Publications by authors named "Umberto M Bracale"

21 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The use of the Amplatzer Vascular Plug in the prevention of endoleaks during abdominal endovascular aneurysm repair: A systematic literature review on current applications.

Vascular 2021 Jun 14:17085381211025152. Epub 2021 Jun 14.

Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, 9325University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy.

Objectives: The Amplatzer Vascular Plug (AVP) is a vascular occlusion device designed to provide optimal embolization in several fields of the endovascular surgery. A full literature review was conducted to analyze AVPs in comparison with coils for the prevention of endoleaks during endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

Methods: A systematic review was designed under PRISMA statement guidelines for systematic reviews and meta-analyses. The results were updated with a subsequent electronic search using Medline and Scopus databases up to December 2019.

Results: Eighteen articles making this comparison were found. In 79.7% of the cases, the target vessel was the internal iliac artery; in 1.6%, the common iliac artery; and in 16.7%, the inferior mesenteric artery. Risk of complications (buttock claudication, groin hematoma, endoleaks, and erectile dysfunction) after AVP was low. A cost comparison revealed that the mean cost for coils was around US$2262, while the average cost for the AVP was US$310.

Conclusions: The AVP is an effective and safe device for occluding peripheral vessels, proved to have lower complications rates. Compared with coil embolization, the AVP technique is potentially associated with lower procedural costs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/17085381211025152DOI Listing
June 2021

Novel biomarkers in cardiovascular surgery.

Biomark Med 2021 Mar 16;15(4):307-318. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Department of Experimental & Clinical Medicine, University of Catanzaro, Italy.

Cardiovascular disease includes health problems related to the heart, arteries and veins and is a significant healthcare problem worldwide. Cardiovascular disease may be acute or chronic and relapses are frequent. Biomarkers involved in this field may help clinicians and surgeons in diagnosis and adequate decision making. Relevant articles searched in the following databases Medline, Scopus, ScienceDirect, were retrieved and analysed. Several biomarkers have been identified and we analyzed those of most importance from a clinical and surgical point of view. Biomarkers can better identify high-risk individuals, facilitate follow-up process, provide information regarding prognosis and better tailor the most appropriate surgical treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/bmm-2020-0480DOI Listing
March 2021

Single staged hybrid approach for multilevel aortic-iliac-femoral-popliteal disease.

Int J Surg Case Rep 2020 22;77S:S166-S169. Epub 2020 Sep 22.

Vascular Surgery Unit - AOUP Policlinico 'P. Giaccone', Palermo, Italy; Department of Surgical, Oncological and Oral Sciences, University of Palermo, Italy.

Introduction: Multilevel peripheral arterial disease (MPAD) is the main cause of critic limb ischemia (CLI). Vascular interventions are required to increase distal blood flow and reduce the risk of lower limb amputation.

Presentation Of Case: We report a case of complex hybrid revascularization in a patient presenting a Rutherford V MPAD involving the infrarenal aorta, iliac, femoral and popliteal segments. The simultaneous hybrid intervention consisted of an endovascular aortic stent-graft placement and a surgical above-the-knee prosthetic femoro-popliteal bypass. In the same operation a renal stenting was performed due to a significant renal artery stenosis associated to a systemic hypertension non-responder to medical management.

Discussion: Hybrid interventions can be performed simultaneously or staged with benefit given by the complementary role of endovascular and surgical treatments allowing the correction of eventually inadequate results of both approaches. Reports of simultaneous hybrid treatments are limited but, despite the complexity of such procedures, primary success rate is reported high. Also in the reported case, a complex simultaneous treatment in a patient presenting MPAD in association to a significant and symptomatic renal artery disease was feasible in the same operation.

Conclusion: Hybrid procedure are safe with high degree of efficacy in terms of revascularization procedure, reduced morbidity and shorter intensive care and hospital stay. In our experience, the use of hybrid procedure is technically feasible and allowed the treatment of MPAD with a good outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijscr.2020.09.018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7876840PMC
September 2020

PredyCLU: A prediction system for chronic leg ulcers based on fuzzy logic; part II-Exploring the arterial side.

Int Wound J 2020 Aug 13;17(4):987-991. Epub 2020 Apr 13.

Interuniversity Center of Phlebolymphology (CIFL), International Research and Educational Program in Clinical and Experimental Biotechnology", Catanzaro, Italy.

