Publications by authors named "Urszula Mantaj"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The transcriptome-wide association search for genes and genetic variants which associate with BMI and gestational weight gain in women with type 1 diabetes.

Mol Med 2021 01 20;27(1). Epub 2021 Jan 20.

Center for Medical Genomics OMICRON, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland.

Background: Clinical data suggest that BMI and gestational weight gain (GWG) are strongly interconnected phenotypes; however, the genetic basis of the latter is rather unclear. Here we aim to find genes and genetic variants which influence BMI and/or GWG.

Methods: We have genotyped 316 type 1 diabetics using Illumina Infinium Omni Express Exome-8 v1.4 arrays. The GIANT, ARIC and T2D-GENES summary statistics were used for TWAS (performed with PrediXcan) in adipose tissue. Next, the analysis of association of imputed expression with BMI in the general and diabetic cohorts (Analysis 1 and 2) or GWG (Analysis 3 and 4) was performed, followed by variant association analysis (1 Mb around identified loci) with the mentioned phenotypes.

Results: In Analysis 1 we have found 175 BMI associated genes and 19 variants (p < 10) which influenced GWG, with the strongest association for rs11465293 in CCL24 (p = 3.18E-06). Analysis 2, with diabetes included in the model, led to discovery of 1812 BMI associated loci and 207 variants (p < 10) influencing GWG, with the strongest association for rs9690213 in PODXL (p = 9.86E-07). In Analysis 3, among 648 GWG associated loci, 2091 variants were associated with BMI (FDR < 0.05). In Analysis 4, 7 variants in GWG associated loci influenced BMI in the ARIC cohort.

Conclusions: Here, we have shown that loci influencing BMI might have an impact on GWG and GWG associated loci might influence BMI, both in the general and T1DM cohorts. The results suggest that both phenotypes are related to insulin signaling, glucose homeostasis, mitochondrial metabolism, ubiquitinoylation and inflammatory responses.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s10020-020-00266-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7818927PMC
January 2021

Early Screening for Gestational Diabetes Using IADPSG Criteria May Be a Useful Predictor for Congenital Anomalies: Preliminary Data from a High-Risk Population.

J Clin Med 2020 Nov 4;9(11). Epub 2020 Nov 4.

Department of Reproduction, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 60-512 Poznan, Poland.

Background: Our aim was to investigate whether the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) glycemic thresholds used for detecting hyperglycemia in pregnancy can be predictive for malformations in women with hyperglycemia detected in early pregnancy.

Methods: a single-center, retrospective observational trial of 125 mother-infant pairs from singleton pregnancies with hyperglycemia according to the IADPSG criteria diagnosed at the gestational age below 16 weeks. Glucose values obtained from 75-g OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test) were investigated as predictors for congenital malformations in newborns.

Results: Characteristics of the cohort: maternal age: 31.5 ± 5.2, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m: 42.0%, gestational age at diagnosis (weeks): 12.0 ± 4.0, and newborns with congenital malformations: 8.8%. Fasting blood glycemia (FBG) and HbA1c (Haemoglobin A1c) at baseline significantly predicted the outcome (expB: 1.06 (1.02-1.1), = 0.007 and expB: 2.05 (1.24-3.38), = 0.005, respectively). Both the fasting blood glucose (FBG) value of 5.1 mmol/dL (diagnostic for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)) and 5.5 mmol/dL (upper limit for normoglycemia in the general population) significantly increased the likelihood ratio (LR) for fetal malformations: 1.3 (1.1; 1.4) and 1.5 (1.0; 2.4), respectively.

Conclusions: (1) Fasting glycemia diagnostic for GDM measured in early pregnancy is associated with a significantly elevated risk for congenital malformations. (2) Our data suggest that women at elevated risks of GDM/diabetes in pregnancy (DiP) should have their fasting blood glucose assessed before becoming pregnant, and the optimization of glycemic control should be considered if the FBG exceeds 5.1 mmol/dL.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm9113553DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7694288PMC
November 2020

Pregnancy Outcomes in Women with Long-Duration Type 1 Diabetes-25 Years of Experience.

