Publications by authors named "V Beatrici"

10 Publications

MRI/US fusion prostate biopsy in men on active surveillance: Our experience.

Arch Ital Urol Androl 2021 Mar 22;93(1):88-91. Epub 2021 Mar 22.

Azienda Ospedaliera Ospedali Riuniti Marche Nord, Division of Urology, Pesaro.

Aim: The upgrading or staging in men with prostate cancer (PCA) undergoing active surveillance (AS), defined as Gleason score (GS) ≥ 3+4 or more than 2 area with cancer, was investigated in our experience using the software-based fusion biopsy (FB).

Methods: We selected from our database, composed of 620 biopsies, only men on AS according to criteria of John Hopkins Protocol (T1c, < 3 positive cores, GS = 3+3 = 6). Monitoring consisted of PSA measurement every 3 months, a clinical examination every 6 months, confirmatory FB within 6 months and then annual FB in all men. The suspicious MRI lesions were scored according to the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) classification version 2. FB were performed with a transrectal elastic free-hand fusion platform. The overall and clinically significant cancer detection rate was reported. Secondary, the diagnostic role of systematic biopsies was evaluated.

Results: We selected 56 patients on AS with mean age 67.4 years, mean PSA 6.7 ng/ml and at least one follow-up MRI-US fusion biopsy (10 had 2 or 3 follow-up biopsies). Lesions detected by MRI were: PIRADS-2 in 5, PIRADS-3 in 28, PIRADS-4 in 18 pts and PIRADS-5 in 5 patients. In each MRI lesion, FB with 2.1 ± 1.1 cores were taken with a mean total cores of 13 ± 2.4 including the systematic cores. The overall cancer detection rate was 71% (40/56): 62% (25/40) in target core and 28% (15/40) in systematic core. The overall significant cancer detection rate was 46% (26/56): 69% (18/26) in target vs 31% (8/26) in random cores.

Conclusions: The incidence of clinical significant cancer was 46% in men starting active surveillance, but it was more than doubled using MRI/US Target Biopsy 69% (18/26) rather than random cores (31%, 8/26). However, 1/3 of disease upgrades would have been missed if only the targeted biopsies were performed. Based on our experience, MRI/US fusion target biopsy must be associated to systematic biopsies to improve detection of significant cancer, reducing the risks of misclassification.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/aiua.2021.1.88DOI Listing
March 2021

Elastic fusion biopsy versus systematic biopsy for prostate cancer detection: Results of a multicentric study on 1,119 patients.

Actas Urol Esp (Engl Ed) 2019 Oct 31;43(8):431-438. Epub 2019 May 31.

Departamento de Ciencias Quirúrgicas, Urología, Universitad de Turín, Turín, Italia.

Objectives: To assess the accuracy of targeted and systematic biopsies for the detection of prostate cancer (PCa) and clinically significant PCa (csPCa) in the everyday practice, evaluating the need for additional systematic biopsies at the time of targeted biopsy.

Patients And Methods: From our multicentric database gathering data on 2,115 patients who underwent fusion biopsy with Koelis™ system between 2010 and 2017, we selected 1,119 patients who received targeted biopsies (a median of 3 for each target), followed by systematic sampling of the prostate (12 to 14 cores). Overall and clinically significant cancer detection rate (CDR) of Koelis™ fusion biopsies were assessed, comparing target and systematic biopsies. Secondary endpoint was the identification of predictors of PCa detection.

Results: The CDR of targeted biopsies only was 48% for all cancers and 33% for csPCa. The performance of additional, systematic prostate sampling improved the CDR of 15% for all cancers and of 12% for csPCa. PCa was detected in 35%, 69%, and 92% of patients with lesions scored as PI-RADS 3, 4 and 5, respectively. Elevated PI-RADS score and positive digital rectal examination were predictors of PCa, whereas biopsy-naïve status was associated with csPCa.

Conclusion: In the everyday practice target biopsy with Koelis™ achieves a good CDR for all PCa and csPCa, which is significantly improved by subsequent systematic sampling of the prostate. The outstanding outcomes of fusion biopsy are confirmed also in biopsy-naïve patients. Elevated PI-RADS score and positive digital rectal examination are strongly associated with presence of PCa.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acuro.2019.01.009DOI Listing
October 2019

A multicentric study on accurate grading of prostate cancer with systematic and MRI/US fusion targeted biopsies: comparison with final histopathology after radical prostatectomy.

World J Urol 2019 Oct 16;37(10):2109-2117. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

Department of Urology, Jules Bordet Institute, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Boulevard de Waterloo 121, 1000, Brussels, Belgium.

Objective: To evaluate the accuracy in histologic grading of MRI/US image fusion biopsy by comparing histopathology between systematic biopsies (SB), targeted biopsies (TB) and the combination of both (SB + TB) with the final histopathologic outcomes of radical prostatectomy specimens.

Materials And Methods: Retrospective, multicentric study of 443 patients who underwent SB and TB using MRI/US fusion technique (Urostation and Trinity) prior to radical prostatectomy between 2010 and 2017. Cochran's Q test and McNemar test were conducted as a post hoc test. Uni-multivariable analyses were performed on several clinic-pathological variables to analyze factors predicting histopathological concordance for targeted biopsies.

