Publications by authors named "V Kati��"

19 Publications

Sacred oak woods increase bird diversity and specialization: Links with the European Biodiversity Strategy for 2030.

J Environ Manage 2021 Sep 8;294:112982. Epub 2021 Jun 8.

Department of Biological Applications and Technology, University of Ioannina, 45110, Ioannina, Greece. Electronic address:

Sacred groves in Greece are usually forest remnants with large trees around chapels, protected through centuries by Orthodox religion. We examined the comparative ecological value of 20 oak-dominated sacred groves vs managed oakwoods, in terms of their habitat characteristics and avian communities (passerines and woodpeckers). Sacred groves have maintained a more pronounced old-growth character than managed oakwoods in terms of average Diameter at Breast Height (DBH) and tree height. Besides holding significantly greater bird species richness and abundance, they supported greater functional richness, phylogenetic diversity, and phylogenetic bird species variability. Bird communities in sacred groves were more heterogeneous and showed greater avian specialization levels than in managed woods. Generalized Linear Models showed that the main factor positively affecting all aspects of bird diversity was DBH, while the abundance of dead trees increased bird abundance. Our results underline the importance of maintaining large-sized trees in forest management practices to support bird diversity and decrease biotic homogenization. Since the new European Biodiversity Strategy explicitly requires all remaining European primary and old-growth forests to be strictly protected by 2030, we argue that sacred groves, despite their small size, meet the criteria to be considered in the strict protection and restoration targets of the strategy, as primary old growth woods of high biodiversity value.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2021.112982DOI Listing
September 2021

Sown Wildflowers Enhance Habitats of Pollinators and Beneficial Arthropods in a Tomato Field Margin.

Plants (Basel) 2021 May 17;10(5). Epub 2021 May 17.

Scientific Directorate of Pesticides Control and Phytopharmacy, Benaki Phytopathological Institute, 8 Stefanou Delta Str., 14561 Kifissia, Greece.

We evaluated the capacity of selected plants, sown along a processing tomato field margin in central Greece and natural vegetation, to attract beneficial and Hymenoptera pollinating insects and questioned whether they can distract pollinators from crop flowers. Measurements of flower cover and attracted pollinators and beneficial arthropods were recorded from early-May to mid-July, during the cultivation period of the crop. Flower cover was higher in the sown mixtures compared to natural vegetation and was positively correlated with the number of attracted pollinators. The sown , , , and attracted mainly wild bees, which were the most abundant pollinating insects. In the natural vegetation, attracted mainly honeybees, while Asteraceae, Convolvulaceae, and Apiaceae species attracted wild bees. Beneficial arthropod abundance and diversity were higher in the sown mixture. Tomato flowers were visited by a small number of wild bees. Their number was not affected by the distance from the field margin, indicating no distraction effect from the sown or natural vegetation flowering plants. Our results suggest that selected flowering plants can improve the field margin habitats for pollinating insects and beneficial arthropods, but more work is needed to elucidate the effect on crop pollination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/plants10051003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8156626PMC
May 2021

Practices to Conserve Pollinators and Natural Enemies in Agro-Ecosystems.

Insects 2021 Jan 5;12(1). Epub 2021 Jan 5.

Scientific Directorate of Pesticides Assessment and Phytopharmacy, Benaki Phytopathological Institute, 7 Ekalis str., 145 61 Kifissia, Greece.

Intensive agriculture has put great pressure on populations of beneficial arthropods such as natural enemies and pollinators, especially through adverse effects of pesticide use and the impact on resources in the agricultural landscape, i [...].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/insects12010031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7824878PMC
January 2021

The biodiversity-wind energy-land use nexus in a global biodiversity hotspot.

Sci Total Environ 2021 May 2;768:144471. Epub 2021 Jan 2.

Natural History Museum of Crete, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.

Wind energy is the leading renewable technology towards achieving climate goals, yet biodiversity trade-offs via land take are emerging. Thus, we are facing the paradox of impacting on biodiversity to combat climate change. We suggest a novel method of spatial planning that enhances windfarm sustainability: investments are prioritized in the most fragmented zones that lie outside the Natura 2000 network of protected areas. We showcase it in Greece, a biodiversity hotspot with a strong climate policy and land conflict between conservation and wind energy schemes. The analysis indicates that the suggested investment zone supports wind harnessing 1.5 times higher than the 2030 national goal, having only marginally lower (4%) wind speed. It performs well for the conservation of the annexed habitats and species of the two Nature Directives and it greatly overlaps with the Important Bird Areas (93%) and the roadless areas (80%) of Greece. It also greatly overlaps (82%-91%) with the exclusion zones suggested according to three sensitivity maps for bird conservation. Since land use change triggers biodiversity decline, we underline the necessity of such approaches for meeting both climate and biodiversity goals and call for a greater environmental policy convergence towards biodiversity conservation and no net land take.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.144471DOI Listing
May 2021

Butterfly phenology in Mediterranean mountains using space-for-time substitution.

Ecol Evol 2020 Jan 2;10(2):928-939. Epub 2020 Jan 2.

Department of Biological Applications and Technology University of Ioannina Ioannina Greece.

Inferring species' responses to climate change in the absence of long-term time series data is a challenge, but can be achieved by substituting space for time. For example, thermal elevational gradients represent suitable proxies to study phenological responses to warming. We used butterfly data from two Mediterranean mountain areas to test whether mean dates of appearance of communities and individual species show a delay with increasing altitude, and an accompanying shortening in the duration of flight periods. We found a 14-day delay in the mean date of appearance per kilometer increase in altitude for butterfly communities overall, and an average 23-day shift for 26 selected species, alongside average summer temperature lapse rates of 3°C per km. At higher elevations, there was a shortening of the flight period for the community of 3 days/km, with an 8.8-day average decline per km for individual species. Rates of phenological delay differed significantly between the two mountain ranges, although this did not seem to result from the respective temperature lapse rates. These results suggest that climate warming could lead to advanced and lengthened flight periods for Mediterranean mountain butterfly communities. However, although multivoltine species showed the expected response of delayed and shortened flight periods at higher elevations, univoltine species showed more pronounced delays in terms of species appearance. Hence, while projections of overall community responses to climate change may benefit from space-for-time substitutions, understanding species-specific responses to local features of habitat and climate may be needed to accurately predict the effects of climate change on phenology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.5951DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6988524PMC
January 2020
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