J Clin Med 2020 Oct 8;9(10). Epub 2020 Oct 8.

Department of Reproduction, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Polna 33, 60-525 Poznań, Poland.

Aims: Our study aimed to examine the pregnancy outcomes (maternal and fetal) concerning different models of antenatal care across a period of over 25 years (1993-2018) in 459 women with type 1 diabetes. Data from patients with a history of the condition lasting at least 15 years were considered eligible for analysis.

Methods: The study group was divided into three cohorts based on the different models of treatment used in Poznan University Hospital, Poland: 1993-2000 (cohort I, = 91), 2001-2005 (cohort II, = 83), 2006-2018 (cohort III, = 284). To identify predictors for the selected dichotomous outcomes, we calculated the risks for fetal or maternal complications as dependent variables for cohorts II and III against cohort I, using multivariate logistic regression analysis.

Results: The mean gestational age was 36.8 ± 2.4 weeks in the total cohort. The percentages of deliveries before the 33rd and the 37th weeks was high. We observed a decreasing percentage during the following periods, from 41.5% in the first period to 30.4% in the third group. There was a tendency for newborn weight to show a gradual increase across three time periods (2850, 3189, 3321 g, < 0.0001). In the last period, we noticed significantly more newborns delivered after 36 weeks with a weight above 4000 g and below 2500 g. Caesarean section was performed in 88% of patients from the whole group, but in the subsequent periods this number visibly decreased (from 97.6%, 86.7%, to 71%, = 0.001). The number of emergency caesarean sections was lowest in the third period (27.5%, 16.7%, 11.2%, = 0.006). We observed a decreasing number of "small for gestational age" newborns (SGA) in consecutive periods of treatment (from 24.4% to 8.7%, = 0.002), but also a higher percentage of "large for gestational age" (LGA) newborns (from 6.1% to 21.6%, = 0.001). Modification of treatment might be associated with the gradual reduction of SGA rates (cohort I 3.6%, cohort III 2.3% < 0,0005).

Conclusions: Strict glycemic and blood pressure control from the very beginning of pregnancy, as well as modern fetal surveillance techniques, may contribute to the improvement of perinatal outcomes in women with long-duration type 1 diabetes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm9103223DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7600991PMC
October 2020

Poor glycaemic control contributes to a shift towards prothrombotic and antifibrinolytic state in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

PLoS One 2020 8;15(10):e0237843. Epub 2020 Oct 8.

Department of Reproduction, Chair of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Oncology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland.

Ojectives: Thrombotic and antifibrinolytic influence of Diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM) on haemostasis have been well demonstrated. There has been no research assessing the influence of poor glycemic control on thrombus formation under flow conditions in vitro or in pregnant type 1 diabetic women to date.

Patients/methods: This study compared singleton pregnant T1DM women (n = 21) and control pregnant subjects without any metabolic disease (n = 15). The T1DM group was divided into two subgroups of sufficient (SGC-DM; HbA1c ≤6,5%,n = 15) and poor glycaemic control (PGC-DM; HbA1c >6,5%,n = 6). Evaluation of the whole blood thrombogenicity we assessed using T-TAS® at a shear rate of 240 s-1 (Total-Thrombus Analysis System, Zacros, Japan).

Results: Blood clot formation initiation time (T10) was significantly shortened in PGC-DM subgroup when compared to SGC-DM subgroup (p = 0,03). The area under the curve (AUC30) of blood clot time formation and the MPV (mean platelet volume) values were substantially higher in the PGC-DM subgroup in comparison to the SGC-DM group (p = 0,03). Negative correlations were noted between HbA1c and T10 values (p = 0,02) and between T10 and MPV values in the T1DM group (p = 0,04).