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and its most severe form, critical limb ischaemia (CLI), are very common clinical conditions related to atherosclerosis and represent the major causes of morbidity, mortality, disability, and reduced quality of life (QoL), especially for the onset of ischaemic chronic leg ulcers (ICLUs) and the subsequent need of amputation in affected patients. Early identification of patients at risk of developing ICLUs may represent the best form of prevention and appropriate management. In this study, we used a Prediction System for Chronic Leg Ulcers (PredyCLU) based on fuzzy logic applied to patients with PAD. The patient population consisted of 80 patients with PAD, of which 40 patients (30 males [75%] and 10 females [25%]; mean age 66.18 years; median age 67.50 years) had ICLUs and represented the case group. Forty patients (100%) (27 males [67.50%] and 13 females [32.50%]; mean age 66.43 years; median age 66.50 years) did not have ICLUs and represented the control group. In patients of the case group, the higher was the risk calculated with the PredyCLU the more severe were the clinical manifestations recorded. In this study, the PredyCLU algorithm was retrospectively applied on a multicentre population of 80 patients with PAD. The PredyCLU algorithm provided a reliable risk score for the risk of ICLUs in patients with PAD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/iwj.13360DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7948557PMC
August 2020

Single-Center Experience and Preliminary Results of Intravascular Ultrasound in Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

Ann Vasc Surg 2019 Apr 27;56:209-215. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

Department of Surgical Oncological and Oral Sciences (DICHIRONS), University of Palermo, Vascular Surgery Unit, Palermo, Italy.

Background: Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) has been introduced as diagnostic adjunct to provide new insights into the diagnosis and therapy of vascular disease. Herein, we compared the outcomes of conventional endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and EVAR with IVUS in patients presenting with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm using a propensity-matched cohort.

Methods: From May 2013 to August 2017, 221 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Of that, 122 patients were eligible for inclusion and underwent propensity score matching. Perioperative mortality and morbidity, renal function impairment, endoleak incidence, mean contrast medium usage, operative time, radiation exposure (including fluoroscopy time, dose-area product [DAP], and digital subtraction angiography [DSA] runs), survival, and freedom from reintervention were the outcomes measured.

Results: After matching, 52 patients were included, 26 in the conventional EVAR group and 26 in the EVAR with IVUS group. No perioperative mortality or type I/III endoleak were registered. One perioperative lymphatic fistula and one iliac limb occlusion were observed. In the EVAR with IVUS group, a significant reduction of contrast medium (92 [vs. 51 ± 17] vs. 51 [20-68] mL; P = 0.003) and radiation exposure including fluoroscopy time (12 [9-16] vs. 20 [12-25] min; P = 0.001), DAP (15 [9-21] vs. 32 [16-44] G*cm; P = 0.002), and DSA runs (2 [1-3] vs. 3 [2-4]; P = 0.04) was reported. No differences were observed in terms of glomerular filtration rate (86 [45-121] vs. 90 [38-117] mL/min; P = 0.14) and operation time (176 [124-210] vs. 179 [120-210]; P = 0.48). Survival at 36 months was 93% for standard EVAR and 92% for EVAR with IVUS (P = 0.845). Freedom from reintervention at 36 months was 85.5% in both the groups (P = 0.834).

Conclusions: In this preliminary experience, the use of IVUS during EVAR was feasible with no registered postoperative complications. A significant reduction of contrast medium usage and radiation exposure was observed with the use of IVUS. The IVUS is an adjunctive tool to consider in the vascular surgeon armamentarium, especially in centers where advanced radiological tools of imaging fusion are not available.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.avsg.2018.09.016DOI Listing
April 2019

Predictive factors for anastomotic leakage after laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

World J Gastroenterol 2018 Jun;24(21):2247-2260

Department of Gastroenterology, Endocrinology and Endoscopic Surgery, University Hospital of Naples Federico II, Naples 80131, Italy.

Every colorectal surgeon during his or her career is faced with anastomotic leakage (AL); one of the most dreaded complications following any type of gastrointestinal anastomosis due to increased risk of morbidity, mortality, overall impact on functional and oncologic outcome and drainage on hospital resources. In order to understand and give an overview of the AL risk factors in laparoscopic colorectal surgery, we carried out a careful review of the existing literature on this topic and found several different definitions of AL which leads us to believe that the lack of a consensual, standard definition can partly explain the considerable variations in reported rates of AL in clinical studies. Colorectal leak rates have been found to vary depending on the anatomic location of the anastomosis with reported incidence rates ranging from 0 to 20%, while the laparoscopic approach to colorectal resections has not yet been associated with a significant reduction in AL incidence. As well, numerous risk factors, though identified, lack unanimous recognition amongst researchers. For example, the majority of papers describe the risk factors for left-sided anastomosis, the principal risk being male sex and lower anastomosis, while little data exists defining AL risk factors in a right colectomy. Also, gut microbioma is gaining an emerging role as potential risk factor for leakage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v24.i21.2247DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5989239PMC
June 2018

Symptomatic Deep Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm Endovascular Exclusion. Case Report and Literature Review.

