Publications by authors named "Valérie Bonadona"

67 Publications

Immune checkpoint inhibitor sensitivity of DNA repair deficient tumors.

Immunotherapy 2021 Oct 8;13(14):1205-1213. Epub 2021 Sep 8.

Department of Medical Oncology, Centre Léon Bérard, 69008, Lyon, France.

Faithful DNA replication is necessary to maintain genome stability and implicates a complex network with several pathways depending on DNA damage type: homologous repair, nonhomologous end joining, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair and mismatch repair. Alteration in components of DNA repair machinery led to DNA damage accumulation and potentially carcinogenesis. Preclinical data suggest sensitivity to immune checkpoint inhibitors in tumors with DNA repair deficiency. Here, we review clinical studies that explored the use of immune checkpoint inhibitor in patient harboring tumor with DNA repair deficiency.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2021-0024DOI Listing
October 2021

Diagnostic chest X-rays and breast cancer risk among women with a hereditary predisposition to breast cancer unexplained by a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

Breast Cancer Res 2021 08 3;23(1):79. Epub 2021 Aug 3.

Institut Claudius Regaud - IUCT-Oncopole, Service d'Oncologie Médicale, Toulouse, France.

Background: Diagnostic ionizing radiation is a risk factor for breast cancer (BC). BC risk increases with increased dose to the chest and decreases with increased age at exposure, with possible effect modification related to familial or genetic predisposition. While chest X-rays increase the BC risk of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers compared to non-carriers, little is known for women with a hereditary predisposition to BC but who tested negative for a BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation.

Methods: We evaluated the effect of chest X-rays from diagnostic medical procedures in a dataset composed of 1552 BC cases identified through French family cancer clinics and 1363 unrelated controls. Participants reported their history of X-ray exposures in a detailed questionnaire and were tested for 113 DNA repair genes. Logistic regression and multinomial logistic regression models were used to assess the association with BC.

Results: Chest X-ray exposure doubled BC risk. A 3% increased BC risk per additional exposure was observed. Being 20 years old or younger at first exposure or being exposed before first full-term pregnancy did not seem to modify this risk. Birth after 1960 or carrying a rare likely deleterious coding variant in a DNA repair gene other than BRCA1/2 modified the effect of chest X-ray exposure.

Conclusion: Ever/never chest X-ray exposure increases BC risk 2-fold regardless of age at first exposure and, by up to 5-fold when carrying 3 or more rare variants in a DNA repair gene. Further studies are needed to evaluate other DNA repair genes or variants to identify those which could modify radiation sensitivity. Identification of subpopulations that are more or less susceptible to ionizing radiation is important and potentially clinically relevant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13058-021-01456-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8336294PMC
August 2021

Anti-müllerian hormone levels and antral follicle count in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline pathogenic variant: A retrospective cohort study.

Breast 2021 Oct 12;59:239-247. Epub 2021 Jul 12.

Centre Léon Bérard, Department of Surgical Oncology, 28 rue Laënnec, 69008, Lyon, France; Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon Sud University Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 165 Chemin Du Grand Revoyet, 69310, Pierre-Bénite, France; Research on Healthcare Performance RESHAPE, INSERM U1290, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, France. Electronic address:

Background: Some studies suggested a decreased ovarian reserve among BRCA1/2 pathogenic variant carriers, with conflicting results.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective single-center observational study of ovarian reserve and spontaneous fertility comparing BRCA1/2 pathogenic variant carriers to controls (women who attended consultations to discuss fertility preservation before gonadotoxic treatment). Measures of associations between plasma AMH concentration, AFC and BRCA1/2 status were modelled by nonlinear generalized additive regression models and logistic regressions adjusted for age at plasma storage, oral contraceptive use, body mass index, cigarette smoking, and the AMH assay technique.

Results: The whole population comprised 119 BRCA1/2 pathogenic variant carriers and 92 controls. A total of 110 women (42 carriers, among whom 30 were cancer-free, and 68 controls) underwent an ovarian reserve evaluation. Spontaneous fertility analysis included all women who previously attempted to become pregnant (134 women). We observed a tendency towards a premature decrease in ovarian reserve in BRCA1/2 pathogenic variant carriers, but no difference in mean AMH or AFC levels was found between BRCA1/2 pathogenic variant carriers and controls. An analysis of the extreme levels of AMH (≤5 pmol/l) and AFC (≤7 follicles) by logistic regression suggested a higher risk of low ovarian reserve among BRCA1/2 pathogenic variant carriers (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 3.57, 95% CI = 1.00-12.8, p = 0.05; and adjusted OR = 4.99, 95% CI = 1.10-22.62, p = 0.04, respectively).

Discussion: Attention should be paid to BRCA1/2 pathogenic variant carriers' ovarian reserve, considering this potential risk of premature alteration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.breast.2021.07.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8326804PMC
October 2021

Mutational analysis of apoptotic genes in familial aggregation of hematological malignancies.

Bull Cancer 2021 Sep 16;108(9):798-805. Epub 2021 Jun 16.

Université de Sousse, faculté de médecine de Sousse, UR biologie moléculaire des leucémies et lymphomes, Sousse, Tunisia.

Introduction: Apoptosis deregulation have been associated to tumorigenesis process and was highlighted as a prominent hallmark of cancer. Several mutations have been reported in several forms of Blood cancer. However, it has never been investigated in familial aggregations of hematological malignancies.

Methods: In this study, we performed a mutational analysis by sequencing the entire coding regions in four key apoptotic genes FAS, FASLG, CASP8 and CASP10 in 92 independent families belonging to French and Tunisian populations and diagnosed with several forms of familial hematological malignancies.

