, hormonal and environmental influences. In the course of their lives, women are exposed to multiple chemicals and radiation sources that can increase the chance of developing permanent infertility and premature ovarian failure (POF). A wealth of experimental data indicate that iatrogenic (chemotherapy, radiotherapy) and xenobiotic agents (e.g., chemicals, pharmaceuticals) are potent ovotoxicants capable of accelerating ovarian reserve depletion. In the present review we reported the negative effects exerted on mammalian ovary by some widely diffused environmental chemicals, as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dithiocarbamate mancozeb, and by 1-3 butadiene and 4-vinylcycloexene, two occupational chemicals known to be capable of inducing ovarian cancer and infertility. Furthermore, attention has been devoted to the consequences of chemo- and radiotherapy on the ovary, both known to affect reproductive lifespan. Our increasing understanding of metabolic alterations induced by these agents is fundamental to individuate new therapeutic strategies aimed to prevent ovarian dysfunction in fertile women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1381612820666140205145319DOI Listing
June 2015

Post-ovulatory ageing of mouse oocytes affects the distribution of specific spindle-associated proteins and Akt expression levels.

Reprod Fertil Dev 2014 ;26(4):562-9

Department of Anatomy, Histology, Forensic Medicine and Orthopedics, Section of Histology and Embryology, School of Pharmacy and Medicine, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, V.le Regina Elena 324, 00161 Rome, Italy.

The aim of this study has been to determine the effects of in vivo post-ovulatory ageing (POA) on the distribution of spindle-associated proteins, histone H3/H4 post-translational modifications and on v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (Akt) expression levels. To this end, oocytes were retrieved 13, 29 and 33h after human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) treatment. The presence and distribution at the meiotic spindle of acetylated tubulin, γ-tubulin, polo kinase-1 and Ser473/Thr308 phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) as well as histone H3 and H4 acetylation and phosphorylation levels were assayed via immunofluorescence. Akt expression levels were determined via reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting analyses. Spindles from oocytes recovered 13h and 29h after hCG treatment showed similar levels of acetylated tubulin but ageing induced: (1) translocation of γ-tubulin from spindle poles to microtubules, (2) absence of Thr308- and Ser473-pAkt in 76% and 30% of oocytes, respectively, and (3) a significant reduction in phosphorylation levels of serine 10 on histone 3. At 29h, a significant decrease in Akt mRNA, but not in pAkt or Akt protein levels, was recorded. By contrast, protein content significantly decreased 33h after hCG. We conclude that POA impairs oocyte viability and fertilisability by altering the expression levels and spindle distribution of proteins that are implicated in cell survival and chromosome segregation. Together, these events could play a role in oocyte apoptosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/RD13010DOI Listing
December 2014

The role of Akt signalling in the mammalian ovary.

Int J Dev Biol 2012 ;56(10-12):809-17

Department of Health Sciences, University of L'Aquila, Italy.

The serine/threonine protein kinase Akt is involved in many cellular processes including cell growth, survival, proliferation and metabolism. Akt activity is modulated downstream of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) in response to different extracellular stimuli. In the mammalian ovary, Akt collaborates with other kinases in the regulation of coordinate follicle and oocyte development. Akt determines the pool of primordial follicles and the transition from quiescent to growing phase. In addition, the kinase modulates granulosa cell apoptosis throughout folliculogenesis. In oocytes Akt participates in the control of meiosis resumption and, at metaphase II stage, regulates polar body emission and spindle organization. Its inhibition negatively affects preimplantation embryo development. As a consequence of such a central role, Akt dysregulation is associated with several human diseases including infertility and ovarian cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1387/ijdb.120146scDOI Listing
August 2013

The fungicide mancozeb induces toxic effects on mammalian granulosa cells.

Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 2012 Apr 17;260(2):155-61. Epub 2012 Feb 17.

Department of Health Sciences, University of L'Aquila, Via Vetoio, L'Aquila, Italy.

The ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate mancozeb is a widely used fungicide with low reported toxicity in mammals. In mice, mancozeb induces embryo apoptosis, affects oocyte meiotic spindle morphology and impairs fertilization rate even when used at very low concentrations. We evaluated the toxic effects of mancozeb on the mouse and human ovarian somatic granulosa cells. We examined parameters such as cell morphology, induction of apoptosis, and p53 expression levels. Mouse granulosa cells exposed to mancozeb underwent a time- and dose-dependent modification of their morphology, and acquired the ability to migrate but not to proliferate. The expression level of p53, in terms of mRNA and protein content, decreased significantly in comparison with unexposed cells, but no change in apoptosis was recorded. Toxic effects could be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of ethylenthiourea (ETU), the main mancozeb catabolite, which was found in culture medium. Human granulosa cells also showed dose-dependent morphological changes and reduced p53 expression levels after exposure to mancozeb. Altogether, these results indicate that mancozeb affects the somatic cells of the mammalian ovarian follicles by inducing a premalignant-like status, and that such damage occurs to the same extent in both mouse and human GC. These results further substantiate the concept that mancozeb should be regarded as a reproductive toxicant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.taap.2012.02.005DOI Listing
April 2012

Effects of trifluralin on the mouse ovary.

Environ Toxicol 2013 Apr 4;28(4):201-6. Epub 2011 May 4.

Dipartimento di Scienze della Salute, Università degli Studi dell'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy.

Trifluralin, a herbicide used to protect many arable and horticultural crops, was evaluated for its potential toxicity on the mammalian ovary. To this end, adult female mice were fed or not (control) with a trifluralin-enriched diet (150 mg/kg body weight/day) during gestation and lactation. After weaning, 3-week-old female mice from either trifluralin-treated or control groups were used to evaluate whether the exposure to this herbicide in utero and during lactation could induce stress responses in the ovary. It was found that trifluralin exposure caused a significantly higher level of p53, but not of pRb, in the whole ovary, and in particular in granulosa cells. TUNEL staining showed that herbicide treatment did not increase the apoptotic index of the somatic compartment. Also oocyte fertilizability was unaffected, as metaphase II oocytes retrieved from treated mice were capable of forming male and female pronuclei after in vitro fertilization as control mice. However, trifluralin determined a slightly higher number of oocytes with cytoplasmic degeneration compared with control animals. In conclusion, our results suggest that exposure to a low trifluralin dose during pregnancy and lactation does not impair oocyte quality, but can induce a stress response in ovarian somatic cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/tox.20711DOI Listing
April 2013