Results: Concordance in ISUP (International Society of Urological Pathology) grade between SB, TB and SB + TB with final histopathology was 49.4%, 51.2%, and 63.2% for overall prostate cancer and 41.2%, 48.3%, and 56.7% for significant prostate cancer (ISUP grade ≥ 2), respectively. Significant difference in terms of concordance, downgrading and upgrading was found between SB and TB (ISUP grade ≥ 2 only), SB and SB + TB, TB and SB + TB (overall ISUP grade and ISUP grade ≥ 2) (p < 0.001). Total number of cores and previous biopsies were significant independent predictive factors for concordance with TB technique.

Conclusion: In this retrospective study, combination of SB and TB significantly increased concordance with final histopathology despite a limited additional number of cores needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00345-019-02634-9DOI Listing
October 2019

Accuracy of elastic fusion biopsy in daily practice: Results of a multicenter study of 2115 patients.

Int J Urol 2018 12 5;25(12):990-997. Epub 2018 Sep 5.

Department of Urology, Institut Jules Bordet, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.

Objectives: To assess the accuracy of Koelis fusion biopsy for the detection of prostate cancer and clinically significant prostate cancer in the everyday practice.

Methods: We retrospectively enrolled 2115 patients from 15 institutions in four European countries undergoing transrectal Koelis fusion biopsy from 2010 to 2017. A variable number of target (usually 2-4) and random cores (usually 10-14) were carried out, depending on the clinical case and institution habits. The overall and clinically significant prostate cancer detection rates were assessed, evaluating the diagnostic role of additional random biopsies. The cancer detection rate was correlated to multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging features and clinical variables.

Results: The mean number of targeted and random cores taken were 3.9 (standard deviation 2.1) and 10.5 (standard deviation 5.0), respectively. The cancer detection rate of Koelis biopsies was 58% for all cancers and 43% for clinically significant prostate cancer. The performance of additional, random cores improved the cancer detection rate of 13% for all cancers (P < 0.001) and 9% for clinically significant prostate cancer (P < 0.001). Prostate cancer was detected in 31%, 66% and 89% of patients with lesions scored as Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System 3, 4 and 5, respectively. Clinical stage and Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System score were predictors of prostate cancer detection in multivariate analyses. Prostate-specific antigen was associated with prostate cancer detection only for clinically significant prostate cancer.

Conclusions: Koelis fusion biopsy offers a good cancer detection rate, which is increased in patients with a high Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System score and clinical stage. The performance of additional, random cores seems unavoidable for correct sampling. In our experience, the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System score and clinical stage are predictors of prostate cancer and clinically significant prostate cancer detection; prostate-specific antigen is associated only with clinically significant prostate cancer detection, and a higher number of biopsy cores are not associated with a higher cancer detection rate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/iju.13796DOI Listing
December 2018

Blue light cystoscopy with hexylaminolevulinate: Our 7 years experience.

Arch Ital Urol Androl 2017 Mar 31;89(1):39-41. Epub 2017 Mar 31.

Azienda Ospedaliera Ospedali Riuniti Marche Nord, Pesaro-Fano.

Aim: The objective of the present study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of hexylaminolevulinate (HAL) blue light cystoscopy compared with standard white light cystoscopy (WLC) in daily practice.

Materials And Methods: An observational, comparative, controlled (within patient) study was carried out at our Center. 61 consecutive patients with suspected or confirmed bladder cancer were recruited for the study from January 2008 until January 2015. Patients with suspected bladder cancer (positive cytology with negative WLC) or history of previous high-grade NMIBC or CIS were included in the study. Biopsies/resection of each positive lesion/suspicious areas were always taken after the bladder was inspected under WLC and BLC. Diagnoses of bladder tumor or CIS were considered as positive results, and the presence of normal urothelium in the biopsy specimen as negative result.

Results: 61 BLC were performed. 15/61 (24.5%) with suspected initial diagnosis of NMIBC and 46/61 (75.5%) with a history of high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). We performed a total of 173 biopsies/TURBT of suspicious areas: 129 positive only to the BLC and 44 both positive to WLC and BLC. 84/173 biopsies/TURBT were positive for cancer. All 84 NMIBC were positive to the BLC, while 35/84 were positive to the WLC with a sensitivity of BLC and WLC respectively of 100% and 41.7%. Sensitivity of WLC for highgrade NMIBC and CIS was 34.1% and 39% respectively while sensitivity of BLC for high-grade NMIBC and CIS was 100%. The specificity of the WLC was 79.9% compared to 48.5% of the BLC. The positive predictive value of BLC and WLC were respectively 48% (95% CI: 0.447-0.523) and 79% (95% CI: 0.856-0.734).

Conclusions: Our data confirm those reported in the literature: BLC increases the detection rate of NMIBC particularly in high risk patients (history of CIS or high grade). BLC is a powerful diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of bladder cancer if malignancy is suspected (positive urine cytology) and if conventional WLC is negative.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/aiua.2017.1.39DOI Listing
March 2017
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