Conclusions: Poor glycaemic control in T1DM subjects triggers a shift towards a prothrombotic and antifibrinolytic state. This phenomenon can be detected using the novel system for quantitative assessment of the platelet thrombus formation process under flow conditions in vitro. The alteration of T-TAS values in PGC-DM subgroup proves that a poor glycemic control-related shift of the equilibrium toward thrombogenesis occurs in this group of patients. Our findings need a further elucidation in research on more massive data sets to be confirmed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0237843PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7544075PMC
November 2020

Mitochondrial GWAS and association of nuclear - mitochondrial epistasis with BMI in T1DM patients.

BMC Med Genomics 2020 07 7;13(1):97. Epub 2020 Jul 7.

Center for Medical Genomics OMICRON, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland.

Background: BMI is a strong indicator of complications from type I diabetes, especially under intensive treatment.

Methods: We have genotyped 435 type 1 diabetics using Illumina Infinium Omni Express Exome-8 v1.4 arrays and performed mitoGWAS on BMI. We identified additive interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear variants in genes associated with mitochondrial functioning MitoCarta2.0 and confirmed and refined the results on external cohorts: the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) and GTEx data. Linear mixed model analysis was performed using the GENESIS package in R/Bioconductor.

Results: We find a borderline significant association between the mitochondrial variant rs28357980, localized to MT-ND2, and BMI (β = - 0.69, p = 0.056). This BMI association was confirmed on 1889 patients from FHS cohort (β = - 0.312, p = 0.047). Next, we searched for additive interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear variants. MT-ND2 variants interacted with variants in the genes SIRT3, ATP5B, CYCS, TFB2M and POLRMT. TFB2M is a mitochondrial transcription factor and together with TFAM creates a transcription promoter complex for the mitochondrial polymerase POLRMT. We have found an interaction between rs3021088 in MT-ND2 and rs6701836 in TFB2M leading to BMI decrease (inter_pval = 0.0241), while interaction of rs3021088 in MT-ND2 and rs41542013 in POLRMT led to BMI increase (inter_pval = 0.0004). The influence of these interactions on BMI was confirmed in external cohorts.

Conclusions: Here, we have shown that variants in the mitochondrial genome as well as additive interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear SNPs influence BMI in T1DM and general cohorts.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12920-020-00752-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7341625PMC
July 2020

Nutritional Lifestyle Intervention in Obese Pregnant Women, Including Lower Carbohydrate Intake, Is Associated With Increased Maternal Free Fatty Acids, 3-β-Hydroxybutyrate, and Fasting Glucose Concentrations: A Secondary Factorial Analysis of the European Multicenter, Randomized Controlled DALI Lifestyle Intervention Trial.

Diabetes Care 2019 08 10;42(8):1380-1389. Epub 2019 Jun 10.

Gender Medicine Unit, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine III, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria

Objective: In our randomized controlled trial, we investigated the impact of healthy eating (HE) aiming for restricted gestational weight gain (GWG) and physical activity (PA) interventions on maternal and neonatal lipid metabolism.

Research Design And Methods: Obese pregnant women ( = 436) were included before 20 weeks' gestation and underwent glucose testing (oral glucose tolerance test) and lipid profiling at baseline and 24-28 and 35-37 gestational weeks after an at least 10-h overnight fast. This secondary analysis had a factorial design with comparison of HE ( = 221) versus no HE ( = 215) and PA ( = 218) versus no PA ( = 218). Maternal changes in triglycerides (TG), LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, free fatty acids (FFAs), and leptin from baseline to end of pregnancy and neonatal outcomes were analyzed using general linear models with adjustment for relevant parameters.