Results: We report 15 genetic variations among which 7 were previously reported in several form of cancers and have a potential effect on gene expression. Particularly, the CASP8 variants p.Asp302His and p.Lys337Lys were detected in 15% and 10% of our group of patients respectively and were previously reported in association to breast cancer and to breast cancer susceptibility.

Discussion: In this study, we do not report the underlining deleterious mutations in familial hematological malignancies, but we describe some variants with potential risk of developing blood cancer. To gain further insights on the association between apoptosis pathway deregulation and familial hematological malignancies, more apoptotic genes should be investigated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bulcan.2021.04.009DOI Listing
September 2021

Oral contraceptive use and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers: an international cohort study.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2021 07 22;225(1):51.e1-51.e17. Epub 2021 Jan 22.

Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Brno, Czech Republic.

Background: Ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers has been shown to decrease with longer duration of oral contraceptive use. Although the effects of using oral contraceptives in the general population are well established (approximately 50% risk reduction in ovarian cancer), the estimated risk reduction in mutation carriers is much less precise because of potential bias and small sample sizes. In addition, only a few studies on oral contraceptive use have examined the associations of duration of use, time since last use, starting age, and calendar year of start with risk of ovarian cancer.

Objective: This study aimed to investigate in more detail the associations of various characteristics of oral contraceptive use and risk of ovarian cancer, to provide healthcare providers and carriers with better risk estimates.

Study Design: In this international retrospective study, ovarian cancer risk associations were assessed using oral contraceptives data on 3989 BRCA1 and 2445 BRCA2 mutation carriers. Age-dependent-weighted Cox regression analyses were stratified by study and birth cohort and included breast cancer diagnosis as a covariate. To minimize survival bias, analyses were left truncated at 5 years before baseline questionnaire. Separate analyses were conducted for each aspect of oral contraceptive use and in a multivariate analysis, including all these aspects. In addition, the analysis of duration of oral contraceptive use was stratified by recency of use.

Results: Oral contraceptives were less often used by mutation carriers who were diagnosed with ovarian cancer (ever use: 58.6% for BRCA1 and 53.5% BRCA2) than by unaffected carriers (ever use: 88.9% for BRCA1 and 80.7% for BRCA2). The median duration of use was 7 years for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers who developed ovarian cancer and 9 and 8 years for unaffected BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers with ovarian cancer, respectively. For BRCA1 mutation carriers, univariate analyses have shown that both a longer duration of oral contraceptive use and more recent oral contraceptive use were associated with a reduction in the risk of ovarian cancer. However, in multivariate analyses, including duration of use, age at first use, and time since last use, duration of oral contraceptive use proved to be the prominent protective factor (compared with <5 years: 5-9 years [hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% confidence interval, 0.40-1.12]; >10 years [hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.73]; P=.008). The inverse association between duration of use and ovarian cancer risk persisted for more than 15 years (duration of ≥10 years; BRCA1 <15 years since last use [hazard ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.43]; BRCA1 >15 years since last use [hazard ratio, 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.18-0.59]). Univariate results for BRCA2 mutation carriers were similar but were inconclusive because of limited sample size.

Conclusion: For BRCA1 mutation carriers, longer duration of oral contraceptive use is associated with a greater reduction in ovarian cancer risk, and the protection is long term.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2021.01.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8278569PMC
July 2021

Gene- and pathway-level analyses of iCOGS variants highlight novel signaling pathways underlying familial breast cancer susceptibility.

Int J Cancer 2021 04 9;148(8):1895-1909. Epub 2021 Jan 9.

Département d'Anticipation et de Suivi des Cancers, Oncogénétique Clinique, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille, France.

Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in over 180 loci have been associated with breast cancer (BC) through genome-wide association studies involving mostly unselected population-based case-control series. Some of them modify BC risk of women carrying a BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation and may also explain BC risk variability in BC-prone families with no BRCA1/2 mutation. Here, we assessed the contribution of SNPs of the iCOGS array in GENESIS consisting of BC cases with no BRCA1/2 mutation and a sister with BC, and population controls. Genotyping data were available for 1281 index cases, 731 sisters with BC, 457 unaffected sisters and 1272 controls. In addition to the standard SNP-level analysis using index cases and controls, we performed pedigree-based association tests to capture transmission information in the sibships. We also performed gene- and pathway-level analyses to maximize the power to detect associations with lower-frequency SNPs or those with modest effect sizes. While SNP-level analyses identified 18 loci, gene-level analyses identified 112 genes. Furthermore, 31 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and 7 Atlas of Cancer Signaling Network pathways were highlighted (false discovery rate of 5%). Using results from the "index case-control" analysis, we built pathway-derived polygenic risk scores (PRS) and assessed their performance in the population-based CECILE study and in a data set composed of GENESIS-affected sisters and CECILE controls. Although these PRS had poor predictive value in the general population, they performed better than a PRS built using our SNP-level findings, and we found that the joint effect of family history and PRS needs to be considered in risk prediction models.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.33457DOI Listing
April 2021

MUTYH-associated polyposis: Review and update of the French recommendations established in 2012 under the auspices of the National Cancer institute (INCa).

Eur J Med Genet 2020 Dec 12;63(12):104078. Epub 2020 Oct 12.

