Publications by authors named "Valérie Eschwege"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Impact of Geographic Region on the COMMANDER-HF Trial.

JACC Heart Fail 2021 Mar 3;9(3):201-211. Epub 2021 Feb 3.

Centre d'Investigations Cliniques Plurithématique, Université de Lorraine, Inserm 1433, Nancy, France, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU) de Nancy, Inserm U1116, Nancy, France, French Clinical Research Infrastructure Network Investigation Network Initiative - Cardiovascular and Renal Clinical Trialists, Nancy, France.

Objectives: This study sought to compare patient characteristics, outcomes, and treatment effects among regions in the COMMANDER-HF trial.

Background: Globalization of cardiovascular trials increases generalizability. However, regional differences may also introduce heterogeneity in results.

Methods: Incidence rates and interactions with treatment were recorded in pre-specified regions: Eastern Europe, Western Europe and South Africa, North America, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America.

Results: Most patients (n = 3,224; 64.2%) were from Eastern Europe; 458 (9.1%) were from Western Europe and South Africa; 149 (3.0%) were from North America; 733 (14.6%) were from Asia-Pacific; and 458 (9.1%) were from Latin America. Compared with patients from Eastern Europe, patients from Western Europe and South Africa, North America, and Asia-Pacific were older and more likely to have coronary interventions and cardiac devices. Patients from Eastern Europe had the lowest event rates. For the primary outcome of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, or all-cause death, event rates (100/year) were 11.6 in Eastern Europe (10.8 to 12.5); 19.5 (16.5 to 23.0) in Western Europe and South Africa; 14.2 (10.5 to 19.2) in North America; 17.7 (15.4 to 20.3) in Asia-Pacific; and 18.6 (15.6 to 22.1) in Latin America. There was a lower incidence of bleeding in Eastern Europe. Blood concentrations of rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Titusville, New Jersey) at 4 weeks were undetectable in 21% patients from Eastern Europe (n = 128) compared to 5% in other regions (n = 42). There was no evidence of treatment-by-region heterogeneity for the primary outcome (interaction = 0.14), but a favorable effect on the secondary outcome of MI, stroke, or cardiovascular death was observed in Western Europe and South Africa, North America, and Latin America but not in Eastern Europe and Asia-Pacific (interaction = 0.017).

Conclusions: In the COMMANDER-HF study, patients from Eastern Europe had a lower risk profile and fewer cardiovascular and bleeding events, possibly related to lower treatment adherence. Those differences might have influenced the effect of rivaroxaban therapy. (A Study to Assess the Effectiveness and Safety of Rivaroxaban in Reducing the Risk of Death, Myocardial Infarction or Stroke in Participants With Heart Failure and Coronary Artery Disease Following an Episode of Decompensated Heart Failure [COMMANDER HF]; NCT01877915).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jchf.2020.11.007DOI Listing
March 2021

Factor VIII and IX assays for post-infusion monitoring in hemophilia patients: Guidelines from the French BIMHO group (GFHT).

Eur J Haematol 2020 Aug 27;105(2):103-115. Epub 2020 May 27.

Service d'Hématologie Hémostase, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Bron, France.

Replacement therapy with plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII and FIX (pdFVIII/pdFIX or rFVIII/rFIX) concentrates is the standard of treatment in patients with haemophilia A and B, respectively. Measurement of factor VIII (FVIII:C) or factor IX (FIX:C) levels can be done by one-stage clotting assay (OSA) or chromogenic substrate assay (CSA). The French study group on the Biology of Hemorrhagic Diseases (a collaborative group of the GFHT and MHEMO network) presents a literature review and proposals for the monitoring of FVIII:C and FIX:C levels in treated haemophilia A and B patients, respectively. The use of CSA is recommended for the monitoring of patients treated with pdFVIII or rFVIII including extended half-life (EHL) rFVIII. Except for rFVIII-Fc, great caution is required when measuring FVIII:C levels by OSA in patients substituted by EHL-rFVIII. The OSA is recommended for the monitoring of patients treated with pdFIX or rFIX. Large discordances in the FIX:C levels measured for extended half-life rFIX (EHL-rFIX), depending on the method and reagents used, must lead to great attention when OSA is used for measuring FIX:C levels in patients substituted by EHL-rFIX. Data of most of recent studies, obtained with spiked plasmas, deserve to be confirmed in plasma samples of treated patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejh.13423DOI Listing
August 2020

Multicentre pharmacokinetic evaluation of rFVIII-Fc (efmoroctocog alfa) in a real life and comparison with non-extended half-life FVIII concentrates.