Results: At 24-28 weeks' gestation, FFAs (mean ± SD, 0.60 ± 0.19 vs. 0.55 ± 0.17 mmol/L, < 0.01) were increased after adjustment for FFA at baseline, maternal age, BMI at time of examination, gestational week, insulin resistance, self-reported food intake, self-reported physical activity, and maternal smoking, and GWG was lower (3.3 ± 2.6 vs. 4.3 ± 2.8 kg, < 0.001, adjusted mean differences -1.0 [95% CI -1.5; -0.5]) in HE versus no HE. Fasting glucose levels (4.7 ± 0.4 vs. 4.6 ± 0.4 mmol/L, < 0.05) and 3-β-hydroxybutyrate (3BHB) (0.082 ± 0.065 vs. 0.068 ± 0.067 mmol/L, < 0.05) were higher in HE. Significant negative associations between carbohydrate intake and FFA, 3BHB, and fasting glucose at 24-28 weeks' gestation were observed. No differences between groups were found in oral glucose tolerance test or leptin or TG levels at any time. Furthermore, in PA versus no PA, no similar changes were found. In cord blood, elevated FFA levels were found in HE after full adjustment (0.34 ± 0.22 vs. 0.29 ± 0.16 mmol/L, = 0.01).

Conclusions: HE intervention was associated with reduced GWG, higher FFAs, higher 3BHB, and higher fasting glucose at 24-28 weeks of gestation, suggesting induction of lipolysis. Increased FFA was negatively associated with carbohydrate intake and was also observed in cord blood. These findings support the hypothesis that maternal antenatal dietary restriction including carbohydrates is associated with increased FFA mobilization.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc19-0418DOI Listing
August 2019

Maternal risk factors for neonatal acidosis in women with type 1 diabetes.

Pol Arch Intern Med 2019 05 25;129(5):316-320. Epub 2019 Apr 25.

Division of Reproduction, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland

INTRODUCTION Type 1 diabetes in the mother is associated with high risk of adverse neonatal outcomes. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to identify maternal factors associated with low arterial pH values (pH <7.10) in infants of mothers with type 1 diabetes. PATIENTS AND METHODS Data from 789 women were included in the analysis. Based on pH values in the umbilical arteries of infants, women were divided into 2 groups: those with normal pH, defined as pH of 7.1 or higher, and those with low pH, defined as pH lower than 7.1. A logistic regression analysis was used to identify the determinants of low pH in the umbilical artery, with data presented as odds ratios and 95% CIs. RESULTS Low umbilical artery pH was observed in 72 infants (9.1%). There was an association between maternal glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels measured before delivery and low umbilical artery pH (odds ratio [OR] 1.40; 95% CI, 1.11-1.78; P = 0.01). A similar association was found for HbA1c levels measured between 20 and 24 weeks' gestation (OR 1.29; 95% CI, 1.03-1.63; P = 0.03). There was no association between the levels of HbA1c in the first trimester or lack of preconception care and low umbilical artery pH. In logistic regression, urgent cesarean section was associated with low umbilical artery pH (OR, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.11-2.44; P = 0.01), and this association was independent of HbA1c levels measured before delivery. CONCLUSIONS Lack of sufficient glycemic control in pregnancy is the strongest predictor of neonatal acidosis in women with type 1 diabetes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.20452/pamw.14809DOI Listing
May 2019

Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion reduces neonatal risk in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

Ginekol Pol 2019 ;90(3):154-160

Department of Reproduction, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland.

Objectives: An attempt was made to demonstrate the superiority of the treatment model using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) over multiple daily injections (MDI) of insulin in achieving a successful pregnancy outcome and good newborn's condition in patients with type 1 diabetes.

Material And Methods: The study included 297 infants born to type 1 diabetic patients; 175 patients were treated with MDI and 122 with CSII. Maternal metabolic control during pregnancy, gestational weight gain, insulin requirements, pregnancy outcome and neonatal status were compared between MDI and CSII arm. The composite adverse neonatal outcome was diagnosed if at least one of the following was found: abnormal birth weight (LGA or SGA), congenital malformation, miscarriage, intrauterine fetal death, emergency CS due to fetal risk, iatrogenic prematurity, RDS, hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and the postpartum pH in the umbilical artery ≤ 7.1.