Department of Genetics. Institut Curie. PSL Research University, Paris, France. Electronic address:

MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP) was first described in 2002. It is an autosomal recessive condition associated with germline pathogenic variants of both MUTYH alleles. In 2011, a group of French experts reviewed the available data on this syndrome and established recommendations concerning the indications and strategies for molecular analysis of the MUTYH gene in index cases and their relatives, as well as the clinical management of affected individuals under the auspices of the French Institut National du Cancer (INCa). Some of these recommendations have become obsolete as a result of recent progress, especially those concerning the molecular strategy for MUTYH testing, as this gene has recently been included in a consensus panel of 14 colorectal cancer predisposition genes, justifying revision of the previous report. We report here the revised version of this work, which successively considers the phenotype and tumor risks associated with this genotype, differential diagnoses, criteria and strategy for molecular genetic testing and recommendations for the management of affected individuals. We also discuss the phenotype and tumor risks associated with monoallelic pathogenic variants of MUTYH.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2020.104078DOI Listing
December 2020

National recommendations of the French Genetics and Cancer Group - Unicancer on the modalities of multi-genes panel analyses in hereditary predispositions to tumors of the digestive tract.

Eur J Med Genet 2020 Dec 8;63(12):104080. Epub 2020 Oct 8.

Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Department of Clinical Cancer Genetics, Aix Marseille Univ, INSERM, IRD, SESSTIM, Marseille, France.

In case of suspected hereditary predisposition to digestive cancers, next-generation sequencing can analyze simultaneously several genes associated with an increased risk of developing these tumors. Thus, "Gastro Intestinal" (GI) gene panels are commonly used in French molecular genetic laboratories. Lack of international recommendations led to disparities in the composition of these panels and in the management of patients. To harmonize practices, the Genetics and Cancer Group (GGC)-Unicancer set up a working group who carried out a review of the literature for 31 genes of interest in this context and established a list of genes for which the estimated risks associated with pathogenic variant seemed sufficiently reliable and high for clinical use. Pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes have been excluded. This expertise defined a panel of 14 genes of confirmed clinical interest and relevant for genetic counseling: APC, BMPR1A, CDH1, EPCAM, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, PMS2, POLD1, POLE, PTEN, SMAD4 and STK11. The reasons for the exclusion of the others 23 genes have been discussed. The paucity of estimates of the associated tumor risks led to the exclusion of genes, in particular CTNNA1, MSH3 and NTHL1, despite their implication in the molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of GI cancers. A regular update of the literature is planned to up-grade this panel of genes in case of new data on candidate genes. Genetic and epidemiological studies and international collaborations are needed to better estimate the risks associated with the pathogenic variants of these genes either selected or not in the current panel.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2020.104080DOI Listing
December 2020

[MUTYH-associated polyposis: Review and update of the French recommendations established in 2012 under the auspices of the National Cancer Institute (INCa)].

Bull Cancer 2020 May 1;107(5):586-600. Epub 2020 May 1.

PSL Research University, Institut Curie, département de génétique, 26, rue d'Ulm, 75248 Paris cedex 05, France. Electronic address:

MUTYH-associated polyposis (MUTYH-associated polyposis, MAP) is an autosomal recessive inheritance disorder related to bi-allelic constitutional pathogenic variants of the MUTYH gene which was first described in 2002. In 2011, a group of French experts composed of clinicians and biologists, performed a summary of the available data on this condition and drew up recommendations concerning the indications and the modalities of molecular analysis of the MUTYH gene in index cases and their relatives, as well as the management of affected individuals. In view of recent developments, some recommendations have become obsolete, in particular with regard to the molecular analysis strategy since MUTYH gene has been recently included in a consensus panel of 14 genes predisposing to colorectal cancer. This led us to revise all the points of the previous expertise. We report here the revised version of this work which successively considers the phenotype and the tumor risks associated with this genotype, the differential diagnoses, the indication criteria and the strategy of the molecular analysis and the recommendations for the management of affected individuals. We also discuss the phenotype and the tumor risks associated with mono-allelic pathogenic variants of MUTYH gene.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bulcan.2020.02.004DOI Listing
May 2020

Clinical outcome of breast cancer in carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations according to molecular subtypes.

Sci Rep 2020 04 27;10(1):7073. Epub 2020 Apr 27.

Department of Oncology, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève, Geneva, Switzerland.

BRCA1/BRCA2 genes play a central role in DNA repair and their mutations increase sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. There are conflicting data regarding the prognostic value of BRCA germline mutations in breast cancer (BC) patients. We collected clinical, pathological and genetic data of a cohort 925 BC patients preselected for genetic screening and treated with neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy, of whom 266 were BRCA carriers. Overall, 171 women carried a BRCA1 mutation, 95 carried a BRCA2 mutation, and 659 were non-carriers. In the entire cohort, there was a prolonged disease-free survival (DFS) for BRCA carriers (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.63; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.44-0.90 for BRCA1; HR = 0.72; 95%CI, 0.47-1.1 for BRCA2; p = 0.020) and a trend toward prolonged disease-specific survival (DSS; HR = 0.65; 95%CI, 0.40-1.1 for BRCA1; HR = 0.78; 95%CI, 0.44-1.38 for BRCA2; p = 0.19) though not statistically significant. In the TNBC group, BRCA carriers had prolonged DFS (adjusted HR = 0.50; 95%CI, 0.28-0.89 for BRCA1; adjusted HR = 0.37; 95%CI, 0.11-1.25, for BRCA2; p = 0.034) and DSS (adjusted HR = 0.42; 95%CI, 0.21-0.82 for BRCA1; adjusted HR = 0.45; 95%CI, 0.11-1.9 for BRCA2; p = 0.023). In the non-TNBC group, the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations did not have any impact on survival. These results suggest that BRCA1/BRCA2 germline mutations are associated with prolonged survival only if women were diagnosed with TNBC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-63759-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7184602PMC
April 2020

Association of Genomic Domains in and with Prostate Cancer Risk and Aggressiveness.

Cancer Res 2020 02 13;80(3):624-638. Epub 2019 Nov 13.

Unité de Prévention et d'Epidémiologie Génétique, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon, France.