Haemophilia 2020 Mar 27;26(2):282-289. Epub 2020 Feb 27.

Laboratoire d'Hémostase Hémobiologie, CHU de Lille, Lille, France.

The use of enhanced half-life (EHL) FVIII has improved the quality of prophylaxis in haemophilia A, but with a benefit that may vary from one patient to another. We analysed the pharmacokinetic data obtained with efmoroctocog alfa (rFVIII-Fc) in 114 patients and, in 47 cases, compared them to those previously measured with non-EHL FVIII. The in vivo recovery (IVR) of rFVIII-Fc measured with one stage clotting assay (OSA) and chromogenic assay (CSA) was 2.2 and 2.8 IU/mL per IU/kg, respectively. The median half-life (T ) of rFVIII-Fc was 14.5 hours whatever the FVIII:C assay used, but variable and correlated with preinfusion VWF:Ag levels (r = .76). Both IVR and T were lower in patients under 12 years old (2.4 IU/mL per IU/kg and 11.1 hours, respectively; CSA). PK study of rFVIII-Fc vs non-EHL FVIII showed a T ratio of 1.4 in favour of rFVIII-Fc, regardless of the patient's age. However the relative increase in T with rFVIII-Fc was lower than 30% in one-third of patients evaluated, particularly when the previous FVIII administered was a BHK-derived product. This study therefore suggests that analysis of individual PK profile in response to a specific FVIII concentrate is potentially useful before a switch in haemophilia A patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hae.13946DOI Listing
March 2020

[Factor VIII assays in treated hemophilia A patients].

Ann Biol Clin (Paris) 2019 02;77(1):53-65

CHU Lille, Institut d'hématologie-transfusion, Inserm U1011, Lille, France.

Replacement therapy with plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII (pdFVIII or rFVIII) concentrates is the standard of treatment in patients with hemophilia A. The reference method used for measuring factor VIII (FVIII:C) levels in patients treated by FVIII concentrates is the chromogenic substrate assay (CSA). However, the one-stage clotting assay (OSA) is predominantly used in current clinical practice, but this method depends on the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) reagent and the coagulation analyzer used, and wide variations in the measurements of FVIII recovery have been reported with some factor concentrates. The French study group on the biology of hemorrhagic diseases (a collaborative group of the GFHT and MHEMO network) presents a review of the literature and proposals for the monitoring of FVIII:C levels in treated hemophilia A patients. The use of CSA calibrated with a plasma reference tested against the current FVIII WHO (World Health Organization) International Standard is recommended for the monitoring of patients treated with pdFVIII or rFVIII including extended half-life (EHL) rFVIII. OSA are adequate for the monitoring of patients treated with pdFVIII or with most of rFVIII concentrates. However, preliminary comparison with CSA is mandatory before measuring FVIII:C by OSA in patients treated by Refacto AF. For rFVIII-EHL, OSA are only acceptable for Elocta®. Great caution is therefore required when measuring FVIII:C levels by OSA in patients substituted by other EHL-rFVIII. Indeed, most of recent studies reported data obtained with spiked plasmas, which deserve to be confirmed on plasma samples collected in treated patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1684/abc.2019.1413DOI Listing
February 2019

[Factor IX assays in treated hemophilia B patients].

Ann Biol Clin (Paris) 2019 02;77(1):41-52

Service d'hématologie hémostase, Hospices civils de Lyon, Bron, France.