Results: The studied groups did not differ regarding gestational week at delivery, a proportion of births at full term, preterm births, miscarriages, or late pregnancy losses (intrauterine fetal death > 22 weeks). Newborns of mothers treated with CSII showed lower incidence of neonatal complications (composite adverse neonatal outcome) compared to those of mothers treated with MDI (60% vs 74%, respectively; p = 0.01). We did not find any association between the mode of treatment and composite adverse maternal outcome.

Conclusions: The use of CSII in the treatment of pregnant women with type 1 diabetes was associated with reduced number of neonatal complications presented as neonatal composite outcome but had no influence on maternal outcome.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5603/GP.2019.0028DOI Listing
February 2020

Risk factors for hyperglycemia in pregnancy in the DALI study differ by period of pregnancy and OGTT time point.

Eur J Endocrinol 2018 Jul 8;179(1):39-49. Epub 2018 May 8.

Department of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

Objective: Risk factors are widely used to identify women at risk for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) without clear distinction by pregnancy period or oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) time points. We aimed to assess the clinical risk factors for Hyperglycemia in pregnancy (HiP) differentiating by these two aspects.

Design And Methods: Nine hundred seventy-one overweight/obese pregnant women, enrolled in the DALI study for preventing GDM. OGTTs were performed at ≤19 + 6, 24-28 and 35-37 weeks (IADPSG/WHO2013 criteria). Women with GDM or overt diabetes at one time point did not proceed to further OGTTs. Potential independent variables included baseline maternal and current pregnancy characteristics.

Statistical Analysis: Multivariate logistic regression.

Results: Clinical characteristics independently associated with GDM/overt diabetes were at ≤19 + 6 weeks, previous abnormal glucose tolerance (odds ratio (OR): 3.11; 95% CI: 1.41-6.85), previous GDM (OR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.20-4.11), neck circumference (NC) (OR: 1.58; 95% CI: 1.06-2.36 for the upper tertile), resting heart rate (RHR, OR: 1.99; 95% CI: 1.31-3.00 for the upper tertile) and recruitment site; at 24-28 weeks, previous stillbirth (OR: 2.92; 95% CI: 1.18-7.22), RHR (OR: 3.32; 95% CI: 1.70-6.49 for the upper tertile) and recruitment site; at 35-37 weeks, maternal height (OR: 0.41; 95% CI: 0.20-0.87 for upper tertile). Clinical characteristics independently associated with GDM/overt diabetes differed by OGTT time point (e.g. at ≤19 + 6 weeks, NC was associated with abnormal fasting but not postchallenge glucose).

Conclusion: In this population, most clinical characteristics associated with GDM/overt diabetes were non-modifiable and differed by pregnancy period and OGTT time point. The identified risk factors can help define the target population for future intervention trials.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1530/EJE-18-0003DOI Listing
July 2018

Determinants of preeclampsia in women with type 1 diabetes.

Acta Diabetol 2017 Dec 3;54(12):1115-1121. Epub 2017 Oct 3.

Division of Reproduction, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Gynecological Oncology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 33 Polna St, 60-535, Poznań, Poland.

Aims: Despite improvement in diabetic care over the years, the incidence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy is still very high. Therefore, the aim of our study was to determine risk factors for PE in women with T1DM.

Methods: This study was a prospective, nested case-control study on a population of 165 women with T1DM. Women were divided into 3 subgroups: normotensive (N = 141), gestational hypertension (GH) (N = 8), and PE (N = 16). Clinical data were collected in the first trimester (< 12th week), in mid-pregnancy (20-24th weeks), and just prior to delivery (34-39th weeks). IR in the first trimester was quantified using the estimated glucose disposal rate formula (eGDR, milligrams/kilogram/minute). Simple logistic regression was used to search for factors associated with PE and GH. For multivariate comparisons, we used multiple logistic regression with stepwise selection.

