Dr Valentina Lanteri, DDS, MS, PhD - University of Milano Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, Unit of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry  School of Dentistry - Post Doc Researcher

Dr Valentina Lanteri

DDS, MS, PhD

University of Milano Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, Unit of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry School of Dentistry

Post Doc Researcher

Milano | Italy

Main Specialties: Dentistry

Additional Specialties: Orthodontics, Paediatric Dentistry

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-2191-8673

Dr Valentina Lanteri, DDS, MS, PhD - University of Milano Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, Unit of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry  School of Dentistry - Post Doc Researcher

Dr Valentina Lanteri

DDS, MS, PhD

Introduction

Dr. Valentina Lanteri is a Post Doc Researcher at the Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences and she attends the School of Specialization in Pediatric Dentistry of the University of Milan. She holds a PhD in Oral Sciences from the University of Milan (2017). She has also earned a Master in Pediatric Dentistry at the University of Florence in 2008, a Master in Pediatric Dentistry and Interceptive Orthodontics at the University of Pisa in 2009, as well as a Graduation Degree in Dentistry and Dental Prosthesis in 2002 and a Specialization in Orthodontics in 2005, both with honors, at the University of Pavia.
In the academic field she was first Teaching Assistant of Malocclusions and TMJ Dysfunctions of the University of Magna Graecia and later Adjunct Professor of Oral Hygiene integrated to the Oral Sciences at the Degree Course in Dental Hygiene at the University of Pavia from 2005 to 2013. She is an active member of the Italian Society of Orthodontics (SIDO). She has given numerous courses and conference presentations and is the author or co-author of several scientific publications on orthodontics.

Primary Affiliation: University of Milano Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, Unit of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry School of Dentistry - Milano , Italy

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Publications

18Publications

121Reads

40Profile Views

Relationship between molar deciduous teeth infraocclusion and mandibular growth: A case-control study.

Eur J Paediatr Dent 2020 Mar;21(1):39-45

Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, University of Milan, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23804/ejpd.2020.21.01.08DOI Listing
March 2020
0.484 Impact Factor

Assessment of the Stability of the Palatal Rugae in a 3D-3D Superimposition Technique Following Slow Maxillary Expansion (SME).

Sci Rep 2020 Feb 14;10(1):2676. Epub 2020 Feb 14.

Department of Biomedical Surgical and Dental Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.

The Palatal Rugae are considered a useful human identification marker for both orthodontists and forensic personnel. The principal aim of the present study was to evaluate the stability of palatal rugae with a 3D-3D superimposition procedure following Slow Maxillary Expansion (SME), in order to assess whether they kept their uniqueness and validity for human identification, even after a specific dental treatment. For this purpose, a sample of 27 digital dental models - belonging to growing patients (13 males and 14 females), aged between 8.5 and 15 years, who underwent SME therapy - was retrospectively studied and compared with a control group of 27 untreated subjects - (13 males and 14 females). Digital dental models were obtained pre-treatment and at device removal; both were processed by means of an intraoral scanner. A superimposition procedure was thus performed to reach the minimum point-to-point distance between two models of palatal rugae. Intra- and inter-observer differences were statistically analyzed by paired Wilcoxon test and Intra-class Correlation coefficient (ICC), showing values larger than 0.93. There was no difference in Root-Mean-Square (RMS) values between untreated control subjects and subjects treated with Leaf Expander (p?=?0.062). A RMS value of 0.43 was the threshold to distinguish the pooled group ("Untreated" and "Leaf") from any mismatch. According to the obtained results, this study failed to reject the null hypothesis and presented no differences between the RMS values of the Test group and the RMS values of the untreated control group. This work highlighted the usefulness of 3D superimposition procedure for purposes of human identification, in subjects undergoing dental treatment. However, keeping in sight the forensic use of this technique as a helpful probation element in court, further studies should be performed to confirm these findings.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-59637-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7021754PMC
February 2020
5.078 Impact Factor

Biomimetic Effect of Nano-Hydroxyapatite in Demineralized Enamel before Orthodontic Bonding of Brackets and Attachments: Visual, Adhesion Strength, and Hardness in In Vitro Tests.

Biomed Res Int 2020 30;2020:6747498. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

Unit of Dental Hygiene, Section of Dentistry, Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/6747498DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7013302PMC
January 2020

A multicenter, prospective, randomized trial of pain and discomfort during maxillary expansion: Leaf expander versus hyrax expander.

Int J Paediatr Dent 2020 Jan 1. Epub 2020 Jan 1.

Department of Biomedical Surgical and Dental Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ipd.12612DOI Listing
January 2020
1.540 Impact Factor

Evolution of the Leaf Expander: A Maxillary Self Expander.

J Clin Orthod 2019;53(5):260-266

Private practice of orthodontics, Bra, Italy.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2019
3 Reads
0.410 Impact Factor

Lymphangioma of the tongue associated with open bite: case report.

Eur J Paediatr Dent 2019 Dec;20(4):311-314

Fondazione IRCCS Ca'Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan - University of Milan, Milan, Italy.

