Publications by authors named "Vaida Juozaityte"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The ETS-5 transcription factor regulates activity states in by controlling satiety.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2017 02 13;114(9):E1651-E1658. Epub 2017 Feb 13.

Development and Stem Cells Program, Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute and Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800, Australia;

Animal behavior is shaped through interplay among genes, the environment, and previous experience. As in mammals, satiety signals induce quiescence in Here we report that the transcription factor ETS-5, an ortholog of mammalian FEV/Pet1, controls satiety-induced quiescence. Nutritional status has a major influence on behavior. When foraging, food availability controls behavioral state switching between active (roaming) and sedentary (dwelling) states; however, when provided with high-quality food, become sated and enter quiescence. We show that ETS-5 acts to promote roaming and inhibit quiescence by setting the internal "satiety quotient" through fat regulation. Acting from the ASG and BAG sensory neurons, we show that ETS-5 functions in a complex network with serotonergic and neuropeptide signaling pathways to control food-regulated behavioral state switching. Taken together, our results identify a neuronal mechanism for controlling intestinal fat stores and organismal behavioral states in , and establish a paradigm for the elucidation of obesity-relevant mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1610673114DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5338484PMC
February 2017

EGL-13/SoxD specifies distinct O2 and CO2 sensory neuron fates in Caenorhabditis elegans.

PLoS Genet 2013 May 9;9(5):e1003511. Epub 2013 May 9.

Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Animals harbor specialized neuronal systems that are used for sensing and coordinating responses to changes in oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2). In Caenorhabditis elegans, the O2/CO2 sensory system comprises functionally and morphologically distinct sensory neurons that mediate rapid behavioral responses to exquisite changes in O2 or CO2 levels via different sensory receptors. How the diversification of the O2- and CO2-sensing neurons is established is poorly understood. We show here that the molecular identity of both the BAG (O2/CO2-sensing) and the URX (O2-sensing) neurons is controlled by the phylogenetically conserved SoxD transcription factor homolog EGL-13. egl-13 mutant animals fail to fully express the distinct terminal gene batteries of the BAG and URX neurons and, as such, are unable to mount behavioral responses to changes in O2 and CO2. We found that the expression of egl-13 is regulated in the BAG and URX neurons by two conserved transcription factors-ETS-5(Ets factor) in the BAG neurons and AHR-1(bHLH factor) in the URX neurons. In addition, we found that EGL-13 acts in partially parallel pathways with both ETS-5 and AHR-1 to direct BAG and URX neuronal fate respectively. Finally, we found that EGL-13 is sufficient to induce O2- and CO2-sensing cell fates in some cellular contexts. Thus, the same core regulatory factor, egl-13, is required and sufficient to specify the distinct fates of O2- and CO2-sensing neurons in C. elegans. These findings extend our understanding of mechanisms of neuronal diversification and the regulation of molecular factors that may be conserved in higher organisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1003511DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3650002PMC
May 2013

A single gene target of an ETS-family transcription factor determines neuronal CO2-chemosensitivity.

PLoS One 2012 29;7(3):e34014. Epub 2012 Mar 29.

The Helen L. and Martin S. Kimmel Center for Biology and Medicine at the Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine, Molecular Neurobiology Program, New York, New York, United States of America.

Many animals possess neurons specialized for the detection of carbon dioxide (CO(2)), which acts as a cue to elicit behavioral responses and is also an internally generated product of respiration that regulates animal physiology. In many organisms how such neurons detect CO(2) is poorly understood. We report here a mechanism that endows C. elegans neurons with the ability to detect CO(2). The ETS-5 transcription factor is necessary for the specification of CO(2)-sensing BAG neurons. Expression of a single ETS-5 target gene, gcy-9, which encodes a receptor-type guanylate cyclase, is sufficient to bypass a requirement for ets-5 in CO(2)-detection and transforms neurons into CO(2)-sensing neurons. Because ETS-5 and GCY-9 are members of gene families that are conserved between nematodes and vertebrates, a similar mechanism might act in the specification of CO(2)-sensing neurons in other phyla.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0034014PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3315506PMC
November 2012
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