Publications by authors named "Usama Shaker Mohamed"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Before and After Bariatric Surgery: a Prospective Study with 2-Year Follow-Up.

Obes Surg 2022 04 20;32(4):1141-1148. Epub 2022 Jan 20.

General Surgery Department, Kasralainy School of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.

Purpose: Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is linked to obesity. Bariatric surgery may be associated with calcium and vitamin D deficiencies leading to SHPT. This study aimed to detect the prevalence of SHPT before and after bariatric surgery.

Methods: This prospective study assessed the prevalence of SHPT after sleeve gastrectomy (SG, n = 38) compared to one-anastomosis gastric bypass (OAGB, n = 86). All patients were followed up for 2 years. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

Results: Of the 124 patients, 71 (57.3%) were females, and 53 (42.7%) were males, with a mean age of 37.5 ± 8.8 years. Before surgery, 23 patients (18.5%) suffered from SHPT, and 40 (32.3%) had vitamin D deficiency. The prevalence of SHPT increased to 29.8% after 1 year and 36.3% after 2 years. SHPT was associated with lower levels of vitamin D and calcium and higher reduction of BMD in the hip but not in the spine. After 2 years, SHPT was associated with a significantly lower T-score in the hip. SHPT and vitamin D deficiency were significantly more common in patients subjected to OAGB compared to SG (p = 0.003, and p < 0.001, respectively). There is a strong negative correlation between vitamin D levels and parathormone levels before and after surgery.

Conclusion: Prevalence of SHPT is high in obese patients seeking bariatric surgery, especially with lower vitamin D levels. Bariatric surgery increases the prevalence of SHPT up to 2 years. Gastric bypass is associated with a higher risk of developing SHPT compared to SG.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11695-022-05902-7DOI Listing
April 2022

Ursodeoxycholic acid for the prevention of gall stones after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: a prospective controlled study.

Surg Endosc 2022 Jan 12. Epub 2022 Jan 12.

General Surgery Department, Kasralainy School of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.

Background: Obesity is a risk factor for cholelithiasis. Besides, rapid weight loss after bariatric surgery upsurges the rate of cholelithiasis and acute cholecystitis. This study aimed to compare gallstone development frequency after LSG under ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) prophylaxis.

Methods: This prospective controlled study included 332 patients scheduled for LSG randomized to receive 500 mg UDCA daily for 12 months (UDCA Group) or no treatment (Control Group). Ultrasonography was done 6 and 12 months after surgery to detect gallstones. Cholecystectomy was done for complicated cases of cholelithiasis.

Results: Seventy-one patients were lost to follow-up, and 3 developed severe adverse effects of UDCA and excluded. Data are presented for 130 patients in the UDCA group and 128 in the Control group. Collectively, 11 patients (8.5%) of the UDCA group and 41 (32.0%) of the Control group developed gall stones during the first postoperative year (p < 0.001). Cholecystectomy was indicated in 3 patients (2.3%) of the UDCA group and 9 (7.0%) of the Control group (p = 0.072). On multivariate analysis, higher BMI, dyslipidemia, and lacking UDCA prophylaxis were the independent factors significantly associated with stone development. Also, stone development was associated with higher weight loss after 6 and 12 months.

Conclusion: UDCA 500 mg once daily for 12 months after LSG is effective in reducing gallstone formation at 1 year. UDCA administration reduced the frequency of cholecystectomies from 7 to 2.3%. High BMI and dyslipidemia are the independent preoperative factors significantly associated with stone development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-021-08980-3DOI Listing
January 2022
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