Ann Vasc Surg 2017 Jul 5;42:303.e5-303.e9. Epub 2017 Apr 5.

Vascular Surgery Unit, University of Palermo, AOUP "P. Giaccone", Palermo, Italy.

Deep femoral artery pseudoaneurysms (DFAPs) are rare and generally occur after penetrating trauma or surgical procedures. A 36-year-old obese man presented with pain in correspondence of the anterior-lateral thigh after 6 months from gunshot wound. Duplex and computed tomography (CT) showed a bilobed right DFAP (maximal diameter 12.9 cm). The patient was managed urgently, under local anesthesia, by placement in the distal DFA of a Viabahn 8 × 100-mm stent graft (W L Gore & Associates, Inc). The postoperative course was uneventful, and the 24-month CT showed regular stent-graft patency and 20-mm DFAP shrinkage. The literature review reported 8 cases of DFAPs; of these 6 were managed by endovascular mean (3 stent-graft implantations and 3 coil embolization). The remaining 2 cases were managed surgically (one of these after failed coil embolization). In conclusion, the use of covered stent graft was effective to treat a DFAP localized in the medium DFA. This tool allowed maintaining the native DFA patency and the preservation of its main branches.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.avsg.2016.11.026DOI Listing
July 2017

Early experience with a modified preloaded system for fenestrated endovascular aortic repair.

J Vasc Surg 2017 Apr;65(4):972-980

Aortic Team, Royal Free London National Health Service Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Objective: Preloaded endovascular delivery systems expand the anatomic eligibility for complex aortic repair by requiring only one iliac access vessel and providing a stable platform for guiding sheaths into challenging target vessels. This article reports the lessons learned and early clinical outcomes using a modified preloaded delivery system for fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (FEVAR) in three aortic centers in Europe.

Methods: From October 2015 to March 2016, consecutive patients presenting with extensive aortic aneurysm treated with a modified preloaded FEVAR were prospectively enrolled from three high volume European aortic centers. The new design is a modification of previous designs of preloaded fenestrated stent grafts and of the p-branch device platform. The technical details of implantation are described and perioperative outcomes, including the learning curve, are collected and reported.

Results: All patients (30 patients; 80% men; 70.2 years old) presented for nonurgent repair of either a type Ia endoleak (3/30; 10%), a type I-II-III thoracoabdominal (8/30; 27%), or a type IV thoracoabdominal or pararenal (19/30; 63.%) aneurysm repair of a mean size of 64 ± 13 mm using a custom made device. Primary technical success was achieved in 28 of 30 patients (93%) and assisted primary technical success in 29 of 30 patients (97%). The two technical failures included open conversion to repair a ruptured iliac artery and restenting of a dissected superior mesenteric artery which was recognized hours after the index procedure had finished. The mean procedure time was 277 ± 153 minutes, fluoroscopy time 79 ± 36 minutes, dose area product 112 ± 90 Gy cm, and contrast volume 87 ± 46 mL. All renal fenestrations were successfully stented without type III endoleak on completion angiogram; the preloaded guiding sheaths were used for 53 of 58 renal arteries (91%). Challenges related to learning to the use of the modified preloaded system were experienced early and had no clinical consequences. Major complications occurred in seven cases (23%), including two perioperative deaths because of stroke and sepsis following primary conversion attributable to iliac rupture. There were no target vessel occlusions or type I/III endoleaks found on postoperative imaging.

Conclusions: Based on early experience, the modified preloaded system can be safely and effectively used during FEVAR, with good technical result and a short period of learning. This device expands treatment to patients with compromised iliac access, thus, additional patients and more follow-up will be required to determine unique risks of operating in this patient population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2016.09.045DOI Listing
April 2017

Extra-anatomic iliac to superior mesenteric artery bypass after bridge endovascular treatment for chronic mesenteric ischemia. A case report.

Ann Ital Chir 2015 Jul 3;86(ePub). Epub 2015 Jul 3.

