Publications by authors named "Ulrike Peters"

351 Publications

Esophageal cancer mutational signatures around the world.

Nat Genet 2021 Oct 21. Epub 2021 Oct 21.

Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-021-00958-0DOI Listing
October 2021

Genetic discovery and risk characterization in type 2 diabetes across diverse populations.

HGG Adv 2021 Apr 9;2(2). Epub 2021 Mar 9.

Division of Statistical Genomics, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA.

Genomic discovery and characterization of risk loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been conducted primarily in individuals of European ancestry. We conducted a multiethnic genome-wide association study of T2D among 53,102 cases and 193,679 control subjects from African, Hispanic, Asian, Native Hawaiian, and European population groups in the Population Architecture Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) and Diabetes Genetics Replication and Meta-analysis (DIAGRAM) Consortia. In individuals of African ancestry, we discovered a risk variant in the gene (rs11466334, risk allele frequency (RAF) = 6.8%, odds ratio [OR] = 1.27, p = 2.06 × 10), which replicated in independent studies of African ancestry (p = 6.26 × 10). We identified a multiethnic risk variant in the gene (rs13052926, RAF = 14.1%, OR = 1.08, p = 5.75 × 10), which also replicated in independent studies (p = 3.45 × 10). We also observed a significant difference in the performance of a multiethnic genetic risk score (GRS) across population groups (p = 3.85 × 10). Comparing individuals in the top GRS risk category (40%-60%), the OR was highest in Asians (OR = 3.08) and European (OR = 2.94) ancestry populations, followed by Hispanic (OR = 2.39), Native Hawaiian (OR = 2.02), and African ancestry (OR = 1.57) populations. These findings underscore the importance of genetic discovery and risk characterization in diverse populations and the urgent need to further increase representation of non-European ancestry individuals in genetics research to improve genetic-based risk prediction across populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.xhgg.2021.100029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8486151PMC
April 2021

Novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying risk of colorectal cancer from smoking and red/processed meat carcinogens by modeling exposure in normal colon organoids.

Oncotarget 2021 Sep 14;12(19):1863-1877. Epub 2021 Sep 14.

Center for Public Health Genomics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.

Tobacco smoke and red/processed meats are well-known risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC). Most research has focused on studies of normal colon biopsies in epidemiologic studies or treatment of CRC cell lines . These studies are often constrained by challenges with accuracy of self-report data or, in the case of CRC cell lines, small sample sizes and lack of relationship to normal tissue at risk. In an attempt to address some of these limitations, we performed a 24-hour treatment of a representative carcinogens cocktail in 37 independent organoid lines derived from normal colon biopsies. Machine learning algorithms were applied to bulk RNA-sequencing and revealed cellular composition changes in colon organoids. We identified 738 differentially expressed genes in response to carcinogens exposure. Network analysis identified significantly different modules of co-expression, that included genes related to MSI-H tumor biology, and genes previously implicated in CRC through genome-wide association studies. Our study helps to better define the molecular effects of representative carcinogens from smoking and red/processed meat in normal colon epithelial cells and in the etiology of the MSI-H subtype of CRC, and suggests an overlap between molecular mechanisms involved in inherited and environmental CRC risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.28058DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8448508PMC
September 2021

Bacterial translocation and microgap formation at a novel conical indexed implant abutment system for single crowns.

Clin Oral Investig 2021 Aug 16. Epub 2021 Aug 16.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20251Hamburg, Germany.

Objectives: A conometric concept was recently introduced in which conical implant abutments hold the matching crown copings by friction alone, eliminating the need for cement or screws. The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the presence of microgap formation and bacterial leakage at the Acuris conometric restorative interface of three different implant abutment systems.

Material And Methods: A total of 75 Acuris samples of three implant-abutment systems (Ankylos, Astra Tech EV, Xive) were subjected to microbiological (n = 60) and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) investigation (n = 15). Bacterial migration into and out of the conical coupling system were analyzed in an anaerobic workstation for 48, 96, 144, and 192 h. Bacterial DNA quantification using qrt-PCR was performed at each time point. The precision of the conometric coupling and internal fit of cemented CAD/CAM crowns on corresponding Acuris TiN copings were determined by means of SEM.

Results: qrt-PCR results failed to demonstrate microbial leakage from or into the Acuris system. SEM analysis revealed minute punctate microgaps at the apical aspect of the conometric junction (2.04 to 2.64 µm), while mean cement gaps of 12 to 145 µm were observed at the crown-coping interface.

Conclusions: The prosthetic morse taper connection of all systems examined does not allow bacterial passage. Marginal integrity and internal luting gap between the ceramic crown and the coping remained within the clinically acceptable limits.

Clinical Relevance: Conometrically seated single crowns provide sufficient sealing efficiency, relocating potential misfits from the crown-abutment interface to the crown-coping interface.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-021-04112-2DOI Listing
August 2021

Transcriptome-wide Effects of Aspirin on Patient-derived Normal Colon Organoids.

Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 2021 Aug 13. Epub 2021 Aug 13.

Center for Public Health Genomics, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia.