Pathogenic sequence variants (PSV) in or () are associated with increased risk and severity of prostate cancer. We evaluated whether PSVs in were associated with risk of overall prostate cancer or high grade (Gleason 8+) prostate cancer using an international sample of 65 and 171 male PSV carriers with prostate cancer, and 3,388 and 2,880 male PSV carriers without prostate cancer. PSVs in the 3' region of (c.7914+) were significantly associated with elevated risk of prostate cancer compared with reference bin c.1001-c.7913 [HR = 1.78; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-2.52; = 0.001], as well as elevated risk of Gleason 8+ prostate cancer (HR = 3.11; 95% CI, 1.63-5.95; = 0.001). c.756-c.1000 was also associated with elevated prostate cancer risk (HR = 2.83; 95% CI, 1.71-4.68; = 0.00004) and elevated risk of Gleason 8+ prostate cancer (HR = 4.95; 95% CI, 2.12-11.54; = 0.0002). No genotype-phenotype associations were detected for PSVs in . These results demonstrate that specific PSVs may be associated with elevated risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer. SIGNIFICANCE: Aggressive prostate cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers may vary according to the specific BRCA2 mutation inherited by the at-risk individual.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-19-1840DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7553241PMC
February 2020

Clinical factors associated with prolonged response and survival under olaparib as maintenance therapy in BRCA mutated ovarian cancers.

Gynecol Oncol 2019 11 8;155(2):262-269. Epub 2019 Oct 8.

Department of Medical Oncology, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon, France; University Claude Bernard (UCBL Lyon1), Lyon, France.

Objective: To investigate clinical factors associated with prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in relapsing epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients with BRCA mutations and receiving olaparib as maintenance therapy in daily practice.

Methods: Multicenter (8 hospitals) European retrospective study of relapsing EOC patients having germline or somatic mutations of BRCA1/BRCA2 genes and treated with olaparib as maintenance therapy after platinum-based chemotherapy.

Results: One hundred and fifteen patients were included. Median age was 54 years. There were 90 BRCA1 carriers, 24 BRCA2 carriers and one patient had germline mutation of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Six patients had somatic mutations (all BRCA1) and 109 had germline mutations. Ninety percent had serous carcinomas and were platinum-sensitive. Following ultimate platinum-based chemotherapy, 69% of the patients had normalization of CA-125 levels and 87% had RECIST objective responses, either partial (53%) or complete (34%). After a median follow-up of 21 months, median PFS was 12.7 months and median OS was 35.4 months. In multivariate analysis, factors associated with prolonged PFS under olaparib were: platinum-free interval (PFI) ≥ 12 months, RECIST complete response (CR) or partial response (PR) and normalization of CA-125 upon ultimate platinum-based chemotherapy. Factors associated with prolonged OS were PFI ≥ 12 months, CR and normalization of CA-125.

Conclusions: Platinum-free interval ≥ 12 months, complete response and normalized CA-125 levels after ultimate platinum-based chemotherapy are associated with prolonged PFS and OS in relapsing BRCA1/BRCA2 mutated ovarian cancer patients who received olaparib as maintenance therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2019.09.008DOI Listing
November 2019

Oral Contraceptive Use and Breast Cancer Risk: Retrospective and Prospective Analyses From a BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carrier Cohort Study.

JNCI Cancer Spectr 2018 Apr 28;2(2):pky023. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Juravinski Hospital and Cancer Centre, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Background: For BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the association between oral contraceptive preparation (OCP) use and breast cancer (BC) risk is still unclear.

Methods: Breast camcer risk associations were estimated from OCP data on 6030 BRCA1 and 3809 BRCA2 mutation carriers using age-dependent Cox regression, stratified by study and birth cohort. Prospective, left-truncated retrospective and full-cohort retrospective analyses were performed.

Results: For BRCA1 mutation carriers, OCP use was not associated with BC risk in prospective analyses (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75 to 1.56), but in the left-truncated and full-cohort retrospective analyses, risks were increased by 26% (95% CI = 6% to 51%) and 39% (95% CI = 23% to 58%), respectively. For BRCA2 mutation carriers, OCP use was associated with BC risk in prospective analyses (HR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.03 to 2.97), but retrospective analyses were inconsistent (left-truncated: HR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.85 to 1.33; full cohort: HR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.28 to 1.81). There was evidence of increasing risk with duration of use, especially before the first full-term pregnancy (BRCA1: both retrospective analyses, < .001 and = .001, respectively; BRCA2: full retrospective analysis, = .002).

Conclusions: Prospective analyses did not show that past use of OCP is associated with an increased BC risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers in young middle-aged women (40-50 years). For BRCA2 mutation carriers, a causal association is also not likely at those ages. Findings between retrospective and prospective analyses were inconsistent and could be due to survival bias or a true association for younger women who were underrepresented in the prospective cohort. Given the uncertain safety of long-term OCP use for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, indications other than contraception should be avoided and nonhormonal contraceptive methods should be discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jncics/pky023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6649757PMC
April 2018

Mendelian randomisation study of height and body mass index as modifiers of ovarian cancer risk in 22,588 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

Br J Cancer 2019 07 19;121(2):180-192. Epub 2019 Jun 19.

Department of Gynaecological Oncology, Chris O'Brien Lifehouse and The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia.

Background: Height and body mass index (BMI) are associated with higher ovarian cancer risk in the general population, but whether such associations exist among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers is unknown.

Methods: We applied a Mendelian randomisation approach to examine height/BMI with ovarian cancer risk using the Consortium of Investigators for the Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) data set, comprising 14,676 BRCA1 and 7912 BRCA2 mutation carriers, with 2923 ovarian cancer cases. We created a height genetic score (height-GS) using 586 height-associated variants and a BMI genetic score (BMI-GS) using 93 BMI-associated variants. Associations were assessed using weighted Cox models.