Background: Lymphangioma of the tongue is a rare condition related to congenital malformations of the lymphatic system. It may have different implications such as macroglossia. This condition could exacerbate in aesthetic abnormalities and functional problems such as maxillofacial structural deformities, dysphagia, airway obstruction and speech difficulties. The aim of this paper is to describe this disease by means of a case report.

Case Report: A 4-year-old patient was referred to our department presenting macroglossia, functional difficulty during swallowing and mastication, speech disturbances, airway obstruction, and deformities of the maxillofacial structures. Diagnosis of lymphangioma was confirmed by biopsy. After surgical removal of the lesion, the patient was treated with rapid palatal expansion, functional appliance with lingual grid and fixed multibracket appliance. After treatment, improvement in function, indicated by the gradual increase in occlusal force, could be taken as a positive sign of stability.

Conclusion: The 3-step treatment protocol described in this article proves to be effective in controlling the malocclusion in the three planes of the space in a patient affected by lymphangioma of the tongue.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23804/ejpd.2019.20.04.10DOI Listing
December 2019
0.893 Impact Factor

Correlation between Dental Vestibular-Palatal Inclination and Alveolar Bone Remodeling after Orthodontic Treatment: A CBCT Analysis.

Materials (Basel) 2019 Dec 16;12(24). Epub 2019 Dec 16.

Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Milan, 20100 Milan, Italy.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ma12244225DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6947223PMC
December 2019
2.651 Impact Factor

Comparison of a tridimensional cephalometric analysis performed on 3T-MRI compared with CBCT: a pilot study in adults.

Prog Orthod 2019 Oct 21;20(1):40. Epub 2019 Oct 21.

Department of Orthodontics, UOC Maxillofacial and Dental Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, 20142, Milan, Italy.

Objective: Since the introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in dentistry, this technology has enabled distortion-free three-dimensional cephalometric analysis for orthodontic and orthognathic surgery diagnosis. However, CBCT is associated with significantly higher radiation exposure than traditional routine bidimensional examinations for orthodontic diagnosis, although low-dose protocols have markedly reduced radiation exposure over time. The objective of this preliminary feasibility study is to compare the accuracy and diagnostic capabilities of an already-validated three-dimensional cephalometric analysis on CBCT to those of an analysis on 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (3T-MRI) to assess whether the latter can deliver a comparable quality of information while avoiding radiation exposure.

Materials And Methods: In order to test the feasibility of three-dimensional cephalometry on 3T-MRI, 18 subjects (4 male; 14 female) with mean age 37.8?±?SD 10.2, who had undergone both maxillofacial CBCT and maxillofacial 3T-MRI for various purposes within 1 month, were selected from the archive of the Department of Dentistry and Maxillofacial Surgery of Fondazione Ospedale Policlinico Maggiore, IRCCS, Milano, Italy. A three-dimensional cephalometric analysis composed of ten midsagittal and four bilateral landmarks and 24 measurements (11 angular, 13 linear) was performed on both scans using Mimics Research® v. 17.0 (NV, Technologielaan 15, 3001 Leuven, Belgium). Cephalometric analysis was performed twice by two independent orthodontists for each scan, and each orthodontist repeated the measurements 3 weeks later. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS® 20.00 for Windows (IBM® Corporation, Sommers, NY, USA). A Bland-Altman test for each cephalometric value was performed to assess the agreement between the procedures. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess interobserver and intraobserver reliability. The coefficient of variation was used to evaluate precision.

Results: Both procedures showed good reliability, with mean intraobserver ICCs of 0.977/0.971 for CBCT and 0.881/0.912 for MRI. The average interobserver ICCs were 0.965 for CBCT and 0.833 for MRI. A Bland-Altman analysis for the cephalometric tracing revealed a similar range of agreement between the two modalities; the bias range (mean?±?SD) was -?0.25-0.66?mm (0.174?±?0.31) for distances and -?0.41-0.54° (0.12?±?0.33) for angles.

Conclusions: Within the main limitation of this pilot study, that is, the small sample, it is possible to state that cephalometric measurements on 3T-MRI seem to possess adequate reliability and repeatability and that they show satisfying agreement with values measured on CBCTs. An MRI examination does not expose patients to ionizing radiation and could provide an alternative to CBCT for three-dimensional cephalometrics in the future.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40510-019-0293-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6801285PMC
October 2019
1 Read
1.381 Impact Factor

Three-dimensional evaluation of rapid maxillary expansion anchored to primary molars: direct effects on maxillary arch and spontaneous mandibular response.

Eur J Paediatr Dent 2019 Mar;20(1):38-42

Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, University of Milan, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23804/ejpd.2019.20.01.08DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads
0.484 Impact Factor

Efficacy of ketoprofen lysine salt and paracetamol/acetaminophen to reduce pain during rapid maxillary expansion: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

Int J Paediatr Dent 2019 Jan 9;29(1):58-65. Epub 2018 Oct 9.