Results: All preeclampsia cases were diagnosed in primiparae. The presence of vasculopathy was the strongest determinant of PE (OR 10.8, 95% CI 3.27-35.97, P = 0.0001), followed by a history of chronic hypertension (6.05, 1.75-20.8, P = 0.004) and the duration of diabetes (1.11, 1.03-1.12, P = 0.009). However, chronic hypertension and duration of diabetes were no longer associated with PE after adjustment for the presence of vasculopathy. Higher gestational weight gain (GWG) was associated with PE, and this association remained significant after adjustment for first trimester body mass index (1.14, 1.02-1.28, P = 0.02). Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure assessed in the first trimester were significant determinants of PE; however, this association was no longer observed after adjustment for the presence of chronic hypertension. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA) levels from all 3 trimesters were significantly associated with PE (first trimester: 1.38, 1.01-1.87, P = 0.04; second trimester: 2.76, 1.43-5.31, P = 0.002; third trimester: 2.42, 1.30-4.51, P = 0.005). There was a negative association between eGDR and PE (0.66, 0.50-0.87, P = 0.003). Among lipids, triglycerides (TG) in all 3 trimesters were positively associated with PE, and this association was independent of HbA levels (first trimester: 5.32, 1.65-17.18, P = 0.005; second trimester: 2.52, 1.02-6.26, P = 0.05; third trimester: 2.28, 1.39-3.74, P = 0.001. We did not find any predictors of GH in the regression analysis among all analyzed factors.

Conclusions: Primiparity and diabetic vasculopathy seem to be the strongest risk factors for PE in women with type 1 diabetes. However, preexisting hypertension and higher GWG were also associated with PE in women with T1DM. Among laboratory results, higher HbA and TG levels in all 3 trimesters were associated with PE. The association between higher IR and PE in women with T1DM needs further study.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00592-017-1053-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5680366PMC
December 2017

Epidemiology of gestational diabetes mellitus according to IADPSG/WHO 2013 criteria among obese pregnant women in Europe.

Diabetologia 2017 10 12;60(10):1913-1921. Epub 2017 Jul 12.

Galway Diabetes Research Centre, College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, National University of Ireland, University Road, Galway, H91 TK33, Ireland.

Aims/hypothesis: Accurate prevalence estimates for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among pregnant women in Europe are lacking owing to the use of a multitude of diagnostic criteria and screening strategies in both high-risk women and the general pregnant population. Our aims were to report important risk factors for GDM development and calculate the prevalence of GDM in a cohort of women with BMI ≥29 kg/m across 11 centres in Europe using the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG)/WHO 2013 diagnostic criteria.

Methods: Pregnant women (n = 1023, 86.3% European ethnicity) with a BMI ≥29.0 kg/m enrolled into the Vitamin D and Lifestyle Intervention for GDM Prevention (DALI) pilot, lifestyle and vitamin D studies of this pan-European multicentre trial, attended for an OGTT during pregnancy. Demographic, anthropometric and metabolic data were collected at enrolment and throughout pregnancy. GDM was diagnosed using IADPSG/WHO 2013 criteria. GDM treatment followed local policies.

Results: The number of women recruited per country ranged from 80 to 217, and the dropout rate was 7.1%. Overall, 39% of women developed GDM during pregnancy, with no significant differences in prevalence across countries. The prevalence of GDM was high (24%; 242/1023) in early pregnancy. Despite interventions used in the DALI study, a further 14% (94/672) had developed GDM when tested at mid gestation (24-28 weeks) and 13% (59/476) of the remaining cohort at late gestation (35-37 weeks). Demographics and lifestyle factors were similar at baseline between women with GDM and those who maintained normal glucose tolerance. Previous GDM (16.5% vs 7.9%, p = 0.002), congenital malformations (6.4% vs 3.3%, p = 0.045) and a baby with macrosomia (31.4% vs 17.9%, p = 0.001) were reported more frequently in those who developed GDM. Significant anthropometric and metabolic differences were already present in early pregnancy between women who developed GDM and those who did not.