Results: Observed height was not associated with ovarian cancer risk (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.07 per 10-cm increase in height, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.94-1.23). Height-GS showed similar results (HR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.85-1.23). Higher BMI was significantly associated with increased risk in premenopausal women with HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.06-1.48) and HR = 1.59 (95% CI: 1.08-2.33) per 5-kg/m increase in observed and genetically determined BMI, respectively. No association was found for postmenopausal women. Interaction between menopausal status and BMI was significant (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: Our observation of a positive association between BMI and ovarian cancer risk in premenopausal BRCA1/2 mutation carriers is consistent with findings in the general population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41416-019-0492-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6738050PMC
July 2019

BRCA1/BRCA2 germline mutations and chemotherapy-related hematological toxicity in breast cancer patients.

Breast Cancer Res Treat 2019 Apr 11;174(3):775-783. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Department of Oncology, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève, 4 Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil, 1205, Geneva, Switzerland.

Purpose: BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are central to DNA repair process through homologous recombination. We hypothesize that BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers may exhibit increased hematological toxicity when receiving genotoxic chemotherapy.

Methods: We included women with primary breast cancers screened for BRCA1/BRCA2 germline mutations and treated with (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy in Geneva (Swiss cohort). The primary endpoint was the incidence of febrile neutropenia following the first chemotherapy cycle (C1). Secondary endpoints were the incidence of grade 3-4 neutropenia, grade 4 neutropenia and hospitalization during C1, G-CSF use and chemotherapy dose reduction during the entire chemotherapy regimen. Long-term toxicities (hematological, cardiac and neuropathy) were assessed in the Swiss cohort and a second cohort of patients from Lyon (French cohort).

Results: Overall, 221 patients were assessed for acute hematological toxicity, including 23 BRCA1 and 22 BRCA2 carriers. Following the C1, febrile neutropenia had an incidence of 35% (p = 0.002), 14% (p = 0.562) and 10% among BRCA1, BRCA2 and non-carriers, respectively. Grade 4 neutropenia was found in 57% of BRCA1 (p < 0.001), 14% of BRCA2 (p = 0.861) and 18% of non-carriers. G-CSF support was necessary in 86% of BRCA1 (p = 0.005), 64% of BRCA2 (p = 0.285) and 51% of non-carriers. For long-term toxicity analysis, 898 patients were included (167 BRCA1-, 91 BRCA2- and 640 non-carriers). There was no difference between the 3 groups.

Conclusions: BRCA1 germline mutations is associated with greater acute hematological toxicity in breast cancer patients. These observations could have implication for primary prophylaxis with G-CSF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10549-018-05127-2DOI Listing
April 2019

Familial breast cancer and DNA repair genes: Insights into known and novel susceptibility genes from the GENESIS study, and implications for multigene panel testing.

Int J Cancer 2019 04 13;144(8):1962-1974. Epub 2018 Nov 13.

Institut Bergonié, Bordeaux, France.

Pathogenic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 only explain the underlying genetic cause of about 10% of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families. Because of cost-effectiveness, multigene panel testing is often performed even if the clinical utility of testing most of the genes remains questionable. The purpose of our study was to assess the contribution of rare, deleterious-predicted variants in DNA repair genes in familial breast cancer (BC) in a well-characterized and homogeneous population. We analyzed 113 DNA repair genes selected from either an exome sequencing or a candidate gene approach in the GENESIS study, which includes familial BC cases with no BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation and having a sister with BC (N = 1,207), and general population controls (N = 1,199). Sequencing data were filtered for rare loss-of-function variants (LoF) and likely deleterious missense variants (MV). We confirmed associations between LoF and MV in PALB2, ATM and CHEK2 and BC occurrence. We also identified for the first time associations between FANCI, MAST1, POLH and RTEL1 and BC susceptibility. Unlike other associated genes, carriers of an ATM LoF had a significantly higher risk of developing BC than carriers of an ATM MV (OR = 17.4 vs. OR = 1.6; p = 0.002). Hence, our approach allowed us to specify BC relative risks associated with deleterious-predicted variants in PALB2, ATM and CHEK2 and to add MAST1, POLH, RTEL1 and FANCI to the list of DNA repair genes possibly involved in BC susceptibility. We also highlight that different types of variants within the same gene can lead to different risk estimates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.31921DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6587727PMC
April 2019

[The French Genetic and Cancer Consortium guidelines for multigene panel analysis in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer predisposition].

Bull Cancer 2018 Oct 27;105(10):907-917. Epub 2018 Sep 27.

Institut Paoli-Calmettes, oncogénétique clinique, département d'anticipation et de suivi des cancers, 232, boulevard Sainte-Marguerite, 13009 Marseille, France; Aix-Marseille université, Inserm, IRD, SESSTIM, 13000 Marseille, France.

Introduction: Next generation sequencing allows the simultaneous analysis of large panel of genes for families or individuals with a strong suspicion of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer (HBOC). Because of lack of guidelines, several panels of genes potentially involved in HBOC were designed, with large disparities not only in their composition but also in medical care offered to mutation carriers. Then, homogenization in practices is needed.

Methods: The French Genetic and Cancer Group (GGC) - Unicancer conducted an exhaustive bibliographic work on 18 genes of interest. Only publications with unbiased risk estimates were retained.

Results: The expertise of each 18 genes was based on clinical utility criteria, i.e. a relative risk of cancer of 4 and more, available medical tools for screening and prevention of mutation carriers, and pre-symptomatic genetic tests for relatives. Finally, 13 genes were selected to be included in a HBOC diagnosis gene panel: BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, TP53, CDH1, PTEN, RAD51C, RAD51D, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, EPCAM. The reasons for excluding NBN, RAD51B, CHEK2, STK11, ATM, BARD1, BRIP1 from the HBOC diagnosis panel are presented. Screening, prevention and genetic counselling guidelines were detailed for each of the 18 genes.