Replacement therapy with plasma-derived or recombinant FIX (pdFIX or rFIX) concentrates is the standard of treatment in patients with hemophilia B. The method predominantly used for measuring factor IX (FIX:C) levels is the one-stage clotting assay (OSA) but this method depends on the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) reagent and the coagulation analyzer used, and wide variations in the measurements of FIX recovery have been reported with some factor concentrates. The French study group on the biology of hemorrhagic diseases (a collaborative group of the GFHT and MHEMO network), presents a review of the literature and proposals for the monitoring of FIX:C levels in treated hemophilia B patients. The use of OSA calibrated with a plasma reference tested against the current FIX WHO International Standard is recommended for the monitoring of patients treated with pdFIX or rFIX. Chromogenic substrate assays (CSA) are adequate for the monitoring of patients treated with Rixubis, but data available for Benefix are currently too limited. For extended half-life rFIX (EHL-rFIX), large discordances in the FIX:C levels measured were evidenced, depending on the method and reagents used. Great attention is therefore required for measuring FIX:C levels by OSA in patients substituted by EHL-rFIX. Commercial kits for CSA are not equivalent, and although potentially useful, they are not validated for all EHL-rFIX. Most of recent studies reported data obtained with spiked plasmas, which deserve to be confirmed on plasma samples collected in treated patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1684/abc.2019.1414DOI Listing
February 2019

Brief Report on the 10th Meeting of the European Forum on Antiphospholipid Antibodies.

Curr Rheumatol Rep 2018 08 21;20(10):63. Epub 2018 Aug 21.

Vascular Medicine Division and Regional Competence Center for Rare Vascular and Systemic Autoimmune Diseases, CHRU de Nancy, F-54000, Nancy, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11926-018-0767-8DOI Listing
August 2018

Antiphospholipid antibodies can identify lupus patients at risk of pulmonary hypertension: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Autoimmun Rev 2017 Jun 12;16(6):576-586. Epub 2017 Apr 12.

CHRU de Nancy, Regional Competence Centre for Rare Vascular and Systemic Autoimmune Diseases, Vascular Medicine Division, Nancy F-54000, France; Inserm, UMR_S 1116, Nancy F-54000, France; Université de Lorraine, Nancy F-54000, France.

Background: Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a life-threatening condition that may affect outcomes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The role of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) on the risk of PH is controversial. Therefore our objective was to estimate the risk of PH (WHO groups 1-5) including associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (APAH, WHO group 1 only) related to aPL in patients with SLE.

Methods: Systematic review and meta-analysis were performed: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, congress abstracts, and reference lists of eligible studies were searched through 2015. Studies were selected if they included SLE patients with descriptions of the exposure to aPL and the outcomes (PH including APAH). Two reviewers extracted study characteristics and outcome data from published reports. Estimates were pooled using random effects models and sensitivity analyses. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42015016872.

Results: Of 984 identified abstracts, 31 primary studies (five cohorts, 13 case-control, 13 cross-sectional) met inclusion criteria, including 4480 SLE patients. Prevalence of PH in aPL-positive vs. aPL-negative SLE patients was 12.3% vs. 7.3%, respectively. The overall pooled odds ratio (OR) for PH was 2.28 (95% CI, 1.65 to 3.15) (I=39%). The risk of APAH was also significantly increased (OR=2.62 [95% CI, 1.11-6.15]). The risk of PH was the highest for lupus anticoagulant (OR=1.96 [95% CI, 1.31-2.92]) and IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (OR=2.64 [95% CI, 1.30-5.36]) while other antibodies were not significantly associated with PH.

Conclusions: Among SLE patients, aPL can identify patients at risk for PH and APAH. These findings warrant implementation of effective screening and early treatment strategies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.autrev.2017.04.003DOI Listing
June 2017

Underestimation of unfractionated heparin therapy assessment due to platelet activation when using partial-draw (pediatric) citrate collection tubes.

Thromb Res 2014 Nov 27;134(5):1117-22. Epub 2014 Aug 27.