Unlabelled: A 60 year old patient presenting chronic mesenteric Ischemia (CMI) was managed with superior mesenteric artery (SMA) stenting as bridge therapy to conventional open surgery. At 5 months follow-up, the SMA stent occluded. During this bridge period the patient gained his general condition and the body mass index (BMI) increased from 18 to 22. The patient was managed subsequently with iliac-SMA bypass in C-loop configuration. At 6 months follow-up the bypass is patent, the patient has no CMI symptoms and his BMI is 25. The endovascular approach did not preclude a subsequent conventional open surgery and it can be safely employed as bridge therapy. An improved patient clinical condition, also during a limited bridge period, can improve the conventional open surgery outcomes.

Key Words: Body Mass Index(BMI), Mesenteric artery, Mesenteric ischemia.
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July 2015

Practical points of attention beyond instructions for use with the Zenith fenestrated stent graft.

J Vasc Surg 2014 Jul 14;60(1):246-52. Epub 2014 Mar 14.

Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery and Department of Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

Fenestrated stent grafting for endovascular repair (F-EVAR) aims to treat patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms that are unsuitable for standard EVAR because of a short or absent infrarenal neck. F-EVAR has been used initially in patients with higher surgical risk with pararenal abdominal aortic aneurysms, but F-EVAR is now increasingly considered a treatment alternative to open surgery in anatomically suitable patients. F-EVAR has benefitted from ongoing technical refinements and accumulating clinical experience but remains a relatively complex procedure. Correct indication, accurate preoperative planning, and meticulous execution are the key to long-term success. Considering the growing interest in F-EVAR worldwide, including the United States, we discuss current indications and provide advice for planning and technical execution on the basis of the senior authors' 13 years of experience.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2014.01.065DOI Listing
July 2014

Kidney transplantation and large anastomotic pseudoaneurysm. Transplant management considerations.

Ann Ital Chir 2013 May-Jun;84(3):275-9

Aim: Pseudoaneurysm (PA) at the anastomosis site in kidney transplantation is a rare but serious complication that usually requires graft nephrectomy. Literature reports are sporadic and usually focused on limb rather than graft salvage. In this paper we focus on this last point.

Material Of Study: 6 patients presenting large PA at the anastomosis between iliac and graft artery were identified in our series. The diagnosis was performed with US, AngioTC scan and angiography. Blood cultures and labeled leukocyte scintigraphy were also performed. All patients underwent open surgery.

Results: Transplant nephrectomy was needed in all cases except one, in which it was possible to perform a graft replanting on hypogastric artery. Our perioperative mortality and morbidity rate was recorded.

Discussion: Etiology of PA is multifactorial, however an association with chronic rejection or infection must be also considered. Our mortality and morbidity rates are in accordance to literature. In our experience we observed only large PA so to require an open surgery but this approach has allowed the rescue of graft functioning just in a single case. Endovascular procedures are linked to higher rate of graft salvage than surgery but they can be used just in selected cases.

Conclusions: Our experience and literature review led us to believe that the rate of graft salvage in patients with large PA at anastomosis site could be improved only by a planned therapeutic program that includes surgical and endovascular approach, taking the advantages of both technique and overcoming their limits.
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June 2014

Proximal type I endoleak after previous EVAR with Palmaz stents crossing the renal arteries: treatment using a fenestrated cuff.

J Endovasc Ther 2012 Oct;19(5):672-6

Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Klinikum Nürnberg Süd, Germany.

Purpose: To report the use of a fenestrated cuff for endovascular treatment of a proximal type I endoleak after previous endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) that included 2 suprarenal cuffs and 2 Palmaz stents.

Case Report: A 71-year-old man had been treated for an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm with a Powerlink stent-graft, 2 additional proximal cuffs with suprarenal fixation, and 2 Palmaz stents extending over the renal arteries. Follow-up demonstrated a type I endoleak and an increase in aneurysm size. A 2-stage endovascular approach featuring a fenestrated cuff was undertaken. Prior to the endoleak repair procedure, both renal arteries were catheterized and the Palmaz stent struts dilated. When the customized fenestrated cuff was available, it was successfully positioned with covered stents in the fenestrations, completely excluding the proximal type I endoleak.

Conclusion: Fenestrated stent-grafting is a viable alternative to open repair after failed EVAR, even when previously implanted bare metal stents cross the renal orifices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1583/JEVT-12-3901R.1DOI Listing
October 2012

Unexpected complication with the new C3 excluder: cause and treatment.

Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol 2013 Apr 9;36(2):536-9. Epub 2012 May 9.