Discussion: Due to the rapid increase in knowledge, the GGC has planned a yearly update of the bibliography to take into account new findings. Furthermore, genetic-epidemiological studies are being initiated to better estimate the cancer risk associated with genes which are not yet included in the HBOC diagnosis panel.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bulcan.2018.08.003DOI Listing
October 2018

Mutiple DICER1-related lesions associated with a germline deep intronic mutation.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2018 06 22;65(6):e27005. Epub 2018 Feb 22.

Service de Génétique, Institut Curie, Paris, France.

Germline DICER1 pathogenic variants predispose to numerous benign and malignant tumors. In this report, we describe DICER1 gene analysis in an adolescent diagnosed with multinodular goiter, ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor, and lung cyst. DICER1 mutational screening at the DNA level failed to detect any pathogenic variant. Subsequent messenger RNA (mRNA) analysis revealed a 132 nucleotide intronic sequence exonization. This truncating event was caused by a deep intronic mutation generating a de novo acceptor splice site. This study demonstrates that some undetected DICER1 mutations should be investigated at the mRNA level.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.27005DOI Listing
June 2018

Mutational spectrum in a worldwide study of 29,700 families with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

Hum Mutat 2018 05 12;39(5):593-620. Epub 2018 Mar 12.

Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Toronto, Canada.

The prevalence and spectrum of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported in single populations, with the majority of reports focused on White in Europe and North America. The Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) has assembled data on 18,435 families with BRCA1 mutations and 11,351 families with BRCA2 mutations ascertained from 69 centers in 49 countries on six continents. This study comprehensively describes the characteristics of the 1,650 unique BRCA1 and 1,731 unique BRCA2 deleterious (disease-associated) mutations identified in the CIMBA database. We observed substantial variation in mutation type and frequency by geographical region and race/ethnicity. In addition to known founder mutations, mutations of relatively high frequency were identified in specific racial/ethnic or geographic groups that may reflect founder mutations and which could be used in targeted (panel) first pass genotyping for specific populations. Knowledge of the population-specific mutational spectrum in BRCA1 and BRCA2 could inform efficient strategies for genetic testing and may justify a more broad-based oncogenetic testing in some populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.23406DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5903938PMC
May 2018

Location of Mutation in Gene and Survival in Patients with Ovarian Cancer.

Clin Cancer Res 2018 01 30;24(2):326-333. Epub 2017 Oct 30.

Department of Medical Oncology, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon, France.

BRCA2 plays a central role in homologous recombination by loading RAD51 on DNA breaks. The objective of this study is to determine whether the location of mutations in the RAD51-binding domain (RAD51-BD; exon 11) of gene affects the clinical outcome of ovarian cancer patients. A study cohort of 353 women with ovarian cancer who underwent genetic germline testing for and genes was identified. Progression-free survival (PFS), platinum-free interval (PFI), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort of ovarian cancer ( = 316) was used as a validation cohort. In the study cohort, 78 patients were carriers of germline mutations of After adjustment for FIGO stage and macroscopic residual disease, carriers with truncating mutations in the RAD51-BD have significantly prolonged 5-year PFS [58%; adjusted HR, 0.36; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.20-0.64; = 0.001] and prolonged PFI (29.7 vs. 15.5 months, = 0.011), compared with noncarriers. carriers with mutations located in other domains of the gene do not have prolonged 5-year PFS (28%, adjusted HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.42-1.07; = 0.094) or PFI (19 vs. 15.5 months, = 0.146). In the TCGA cohort, only carriers harboring germline or somatic mutations in the RAD51-BD have prolonged 5-year PFS (46%; adjusted HR, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.13-0.68; = 0.004) and 5-year OS (78%; adjusted HR, 0.09; 95% CI, 0.02-0.38; = 0.001). Among ovarian cancer patients, carriers with mutations located in the RAD51-BD (exon 11) have prolonged PFS, PFI, and OS. .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-17-2136DOI Listing
January 2018

GATA2 gene analysis in several forms of hematological malignancies including familial aggregations.

Ann Hematol 2017 Oct 27;96(10):1635-1639. Epub 2017 Jul 27.

UR "Biologie moléculaire des leucémies et lymphomes", Laboratoire de Biochimie, Faculté de Médecine de Sousse, Université de Sousse, Avenue Mohamed Karoui, 4000, Sousse, Tunisia.

The genetic predisposition to familial hematological malignancies has been previously reported highlighting inherited gene mutations. Several genes have been reported but genetic basis remains not well defined. In this study, we extended our investigation to a potential candidate GATA2 gene which was analyzed by direct sequencing in 119 cases including familial aggregations with a variety of hematological malignancies and sporadic acute leukemia belonging to Tunisian and French populations. We reported a deleterious p.Arg396Gln GATA2 mutation in one patient diagnosed with both sporadic acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and breast cancer. We also reported several GATA2 variations in familial cases. The absence of deleterious mutations in this large cohort of familial aggregations of hematological malignancies may strengthen the hypothesis that GATA2 mutations are an important predisposing factor, although as a secondary genetic event, required for the development of overt malignant disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-017-3076-9DOI Listing
October 2017

ARLTS1, potential candidate gene in familial aggregation of hematological malignancies.

Bull Cancer 2017 Feb 17;104(2):123-127. Epub 2016 Nov 17.

Université de Sousse, faculté de médecine de Sousse, laboratoire de Biochimie, UR « biologie moléculaire des leucémies et lymphomes », avenue Mohamed Karoui, 4000 Sousse, Tunisia.