Université Nice Sofia-Antipolis, CHU Saint Roch, Service d'Hématologie Biologique, Nice, France. Electronic address:

The "so-called" pediatric tubes are often used when collecting smaller blood volume is necessary, particularly in pediatric patients or in case of difficult/recurrent sampling. The aim of this multicenter study was to compare coagulation test results evaluated in evacuated polymer tubes containing 0.109 M citrate (1 vol./9 vol.) specifically designed to allow either a partial (2.0 mL,"pediatric") or a total (3.5 mL) filling. No significantly relevant discrepancy was found between routine coagulation test results in both tubes collected from untreated patients and from patients on vitamin K antagonist or low molecular weight heparin. In contrast, aPTT was significantly shorter and anti-FXa activity was significantly lower in partial-draw than in full-draw tubes collected from 46 patients receiving unfractionated heparin (UFH). This discrepancy was likely related to increased platelet activation in partial-draw tubes, as suggested by higher platelet factor 4 plasma concentrations and platelet P-Selectin expression in partial-draw than in full-draw citrate tubes. To confirm this hypothesis, we then evaluated partial-draw tubes containing CTAD, a mixture of anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents. In 25 patients on UFH, aPTT and anti-FXa activity were not significantly different in partial-draw CTAD tubes and in full-draw citrate tubes. In conclusion, despite increased platelet activation, samples collected into partial-draw citrate tubes allow accurate routine coagulation testing in all patients but those requiring UFH assessment, in which their use could lead to significant underestimation of anticoagulation. In such cases, partial-draw tubes containing CTAD could be validly used to monitor heparin therapy as well as to perform routine coagulation testing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2014.08.012DOI Listing
November 2014

[Antiphospholipid syndrome in nephrology. Kidney damage and practical aspects of the management].

Nephrol Ther 2014 Feb 7;10(1):1-9. Epub 2013 Oct 7.

Service de médecine vasculaire, centre de compétence régional des maladies vasculaires rares et systémiques et auto-immunes, institut lorrain du cœur et des vaisseaux Louis-Mathieu, CHU de Nancy, rue du Morvan, 54511 Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy, France; Inserm UMR_S 1116, Nancy University, 54000 Nancy, France.

The antiphospholipid syndrome is a thrombophilia characterized by the combination of arterial and/or venous thrombotic events or obstetric clinical events, associated with persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. In this syndrome, thromboses may affect all of the vascular tree, renal damage is frequently associated with a specific antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy. We propose in this review to provide updated recommendations on the management of antiphospholipid syndrome in nephrology. Treatment is based on long-term anticoagulant therapy with or without antiplatelet agents according to clinical events. The use of a conventional nephroprotection must not be forgotten (strict control of blood pressure with drugs blocking the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system). Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome is an extremely severe complication which can threaten the vital prognosis of the patient. This justifies particular surveillance, as well as prevention in high-risk situations. We also illustrate the difficulties of long-term management in these patients, both in dialysis or kidney transplantation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nephro.2013.07.368DOI Listing
February 2014

A modified international normalized ratio as an effective way of prothrombin time standardization in hepatology.

Hepatology 2007 Aug;46(2):528-34

AP-HP, Hôpital St Antoine, Unité d'Hémostase, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France.

Unlabelled: International Normalized Ratio (INR), which standardizes prothrombin time (PT) during oral anticoagulation, has been extended to standardize PT in liver diseases and is included in prognostic models such as the Model for End stage Liver Disease (MELD). However, mechanisms of PT prolongation in liver diseases differ from those involved in oral anticoagulation, and the thromboplastin reagents differ in their sensitivities to these 2 mechanisms. Our aim was to determine whether, in the calibration model for thromboplastins proposed by the World Health Organization, the use of plasmas from patients with liver diseases instead of plasmas from patients on oral anticoagulation could lead to a new INR specific for liver diseases (INR "LD"), achieving a real standardization of PT. First, 5 thromboplastins were calibrated against an international reference using 60 plasmas of patients with liver failure and, in a second step, the variation of PT reported as seconds, the ratio of patient PT to normal PT, INR, and INR"LD" was assessed in 34 other patients. MELD scores were calculated with the INR values obtained with the 5 thromboplastins. Only INR"LD" eliminated variability in PT results observed with the different thromboplastins. The discrepancy between MELD scores were up to 4 and 7 points in 52% and 17% of the patients, respectively.

Conclusion: INR "LD" may provide a common international scale of PT reporting in hepatology. Its adoption would be an important step because of the significant impact on MELD score induced by interlaboratory variability in INR determination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hep.21680DOI Listing
August 2007