Publications by authors named "Vaishali D Phalke"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effectiveness of Interventional Reproductive and Sexual Health Education among School Going Adolescent Girls in Rural Area.

Indian J Community Med 2019 Oct-Dec;44(4):378-382

Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Rural Medical College, Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed University), Rahata, Maharashtra, India.

Background: Most adolescents lack access to age- and sex-appropriate health information which is vital for young people to make informed decisions about their reproductive sexual health.

Objectives: The study objective was to study the effectiveness of the interventional reproductive and sexual health education on knowledge, attitude, and menstrual practices of school-going adolescent girls.

Materials And Methods: It was an interventional study consisting of a pretest, intervention session, and posttest conducted among 400 school-going adolescent girls in a rural area of Maharashtra.

Results: There was a statistically significant increase in knowledge, attitude, and practice median scores following intervention ( < 0.05).

Conclusions: Age- and sex-appropriate health education programs can facilitate the development of healthy reproductive and sexual behavior patterns among adolescents through the enhancement of knowledge and development of right attitude.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijcm.IJCM_155_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6881892PMC
December 2019

Prescription writing practices in a rural tertiary care hospital in Western Maharashtra, India.

Australas Med J 2011 31;4(1):4-8. Epub 2011 Jan 31.

Professor, Department of Community Medicine (PSM), Rural Medical College, Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences, Loni, Maharashtra, India.

Background: Prescription is a written order from physician to pharmacist which contains name of drug, its dose and its method of dispensing and advice over consuming it. The frequency of drug prescription errors is high. Prescribing error contributes significantly towards adverse drug events. The present study was undertaken to understand the current prescription writing practices and to detect the common errors in them at a tertiary health care centre situated in a rural area of Western Maharashtra, India.

Method: A cross sectional study was conducted at a tertiary level hospital located at a rural area of Maharashtra state, India during October 2009-March 2010. 499 prescriptions coming to medical store during period of one month were considered for data analysis. Important information regarding the patient, doctor, drug and the general description of the prescription were obtained.

Results: All the prescriptions were on the hospital pad. A significant number of the prescriptions (n=88, 17.6%) were written in illegible handwriting and not easily readable. The name, age and sex of the patient were mentioned is majority of the prescriptions. All the prescriptions (100%) failed to demonstrate the presence of address, height and weight of the patient. Only the brand name of the drugs was mentioned in all the prescriptions with none of them having the generic name. The strength, quantity and route of administration of the drug were found on 73.1%, 65.3% and 75.2% prescriptions.

Conclusion: There are widespread errors in prescription writing by the doctors. Educational intervention programs and use of computer can substantially contribute in the lowering of such errors. A short course on prescription writing before the medical student enters the clinical field and strict monitoring by the administrative authorities may also help alleviate the problem.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4066/AMJ.2011.515DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3562966PMC
February 2013

A cross-sectional study of socio-demographic determinants of recurrent diarrhoea among children under five of rural area of Western Maharashtra, India.

Australas Med J 2011 28;4(2):72-5. Epub 2011 Feb 28.

Assistant Professor, Medical Intern Department of Community Medicine, Rural Medical College, Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences, Loni, Maharashtra, India.

Background: About 2 million episodes of diarrhoea occur each year in India. Of the 6.6 million deaths among children aged 28 days to 5 year; deaths from diarrhoea are estimated to account for 1.87 million. An average Indian child less than 5 years of age can have 2-3 episodes of diarrhoea. Mother's literacy, family income, feeding practices, environmental conditions are important determinants of the common childhood infection like diarrhoea. The present study was undertaken to study these important determinants of recurrent diarrhoea among children under five in a rural area of western Maharashtra, India.

Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted in six randomly selected villages of Ahmednagar district in western Maharashtra, India. Three villages from two primary health centres and 652 children under five from these villages were chosen by a simple random sampling technique (every fifth child enrolled in Anganwadi). House-to-house survey was done and data was collected by interviewing the mothers of these children. Nutritional status was assessed by measuring the weight and mid-arm circumference of the child. Statistical analysis was done with Microsoft Excel and StatistiXL 1.8 using percentage, proportions and chi-square test wherever applicable.

Results: The prevalence of recurrent diarrhoea was 9.81%. Recurrent diarrhoea was more common in the age group of 13 - 24 months (29.6%) and 25 - 36 months (23.4%) and children belonging to lower socioeconomic class (64%). Malnutrition was significantly associated with recurrent diarrhoea and 21% of malnourished children had the same. Recurrent diarrhoea was significantly more common (39.1%) among children with introduction of top-up feeds before four to six months.

Conclusion: Low socioeconomic status, bad sanitary practices, nutritional status and weaning practices significantly influence the prevalence of recurrent diarrhoea.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4066/AMJ.2011.524DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3562926PMC
February 2013
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