Introduction: Genetic predisposition to familial hematological malignancies was previously described through several epidemiological analyses, but the genetic basis remains unclear. The tumor-suppressor ARLTS1 gene was previously described in sporadic hematological malignancies and familial cancer context.

Methods: In this study, we sequence the ARLTS1 gene in 100 patients belonging to 88 independent Tunisian and French families.

Results: After gene sequencing, we report 8 genetic variations, most of which were previously reported in several cancer forms. The most common variants were W149X and C148R and were previously associated to B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to high-risk of familial breast cancer.

Conclusions: These results emphasize the fact that ARLTS1 gene mutations can be considered as a potential predisposing factor in familial hematological malignancies and other several cancer forms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bulcan.2016.10.016DOI Listing
February 2017

Familial hematological malignancies: new IDH2 mutation.

Ann Hematol 2016 Dec 3;95(12):1943-1947. Epub 2016 Sep 3.

UR "Biologie moléculaire des leucémies et lymphomes," Laboratoire de Biochimie, Faculté de Médecine de Sousse, Université de Sousse - Tunisie, Avenue Mohamed Karoui, 4002, Sousse, Tunisia.

Isocitrate dehydrogenase IDH 1 and IDH 2 mutations were reported in several cancer forms, especially in hematological malignancies, but were never been investigated in familial aggregation. The aim of this study is to determine whether germline isocitrate dehydrogenase genes mutations are involved.We targeted IDH1 and IDH2 genes in 104 familial cases belonging to Tunisian and French populations, including several forms of hematological malignancies and cosegregated solid tumors.We report one IDH1 variant: c.315 G>T, p.Gly105Gly in 15 % of cases, which was assigned to the worst outcome in several studies. Three IDH2 variants were found, among them, one intronic substitution c.543+45 G>A (rs142033117) and two new variants not previously described: c.389 A>T, p.Lys130Met and c.414 T>C, p.Thr138Thr. The p.Lys130Met was found in one case diagnosed with Waldenstrom's disease with familial history of cancer. The enrolled in silico analysis, the functional study, and the absence of this variant in control population strengthen the hypothesis of its deleterious effect.From an extended number of candidate genes analyzed in familial hematological malignancies, IDH2 might be considerably involved since we reported a potential damaging effect.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-016-2813-9DOI Listing
December 2016

Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3.

Breast Cancer Res Treat 2017 01 28;161(1):117-134. Epub 2016 Oct 28.

Center for Medical Genetics, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, 9000, Ghent, Belgium.

Purpose: Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways.

Methods: Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of ~320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast and ovarian cancer risks in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained from 54 studies participating in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2.

Results: We identified a region on 11q22.3 that is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (most significant SNP rs228595 p = 7 × 10). This association was absent in BRCA2 carriers (p = 0.57). The 11q22.3 region notably encompasses genes such as ACAT1, NPAT, and ATM. Expression quantitative trait loci associations were observed in both normal breast and tumors across this region, namely for ACAT1, ATM, and other genes. In silico analysis revealed some overlap between top risk-associated SNPs and relevant biological features in mammary cell data, which suggests potential functional significance.

Conclusion: We identified 11q22.3 as a new modifier locus in BRCA1 carriers. Replication in larger studies using estrogen receptor (ER)-negative or triple-negative (i.e., ER-, progesterone receptor-, and HER2-negative) cases could therefore be helpful to confirm the association of this locus with breast cancer risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10549-016-4018-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5222911PMC
January 2017

Mutational analysis of JAK2, CBL, RUNX1, and NPM1 genes in familial aggregation of hematological malignancies.

Ann Hematol 2016 Jun 23;95(7):1043-50. Epub 2016 Apr 23.

UR "Biologie moléculaire des leucémies et lymphomes", Laboratoire de Biochimie, Faculté de Médecine de Sousse, Université de Sousse, Avenue Mohamed Karoui, 4000, Sousse, Tunisia.

Familial aggregation of hematological malignancies has been reported highlighting inherited genetic predisposition. In this study, we targeted four candidate genes: JAK2 and RUNX1 genes assuring a prominent function in hematological process and CBL and NPM1 as proto-oncogenes. Their disruption was described in several sporadic hematological malignancies. The aim of this study is to determine whether JAK2, CBL, RUNX1, and NPM1 germline genes mutations are involved in familial hematological malignancies. Using direct sequencing, we analyzed JAK2 (exons 12 and 14); CBL (exons 7, 8 and 9); NPM1 (exon 12) and the entire RUNX1 in 88 independent families belonging to Tunisian and French populations. Twenty-one sporadic acute leukemias were included in this study. We reported a heterozygous intronic c.1641 + 6 T > C JAK2 variant (rs182123615) found in two independent familial cases diagnosed with gastric lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. The in silico analysis suggested a potential impact on splicing, but the functional splicing minigene reporter assay on rs182123615 variant showed no aberrant transcripts. In one sporadic acute myeloblastic leukemia, we reported an insertion 846 in. TGTT in exon 12 of NPM1 gene that may impact the normal reading frame. The rs182123615 JAK2 variant was described in several contexts including myeloproliferative neoplasms and congenital erythrocytosis and was supposed to be pathogenic. Through this current study, we established the assessment of pathogenicity of rs182123615 and we classified it rather as rare polymorphism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-016-2678-yDOI Listing
June 2016

GENESIS: a French national resource to study the missing heritability of breast cancer.

BMC Cancer 2016 Jan 12;16:13. Epub 2016 Jan 12.

Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, France.

Background: Less than 20% of familial breast cancer patients who undergo genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carry a pathogenic mutation in one of these two genes. The GENESIS (GENE SISter) study was designed to identify new breast cancer susceptibility genes in women attending cancer genetics clinics and with no BRCA1/2 mutation.