Conclusions/interpretation: The prevalence of GDM diagnosed by the IADPSG/WHO 2013 GDM criteria in European pregnant women with a BMI ≥29.0 kg/m is substantial, and poses a significant health burden to these pregnancies and to the future health of the mother and her offspring. Uniform criteria for GDM diagnosis, supported by robust evidence for the benefits of treatment, are urgently needed to guide modern GDM screening and treatment strategies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00125-017-4353-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448875PMC
October 2017

Multiple daily injections of insulin versus continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion for pregnant women with type 1 diabetes.

Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol 2013 Apr 15;53(2):130-5. Epub 2013 Jan 15.

Department of Obstetrics and Women Diseases, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland.

Aims: The aim was to evaluate the outcome of pregnancies with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) treated from the first trimester with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) or multiple daily injections (MDI).

Methods: In a retrospective, observational study, we matched 64 CSII patients for age, age at onset and duration of diabetes and HbA1c in the first trimester with 64 MDI pregnancies. We analysed carbohydrate metabolism, insulin requirements, development of PIH, progression of retinopathy and fetal outcome.

Results: In CSII group, we found a significantly smaller insulin requirement both at the beginning of pregnancy and before delivery, significant decrease in HbA1c levels and significantly smaller number of hypoglycaemic episodes in the second trimester and significantly more hyperglycaemic episodes in the first trimester. In both groups, maternal, fetal and perinatal outcomes were similar and the number of hypo- and hyperglycaemic episodes decreased throughout pregnancy.

Conclusion: Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) treatment in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes is associated with a reduced number of hypoglycaemia and decreased insulin requirement. We noted no difference in perinatal outcome comparing women on multiple insulin injections with those on continuous insulin infusion.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajo.12027DOI Listing
April 2013

[Maternal body mass index and gestational weight gain and their association with perinatal outcome in women with gestational diabetes].

Ginekol Pol 2011 Nov;82(11):827-33

Klinika Połoznictwa i Chorób Kobiecych, Katedra Ginekologii, Poloinictwa i Onkologii Ginekologicznej, Uniwersytet Medyczny im. K. Marcinkowskiego, Poznań, Polska.

Objectives: Maternal overweight and obesity constitute the most important factors causing perinatal complications. The purpose of the study was to analyze obstetrical results in overweight/obese pregnant women with gestational diabetes in relation to Institute of Health recommendations concerning gestational weight gain and assessment of the role of prepregnancy BMI in prediction of macrosomia, pregnancy induced hypertension and cesarean deliveries.

Material And Methods: Retrospective analysis of 209 overweight and obese pregnant women with gestational diabetes divided into 4 subgroups according to The National Institute of Health (USA) recommendations. The following data were included in the analysis: gestational week in which GDM was diagnosed; HbA1c level in the first and third trimester just before delivery; incidence of pregnancy induced hypertension; incidence of cesarean deliveries; incidence of macrosomia. The following data of II, III, IV subgroups were compared to these found in I subgroup which was classified as the control group. Selected obstetric parameters were also compared between subgroups II, III, IV RESULTS: The selected parameters of subgroups II, III, IV were not significantly different from these of subgroup I. Pregnancy induced hypertension was diagnosed more frequently among subgroup II in comparison to subgroup III. Using ROC curves analysis, the role of pre-pregnancy BMI was found in the prognosis of: birth weight greater than 4300 g, pregnancy induced hypertension, cesarean delivery

Conclusions: 1. The application of the National Institute of Health recommendations on gestational weight gain is limited in case of overweight or obese pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus. 2. Excessive weight gain during pregnancy according to National Health Institute recommendations may increase the risk of developing pregnancy induced hypertension in comparison to a pregnant women with weight gain less than recommended, but greater than zero. 3. Increased prepregnancy BMI has a role in prediction of birth weight greater than 4300 g, pregnancy induced hypertension, cesarean delivery
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2011