Publications by authors named "V E Popov"

2,086 Publications

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Test of Lepton-Flavor Universality in B→K^{*}ℓ^{+}ℓ^{-} Decays at Belle.

Phys Rev Lett 2021 Apr;126(16):161801

INFN-Sezione di Napoli, 80126 Napoli.

We present a measurement of R_{K^{*}}, the branching fraction ratio B(B→K^{*}μ^{+}μ^{-})/B(B→K^{*}e^{+}e^{-}), for both charged and neutral B mesons. The ratio for the charged case R_{K^{*+}} is the first measurement ever performed. In addition, we report absolute branching fractions for the individual modes in bins of the squared dilepton invariant mass q^{2}. The analysis is based on a data sample of 711  fb^{-1}, containing 772×10^{6}  BB[over ¯] events, recorded at the ϒ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e^{+}e^{-} collider. The obtained results are consistent with standard model expectations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.126.161801DOI Listing
April 2021

Mildronate protects heart mtDNA from oxidative stress toxicity induced by exhaustive physical exercise.

Arch Biochem Biophys 2021 Apr 27;705:108892. Epub 2021 Apr 27.

Department of Genetics, Cytology and Bioengineering, Voronezh State University, Voronezh, Russia; Voronezh State University of Engineering Technologies, Voronezh, Russia.

Exhaustive physical exercises are potentially dangerous for human's physical health and may lead to chronic heart disease. Therefore, individuals involved in such activity require effective and safe cardioprotectors. The goal of this research was to study Mildronate (a cardioprotective drug) effect on the level of oxidative stress markers in hearts of mice under conditions of exhausting physical exercise, such as forced swimming for 1 h per day for 7 days. Forced swimming lead to mtDNA damage accumulation, increase in diene conjugates level and loss of reduced glutathione despite an increase in antioxidant genes expression and activation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Mildronate treatment reduced oxidative stress, probably due to the inhibition of fatty acids transport to mitochondria and an increase in the intensity of glucose oxidation, which in part confirms by increase in glucose transporter expression. Thus, we can assume that Mildronate is an effective cardioprotector in exhaustive physical exercises.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.abb.2021.108892DOI Listing
April 2021

High molecular weight sodium hyaluronate improves survival of syndecan-1-deficient septic mice by inhibiting neutrophil migration.

PLoS One 2021 30;16(4):e0250327. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, United States of America.

Methods: Sepsis was induced by cotton smoke inhalation followed by intranasal administration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in female (> 6 months) Balb/c and syndecan-1 knockout mice. Survival of mice, lung capillary endothelial glycocalyx integrity, lung water content, and vascular hyper-permeability were determined with or without HMW-SH treatment in these mice. Effects of HMW-SH on endothelial permeability and neutrophil migration were tested in in vitro setting.

Results: In septic wildtype mice, we found a severely damaged pulmonary microvascular endothelial glycocalyx and elevated levels of shed syndecan-1 in the circulation. These changes were associated with significantly increased pulmonary vascular permeability. In septic syndecan-1 knockout mice, extravascular lung water content was higher, and early death was observed. The administration of HMW-SH significantly reduced mortality and lung water content in septic syndecan-1 knockout mice, but not in septic wildtype mice. In in vitro setting, HMW-SH inhibited neutrophil migration and reduced cultured endothelial cell permeability increases. However, these effects were reversed by the addition of recombinant syndecan-1 ectodomain.

Conclusions: HMW-SH reduced lung tissue damage and mortality in the absence of syndecan-1 protein, possibly by reducing vascular hyper-permeability and neutrophil migration. Our results further suggest that increased shed syndecan-1 protein levels are linked with the inefficiency of HMW-SH in septic wildtype mice.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0250327PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8087021PMC
April 2021

Detection of Influenza Virus Using a SOI-Nanoribbon Chip, Based on an N-Type Field-Effect Transistor.

Biosensors (Basel) 2021 Apr 12;11(4). Epub 2021 Apr 12.

Laboratory of Nanobiotechnology, Institute of Biomedical Chemistry, 119121 Moscow, Russia.

The detection of influenza A virions with a nanoribbon detector (NR detector) has been demonstrated. Chips for the detector have been fabricated based on silicon-on-insulator nanoribbon structures (SOI nanoribbon chip), using a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible technology-by means of gas-phase etching and standard optical photolithography. The surface of the SOI nanoribbon chip contains a matrix of 10 nanoribbon (NR) sensor elements. SOI nanoribbon chips of n-type conductance have been used for this study. For biospecific detection of target particles, antibodies against influenza virus have been covalently immobilized onto NRs. Influenza A virus detection was performed by real-time registration of the source-drain current through the NRs. The detection of the target viral particles was carried out in buffer solutions at the target particles concentration within the range from 10 to 10 viral particles per milliliter (VP/mL). The lowest detectable concentration of the target viral particles was 6 × 10 M (corresponding to 10 VP/mL). The use of solutions containing ~10 to 10 VP/mL resulted in saturation of the sensor surface with the target virions. In the saturation mode, detection was impossible.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/bios11040119DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8069153PMC
April 2021