Department of Vascular Surgery, Klinikum Nürnberg Süd, Breslauer Strasse 201, 90471, Nuremberg, Germany.

The new C3 Gore Excluder delivery system enables both up/downward and rotational repositioning of the device before complete deployment. This contributes to more precise proximal landing and permits facilitation of the contralateral gate cannulation. During separate deployment, the position of the ipsilateral limb can also be readjusted. We have used the modified C3 delivery system in more than 50 patients, and in most cases, we were able to utilize the repositioning options of the device to achieve optimal fixation and sealing. However, we present a case where our attempt to readjust the position of the ipsilateral limb led to upward migration of the main body with coverage of the left renal artery origin. The latter was secured with a bare stent implantation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00270-012-0411-3DOI Listing
April 2013

Late carotid artery stent erosion and pseudoaneurysm after accidental hyperextension of the neck.

J Vasc Surg 2012 Jan;55(1):242

Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2011.09.009DOI Listing
January 2012

Contrast-induced nephropathy after percutaneous coronary intervention in simple lesions: risk factors and incidence are affected by the definition utilized.

Intern Med 2011 1;50(9):983-9. Epub 2011 May 1.

Cardiology Unit, University of Palermo, Italy.

Aim: To compare the incidence, and risk factors, in-hospital and at the 18-month prognosis of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) according to the definition utilized: as an increase in serum creatinine (Scr) ≥ 0.5 mg/dL (CIN 1) or as an increase in Scr ≥ 25% above baseline values (CIN 2).

Methods And Results: We prospectively evaluated CIN according to two different definitions in 150 patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in simple lesions employing a low-medium dose of contrast media. Incidence of CIN was higher using the CIN 2 definition than CIN 1 (9.3% vs. 4%; p=0.0133). Patients with CIN 1 had a higher incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) (66.7% vs. 13.9%; p=0.006), higher mean serum creatinine levels (1.35±0.42 vs. 0.98±0.35; p=0.001) and lower mean eGFR levels (58.3±19.6 vs. 84±25.9; p=0.002). Patients with CIN 2 had a higher incidence of anemia (57.1% vs. 30.9%; p=0.049) and a higher mean contrast media volume was used (142.6±62.2 mL vs. 110.6±57.2 mL; p=0.05). In the multivariate analysis the only significant variable associated with CIN (CIN 2) was a higher volume of contrast media (OR=1.01; p=0.04). There were no differences in the major in-hospital events, but patients with CIN (both definitions) had a longer in-hospital stay. A persistent rise in serum creatinine at discharge occurred in only one patient. There were no differences between patients with and without CIN in events at the follow-up, with the exception of an increased risk of new hospitalization in patients with CIN 2.

Conclusion: After PCI employing low-medium dose of contrast media the incidence of CIN varied according to the definition used. Neither of the two definitions offers additional information compared with the other. Chronic kidney disease and baseline parameters of renal function are the risk factors associated with CIN 1; anemia and higher volume of contrast media are associated with CIN 2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2169/internalmedicine.50.4976DOI Listing
August 2011

Chest pain due to late huge coronary pseudoaneurysm following stent implantation.

Intern Med 2011 15;50(6):577-9. Epub 2011 Mar 15.

Cardiology Unit, University of Palermo, Italy.

A 50-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of persistent atypical chest pain. His past medical history was remarkable for a non ST elevation myocardial infarction, treated five months previously with PCI on the right coronary artery. Two months later, for chest pain, he underwent coronary angiography that showed a right coronary artery with slight ectasia near the stent. Five months later for the persistence of atypical chest pain he came to our clinic. Chest CT showed a 31.5 mm hematoma of the right coronary artery. Coronary angiography revealed a giant aneurysm, proximal to the stent. In the light of rapid growth of aneurysm, the risk of rupture and symptoms, we decided to treat the aneurysm with covered stents. The patient underwent successful PCI with regression of symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2169/internalmedicine.50.4566DOI Listing
February 2012

Carotid artery stenting with contralateral carotid occlusion in a rare aortic arch configuration.

J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) 2010 Aug;11(8):628-30

Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Unit, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.

