Publications by authors named "Usmaan Omer"

3 Publications

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A Rapid Review of Prescribing Education Interventions.

Med Sci Educ 2021 Feb 16;31(1):273-289. Epub 2020 Nov 16.

Health Professions Education Unit, Hull York Medical School, University of York, York, YO10 5DD UK.

Introduction: Many studies conducted on the causes and nature of prescribing errors have highlighted the inadequacy of teaching and training of prescribers. Subsequently, a rapid review was undertaken to update on the nature and effectiveness of educational interventions aimed at improving the prescribing skills and competencies.

Methods: Twenty-two studies taking place between 2009 and 2019 were identified across nine databases.

Results And Discussion: This review reinforced the importance of the WHO Guide to Good Prescribing to prescribing curriculum design as well as the effectiveness of small group teaching. However, it also highlighted the lack of innovation in prescribing education and lack of longitudinal follow-up regarding the effectiveness of prescribing education interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40670-020-01131-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8368780PMC
February 2021

What makes a model prescriber? A documentary analysis.

Med Teach 2021 02 8;43(2):198-207. Epub 2020 Nov 8.

Health Professions Education Unit, Hull York Medical School, University of York, York, UK.

Introduction: In recent years, the authority to prescribe medications in healthcare has expanded to include pharmacists, nurses and Allied Healthcare Professionals. Subsequently, the quantity of guidelines describing appropriate prescribing practice has increased. Despite this, the literature notes a lack of consensus regarding the overall qualities of a good prescriber. The aim of this study was to attempt to define what makes a model prescriber in practice, regardless of professional background.

Methods: A documentary analysis of UK-based and international prescribing practice guidelines was performed. Data analysis was conducted through a constructivist grounded theory approach to enable concepts to be identified from the data itself without the use of pre-defined categories.

Results: A total of 13 guideline documents were analysed. Overall, four core categories of a model prescriber in practice were identified: Knowledgeable: including that of disease and drug properties; Safe: relating to appropriate drug quantities and treatment-monitoring; Good Communicators: with both patients and colleagues; Contemporary: through enhancing knowledge and skills.

Conclusions: These four categories can serve as a definition of a high-level prescriber and as an additional tool for prescribing educators to evaluate the extent their curriculum develops and assesses the core qualities needed by their students to be high-level prescribers in practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0142159X.2020.1839031DOI Listing
February 2021

A study to investigate the impact of a blended learning teaching approach to teach pharmacy law.

Int J Pharm Pract 2019 Jun 13;27(3):303-310. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

School of Pharmacy, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Objective: To describe the implementation and assess the effect of a blended learning approach to teach pharmacy law.

Methods: Twenty didactic pharmacy law lectures were redeveloped to 9 h of flipped classroom sessions. Presession online videos delivered factual content created in-house. In-class activities explored the application and nuances of law through simulated cases. Stage 2 Pharmacy undergraduate students (n = 69) were administered the Community of Inquiry Survey, measuring the social, teaching and cognitive presence of online learning experiences across 34 items on a Likert scale 1-5 (1 = 'strongly agree', to 5 = 'strongly disagree'). Four focus groups were undertaken and analysed thematically to explore student perceptions. Performance at the final summative law examination was recorded and compared to that of two previous cohorts given traditional, didactic teaching.

Key Findings: Fifty-three students (76.8% response) completed the survey. The mean ranking was 3.6 ± 0.7, 3.6 ± 0.6 and 3.3 ± 0.7 for teaching, social and cognitive presence, and most positively rated statements related to material design and organization. All students passed the summative law examination performing not significantly different to the previous cohorts. Focus group discussions demonstrated that students liked the online and interactive case-study materials, but wanted more direction and preferred smaller group sessions. Students had mixed feelings about needing an online social component.

Conclusions: Blended learning transformed the pharmacy law teaching from didactic to an interactive learning experience. The student feedback was generally mixed, but offered many recommendations to optimize the design and format of the course. Examination performance appeared to be unaffected by the change in teaching style.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijpp.12503DOI Listing
June 2019
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