Publications by authors named "Vagner G Cortez"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Diversity trapped in cages: Revision of Blumenavia Möller (Clathraceae, Basidiomycota) reveals three hidden species.

PLoS One 2020 1;15(5):e0232467. Epub 2020 May 1.

Departamento de Botânica e Zoologia, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Sistemática e Evolução, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil.

Basidiomata of Phallales have a diversified morphology with adhesive gleba that exudes an odor, usually unpleasant that attracts mainly insects, which disperse the basidiospores. The genus Blumenavia belongs to the family Clathraceae and, based on morphological features, only two species are currently recognized: B. rhacodes and B. angolensis. However, the morphological characters adopted in species delimitations within this genus are inconsistent, and molecular data are scarce. The present study aimed to review and identify informative characters that contribute to the delimitation of Blumenavia species. Exsiccates from America and Africa were analyzed morphologically, and molecularly, using ITS, LSU, ATP6, RPB2 and TEF-1α markers for Maximum Parsimony, Bayesian and Maximum likelihood analyses, and also for coalescent based species delimitations (BP&P), as well as for bPTP, PhyloMap, Topo-phylogenetic and Geophylogenetic reconstructions. According to our studies, seven species can be considered in the genus: B. rhacodes and B. angolensis are maintained, B. usambarensis and B. toribiotalpaensis are reassessed, and three new species are proposed, B. baturitensis Melanda, M.P. Martín & Baseia, sp. nov., B. crucis-hellenicae G. Coelho, Sulzbacher, Grebenc & Cortez, sp. nov., and B. heroica Melanda, Baseia & M.P. Martín, sp. nov. Blumenavia rhacodes is typified by selecting a lectotype and an epitype. Macromorphological characters considered informative to segregate and delimit the species through integrative taxonomy include length of the basidiomata, color, width and presence of grooves on each arm as well as the glebifer position and shape. These must be clearly observed while the basidiomata are still fresh. Since most materials are usually analyzed after dehydration and deposit in collections, field techniques and protocols to describe fugacious characters from fresh specimen are demanded, as well as the use of molecular analysis, in order to better assess recognition and delimitation of species in Blumenavia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0232467PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7194408PMC
July 2020

Studies of the Antimicrobial Activity of Mushrooms (Agaricales) from South America (Review).

Int J Med Mushrooms 2018 ;20(11):1065-1074

Graduate Program in Botany, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, PR, Brazil.

South America harbors much of the world's biodiversity, representing a potential reservoir of species with diverse possibilities for use. From this perspective, mushroom species are included because they naturally produce a wide variety of substances, especially ones with antimicrobial activity. In this article we present a review of the literature on the antimicrobial activity of mushrooms collected in South America, emphasizing the bacteria and fungi these mushrooms inhibit, the main methodologies researchers use for antimicrobial tests, and some directions for future research. This review demonstrates that the agar diffusion test was the most prevalent method in studies of South American mushrooms. Most studies dealt with specimens collected in Chile (16 species), Brazil (10 species), and Uruguay (2 species), and 27 of those species presented antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, most research developed with Basidiomycetes in South America aimed only to screen antimicrobial agents, whereas few studies explored the antimicrobial potential of purified secondary metabolites. Thus it is very important to conduct research in order to screen for and isolate antimicrobial substances, which researchers can then use to develop new antimicrobial drugs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1615/IntJMedMushrooms.2018028771DOI Listing
June 2019

Dog intoxication by lizard's claw mushroom, Lysurus cruciatus (higher Basidiomycetes) in southern Brazil.

Int J Med Mushrooms 2014 ;16(3):269-71

Centro de Informacoes Toxicologicas-CIT-RS, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.

A case of mushroom poisoning of a dog caused by a phalloid fungus is reported for the first time. The phalloid caused gastrointestinal syndrome in a 1-year-old dog, and was identified as Lysurus cruciatus, a common phalloid fungus in southern Brazil.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1615/intjmedmushr.v16.i3.70DOI Listing
January 2015

A new species of Stropharia with hymenial acanthocytes.

Mycologia 2007 Jan-Feb;99(1):135-8

Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Botânica, Av. Bento Gonçalves, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.

Stropharia acanthocystis is described as a new species from southern Brazil. It is characterized by the lack of an annulus and the presence of acanthocytes in the hymenium.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3852/mycologia.99.1.135DOI Listing
September 2007