We present the case of a 47-year-old man admitted to our department with an episode of aphasia. Duplex scan showed an occluded right internal carotid artery and severe left internal carotid artery stenosis. Contrast-enhanced computer tomography demonstrated a common trunk for both common carotid arteries anterior to the trachea and aberrant right subclavian artery posterior to the esophagus. The patient was considered to be a high risk for carotid endarterectomy and, consequently, we performed stenting of the left carotid artery. To our knowledge, this is the first case reporting the combination of these two aortic arch anomalies and the concomitant endovascular treatment of atherosclerotic carotid stenosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2459/JCM.0b013e328336b56aDOI Listing
August 2010

Hybrid endograft solution for complex iliac anatomy: Zenith body and Excluder limbs.

Vascular 2010 May-Jun;18(3):136-40

Department of Sugery, University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands.

The purpose of this study was to evaluate single-center results with selective use of Gore Excluder limbs (W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) in a Cook Zenith body (Cook Inc, Bloomington, IN) for elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. A prospectively held database for patients with AAA, who were treated endovascularly between March 1999 and July 2008, was queried for patients treated with a Cook Zenith body and one or two Gore Excluder limbs. Indication, technical success, late limb occlusion, and disconnection were evaluated. From 276 patients who were treated with a Zenith body, 29 underwent repair with hybrid graft components with, in total, 41 Gore Excluder limbs. The indication was always complex iliac anatomy. The primary technical success rate in this group was 89% (26 of 29 patients), with a primary assisted technical success rate of 100%. Mortality at 30 days was 0%. The mean follow-up was 19.4 months (range 2-64 months). Late mortality was 13.8% (4 of 29), with no aneurysm-related death. No graft limb occlusion or disconnection occurred during follow-up. No reintervention was needed in the hybrid endograft group. The use of a Cook Zenith body with Gore Excluder limb(s) in case of adverse iliac anatomy is feasible and showed no adverse effects at the midterm follow-up.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2310/6670.2010.00034DOI Listing
July 2010

External iliac artery pseudoaneurysm complicating renal transplantation.

Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg 2009 Jun 16;8(6):654-60. Epub 2009 Mar 16.

Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, University Federico II, Naples, Italy.

Objectives: To assess the etiology, management and outcome of iliac pseudoaneurysms following renal transplantation.

Methods: Eleven patients who underwent repair between 1982 and 2007 were identified. Five (Group 1) presented pseudoaneurysm at the anastomosis of the donor renal and native iliac arteries, and six (Group 2) presented iliac pseudoaneurysm following transplant nephrectomy. Intraoperative cultures and immunohistochemical examinations were obtained from all surgical cases to determine the existence of a relationship between infection or transplant rejection and pseudoaneurysm formation.

Results: Endovascular repair (EVR) was used to treat three patients, while eight patients underwent open repair (OR). Transplant nephrectomy was needed in all cases but one after anastomotic pseudoaneurysm repair. After pseudoaneurysm excision, arterial reconstruction was performed in all cases, with a limb salvage rate of 100%. At 30 days, no patients died in the EVR subgroup. In the OR subgroup, one patient died of sepsis (12.5%). Cultures taken from the pseudoaneurysm wall and content grew Candida albicans and E. coli in two febrile patients. Pathologic evaluation of donor renal arteries revealed evidence of chronic rejection in three patients (60%) in Group 1, and in two (33.3%) in Group 2. No patients in either Group presented late infection, failure of vascular reconstruction nor pseudoaneurysm recurrence. The follow-up ranges from 20 to 89 months.

Conclusions: The etiology of pseudoaneurysms in this location is multifactorial, however, an association with chronic rejection must be considered. Though rare, the development of pseudoaneurysms at the donor renal-external iliac artery anastomosis results in high rates of transplant nephrectomy. Less invasive endovascular techniques offer a new therapeutic option in this challenging scenario notwithstanding the fact that they require further validation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1510/icvts.2008.200386DOI Listing
June 2009

Renewed endovascular repair for recurrent acute abdominal aortic aneurysm.

Emerg Radiol 2009 May 15;16(3):239-42. Epub 2008 May 15.

Department of Surgery, Division of Vascular Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

The aim of the study was to describe the successful endovascular management of a patient who was admitted urgently with a second episode of acute abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) 30 months after emergency endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (eEVAR) for a ruptured AAA. The patient, an 84 year-old male physician, presented with severe acute abdominal and back pain. Contrast-enhanced computer tomography scanning showed type III endoleak owing to complete disconnection of both graft limbs and the prosthetic main body. Treatment consisted of acute stent-grafting with two bridging stent-grafts to seal the endoleak and reline the graft. The patient is alive and well 6 months postoperatively. This case indicates the need for follow-up after eEVAR, but also that complications can be managed endovascularly.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10140-008-0721-6DOI Listing
May 2009
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