Methods: The study involved the French national network of family cancer clinics. It was based on enrichment in genetic factors of the recruited population through case selection relying on familial criteria, but also on the consideration of environmental factors and endophenotypes like mammary density or tumor characteristics to assess potential genetic heterogeneity. One of the initial aims of GENESIS was to recruit affected sibpairs. Siblings were eligible when index cases and at least one affected sister were diagnosed with infiltrating mammary or ductal adenocarcinoma, with no BRCA1/2 mutation. In addition, unrelated controls and unaffected sisters were recruited. The enrolment of patients, their relatives and their controls, the collection of the clinical, epidemiological, familial and biological data were centralized by a coordinating center.

Results: Inclusion of participants started in February 2007 and ended in December 2013. A total of 1721 index cases, 826 affected sisters, 599 unaffected sisters and 1419 controls were included. 98% of participants completed the epidemiological questionnaire, 97% provided a blood sample, and 76% were able to provide mammograms. Index cases were on average 59 years old at inclusion, were born in 1950, and were 49.7 years of age at breast cancer diagnosis. The mean age at diagnosis of affected sisters was slightly higher (51.4 years). The representativeness of the control group was verified.

Conclusions: The size of the study, the availability of biological specimens and the clinical data collection together with the detailed and complete epidemiological questionnaire make this a unique national resource for investigation of the missing heritability of breast cancer, by taking into account environmental and life style factors and stratifying data on endophenotypes to decrease genetic heterogeneity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12885-015-2028-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4711059PMC
January 2016

Mutation analysis of PALB2 gene in French breast cancer families.

Breast Cancer Res Treat 2015 Dec 12;154(3):463-71. Epub 2015 Nov 12.

Unité d'Oncologie Génétique, Centre Paul Strauss, Strasbourg, France.

Several population-based and family-based studies have demonstrated that germline mutations of the PALB2 gene (Partner and Localizer of BRCA2) are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Distinct mutation frequencies and spectrums have been described depending on the population studied. Here we describe the first complete PALB2 coding sequence screening in the French population. We screened the complete coding sequence and intron-exon boundaries of PALB2, using the EMMA technique, to assess the contribution of pathogenic mutations in a set of 835 familial breast cancer cases and 662 unrelated controls from the French national study GENESIS and the Paul Strauss Cancer Centre, all previously tested negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2 pathogenic mutations. Our analysis revealed the presence of four novel deleterious mutations: c.1186insT, c.1857delT and c.2850delC in three cases, c.3418dupT in one control. In addition, we identified two in-frame insertion/deletion, 19 missense substitutions (two of them predicted as pathogenic), 9 synonymous variants, 28 variants located in introns and 2 in UTRs, as well as frequent variants. Truncating PALB2 mutations were found in 0.36% of familial breast cancer cases, a frequency lower than the one detected in comparable studies in other populations (0.73-3.40%). This suggests a small but significant contribution of PALB2 mutations to the breast cancer susceptibility in the French population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10549-015-3625-7DOI Listing
December 2015

Revisiting Li-Fraumeni Syndrome From TP53 Mutation Carriers.

J Clin Oncol 2015 Jul 26;33(21):2345-52. Epub 2015 May 26.

Gaëlle Bougeard, Mariette Renaux-Petel, Jean-Michel Flaman, Camille Charbonnier, Pierre Fermey, Julie Tinat, Stéphanie Baert-Desurmont, Thierry Frebourg, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (Inserm) U1079, University of Rouen, Institute for Research and Innovation in Biomedicine; Julie Tinat, Stéphanie Baert-Desurmont, Thierry Frebourg, University Hospital, Rouen; Muriel Belotti, Marion Gauthier-Villars, Dominique Stoppa-Lyonnet, Curie Institute, Paris; Emilie Consolino, Laurence Brugières, Olivier Caron, Patrick R. Benusiglio, Brigitte Bressac-de Paillerets, Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif; Valérie Bonadona, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 5558, University of Lyon 1, Leon Berard Cancer Center, Lyon; and Catherine Bonaïti-Pellié, Inserm UMR-S 669, University of Paris-Sud, Villejuif, France.

Purpose: The aim of the study was to update the description of Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), a remarkable cancer predisposition characterized by extensive clinical heterogeneity.

Patients And Methods: From 1,730 French patients suggestive of LFS, we identified 415 mutation carriers in 214 families harboring 133 distinct TP53 alterations and updated their clinical presentation.

Results: The 322 affected carriers developed 552 tumors, and 43% had developed multiple malignancies. The mean age of first tumor onset was 24.9 years, 41% having developed a tumor by age 18. In childhood, the LFS tumor spectrum was characterized by osteosarcomas, adrenocortical carcinomas (ACC), CNS tumors, and soft tissue sarcomas (STS) observed in 30%, 27%, 26%, and 23% of the patients, respectively. In adults, the tumor distribution was characterized by the predominance of breast carcinomas observed in 79% of the females, and STS observed in 27% of the patients. The TP53 mutation detection rate in children presenting with ACC or choroid plexus carcinomas, and in females with breast cancer before age 31 years, without additional features indicative of LFS, was 45%, 42% and 6%, respectively. The mean age of tumor onset was statistically different (P < .05) between carriers harboring dominant-negative missense mutations (21.3 years) and those with all types of loss of function mutations (28.5 years) or genomic rearrangements (35.8 years). Affected children, except those with ACC, harbored mostly dominant-negative missense mutations.

Conclusion: The clinical gradient of the germline TP53 mutations, which should be validated by other studies, suggests that it might be appropriate to stratify the clinical management of LFS according to the class of the mutation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2014.59.5728DOI Listing
July 2015
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