Department of Biomedical Surgical and Dental Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/ipd.12428
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ipd.12428DOI Listing
January 2019
43 Reads
1.540 Impact Factor

Comparison between RME, SME and Leaf Expander in growing patients: a retrospective postero-anterior cephalometric study.

Eur J Paediatr Dent 2018 Sep;19(3):199-204

MD, DDS, MS, Full Professor and Dean, Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, University of Milan, Fondazione IRCCS Ca´ Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.

Aim: The aim of this study is to compare the dental and orthopaedic effects of the Leaf Expander with rapid and slow maxillary expanders.

Materials And Methods: The sample comprised 30 patients with a posterior crossbite divided into three groups: the rapid maxillary expander (RME) group (3 m, 7 f), average age 8.9 years; the slow maxillary expander (SME) group (7 m, 3 f) average age 12.2 years; the Leaf Expander (LE) group (7 m, 3 f), average age 7.9 years. Postero-anterior cephalometric studies have been obtained at the beginning of the therapy (T1) and after 9 months (T2). Nasal width, maxillary width, mandibular width, upper permanent molars width have been measured by a calibrated examiner.

Results: All the measurements increased significantly after the treatment (paired t-test P=0.05). Maxillary average width increased of 4.2 mm (SD 3.6 mm) in RME; + 2.8 mm (SD 2.8 mm) in RSE and +3.6 mm (SD 2.2 mm) in LE group. Upper permanent molars width increased: + 5.4 mm (SD 3.31 mm) in RME; + 5.4 mm (SD 3.3 mm) in SME and + 3.8 mm (SD 2.1 mm) in LE group. No statistical differencesbetween the groups have been found (t-student test P=.05).

Conclusions: The effectiveness of the LE in transversal deficiency correction has been confirmed.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://ejpd.eu/EJPD_2018_19_3_6.pdf
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.23804/ejpd.2018.19.03.6DOI Listing
September 2018
7 Reads
0.893 Impact Factor

Maxillary tridimensional changes after slow expansion with leaf expander in a sample of growing patients: a pilot study.

Eur J Paediatr Dent 2018 Mar;19(1):29-34

DDS, MS, Private practice Casale Monferrato (AL), Italy.

Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the dento-alveolar effects of slow maxillary expansion using the Leaf Expander in a sample of growing patients with maxillary transverse deficiency, unilateral cross bite and mandibular shift.

Materials And Methods: The study included 10 patients, 3 male and 7 female (mean age 7.5 + 7 months), treated with Leaf Expander anchored on the upper deciduous teeth. Digital models were obtained by a lab scan of the pvs impressions at the beginning of the therapy (T1) and at the removal of the palatal expander (T2). Five parameters were measured: 1) the distance between the first upper permanent molars; 2) the distance between the upper second deciduous molars; 3) the distance between the upper canine cusps 4) the distance between the first lower permanent molars; 5) the distance of the lower canine cusps.

Results: In all patients complete correction of posterior crossbite was achieved on average in 4 months, with a spontaneous expansion of the upper first permanent molars. Significant increases in the dento-alveolar transversal diameters were obtained. Increases were also observed in the anterior mandibular arch diameter (+ 1 mm).

Conclusions: These findings suggest that slow maxillary expansion using Leaf Expander appliance could be a reasonable alternative to conventional maxillary expansion therapy in the early mixed dentition.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23804/ejpd.2018.19.01.05DOI Listing
March 2018
1 Read
0.893 Impact Factor

Timing considerations on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after topical fluoride varnish applications.

J Orthod Sci 2017 Jan-Mar;6(1):11-15

Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2278-0203.197392DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5278579PMC
February 2017
13 Reads

The Leaf Expander for Non-Compliance Treatment in the Mixed Dentition.

J Clin Orthod 2016 Sep;50(9):552-560

Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, Orthodontics, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2016
2 Reads
0.410 Impact Factor

Effects of six different preventive treatments on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets: study.

Acta Biomater Odontol Scand 2015 Jan 14;1(1):13-17. Epub 2015 Apr 14.

Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, Unit of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of MilanMilanItaly.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/23337931.2015.10
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/23337931.2015.1021351DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5433176PMC
January 2015
2 Reads

Rapid and slow maxillary expansion: a posteroanterior cephalometric study.

Eur J Paediatr Dent 2014 Dec;15(4):415-8

Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, Unit of Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2014
8 Reads
0.484 Impact Factor

Top co-authors

Gianguido Cossellu
Gianguido Cossellu

University of Milan

6
Marco Farronato
Marco Farronato

University of Milan

5
Alessandro Ugolini
Alessandro Ugolini

University of Genoa

4
Cinzia Maspero
Cinzia Maspero

University of Milan

3
M Beretta
M Beretta

University of Ferrara

3
Andrea Butera
Andrea Butera

University of Pavia

3
Giampietro Farronato
Giampietro Farronato

University of Milan

3
Matteo Beretta
Matteo Beretta

Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz

2
Lorenzo Franchi
Lorenzo Franchi

University of Florence

2
Claudia Cherchi
Claudia Cherchi

University of Turin

2