Mechanisms underlying aspirin chemoprevention of colorectal cancer remain unclear. Prior studies have been limited because of the inability of preclinical models to recapitulate human normal colon epithelium or cellular heterogeneity present in mucosal biopsies. To overcome some of these obstacles, we performed aspirin treatment of colon organoids derived from normal mucosal biopsies to reveal transcriptional networks relevant to aspirin chemoprevention. Colon organoids derived from 38 healthy individuals undergoing endoscopy were treated with 50 μmol/L aspirin or vehicle control for 72 hours and subjected to bulk RNA sequencing. Paired regression analysis using DESeq2 identified differentially expressed genes (DEG) associated with aspirin treatment. Cellular composition was determined using CIBERSORTx. Aspirin treatment was associated with 1,154 significant ( < 0.10) DEGs prior to deconvolution. We provide replication of these findings in an independent population-based RNA-sequencing dataset of mucosal biopsies (BarcUVa-Seq), where a significant enrichment for overlap of DEGs was observed ( < 2.2E). Single-cell deconvolution revealed changes in cell composition, including a decrease in transit-amplifying cells following aspirin treatment ( = 0.01). Following deconvolution, DEGs included novel putative targets for aspirin such as ( = 0.055), a negative regulator of Wnt signaling. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis identified 12 significant modules, including two that contained hubs for and , the latter being previously implicated in aspirin chemoprevention. In summary, aspirin treatment of patient-derived colon organoids using physiologically relevant doses resulted in transcriptome-wide changes that reveal altered cell composition and improved understanding of transcriptional pathways, providing novel insight into its chemopreventive properties. PREVENTION RELEVANCE: Numerous studies have highlighted a role for aspirin in colorectal cancer chemoprevention, though the mechanisms driving this association remain unclear. We addressed this by showing that aspirin treatment of normal colon organoids diminished the transit-amplifying cell population, inhibited prostaglandin synthesis, and dysregulated expression of novel genes implicated in colon tumorigenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-21-0041DOI Listing
August 2021

Association Between Smoking and Molecular Subtypes of Colorectal Cancer.

JNCI Cancer Spectr 2021 Aug 14;5(4):pkab056. Epub 2021 Jun 14.

Departments of Cancer Biology and Genetics and Internal Medicine, Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.

Background: Smoking is associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Previous studies suggested this association may be restricted to certain molecular subtypes of CRC, but large-scale comprehensive analysis is lacking.

Methods: A total of 9789 CRC cases and 11 231 controls of European ancestry from 11 observational studies were included. We harmonized smoking variables across studies and derived sex study-specific quartiles of pack-years of smoking for analysis. Four somatic colorectal tumor markers were assessed individually and in combination, including mutation, mutation, CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), and microsatellite instability (MSI) status. A multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between smoking and risk of CRC subtypes by molecular characteristics, adjusting for age, sex, and study. All statistical tests were 2-sided and adjusted for Bonferroni correction.

Results: Heavier smoking was associated with higher risk of CRC overall and stratified by individual markers ( < .001). The associations differed statistically significantly between all molecular subtypes, which was the most statistically significant for CIMP and . Compared with never-smokers, smokers in the fourth quartile of pack-years had a 90% higher risk of CIMP-positive CRC (odds ratio = 1.90, 95% confidence interval = 1.60 to 2.26) but only 35% higher risk for CIMP-negative CRC (odds ratio = 1.35, 95% confidence interval = 1.22 to 1.49; = 2.1 x 10). The association was also stronger in tumors that were positive, MSI high, or wild type when combined ( < .001).

Conclusion: Smoking was associated with differential risk of CRC subtypes defined by molecular characteristics. Heavier smokers had particularly higher risk of CRC subtypes that were CIMP positive and MSI high in combination, suggesting that smoking may be involved in the development of colorectal tumors via the serrated pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jncics/pkab056DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8346704PMC
August 2021

Genetic insights into biological mechanisms governing human ovarian ageing.

Nature 2021 08 4;596(7872):393-397. Epub 2021 Aug 4.

Genome Integrity and Instability Group, Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain.

Reproductive longevity is essential for fertility and influences healthy ageing in women, but insights into its underlying biological mechanisms and treatments to preserve it are limited. Here we identify 290 genetic determinants of ovarian ageing, assessed using normal variation in age at natural menopause (ANM) in about 200,000 women of European ancestry. These common alleles were associated with clinical extremes of ANM; women in the top 1% of genetic susceptibility have an equivalent risk of premature ovarian insufficiency to those carrying monogenic FMR1 premutations. The identified loci implicate a broad range of DNA damage response (DDR) processes and include loss-of-function variants in key DDR-associated genes. Integration with experimental models demonstrates that these DDR processes act across the life-course to shape the ovarian reserve and its rate of depletion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that experimental manipulation of DDR pathways highlighted by human genetics increases fertility and extends reproductive life in mice. Causal inference analyses using the identified genetic variants indicate that extending reproductive life in women improves bone health and reduces risk of type 2 diabetes, but increases the risk of hormone-sensitive cancers. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms that govern ovarian ageing, when they act, and how they might be targeted by therapeutic approaches to extend fertility and prevent disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03779-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7611832PMC
August 2021

Hepcidin-regulating iron metabolism genes and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: a pathway analysis of genome-wide association studies.

Am J Clin Nutr 2021 10;114(4):1408-1417

Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD, USA.

Background: Epidemiological studies have suggested positive associations for iron and red meat intake with risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Inherited pathogenic variants in genes involved in the hepcidin-regulating iron metabolism pathway are known to cause iron overload and hemochromatosis.

Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine whether common genetic variation in the hepcidin-regulating iron metabolism pathway is associated with PDAC.

Methods: We conducted a pathway analysis of the hepcidin-regulating genes using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) summary statistics generated from 4 genome-wide association studies in 2 large consortium studies using the summary data-based adaptive rank truncated product method. Our population consisted of 9253 PDAC cases and 12,525 controls of European descent. Our analysis included 11 hepcidin-regulating genes [bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6), ferritin heavy chain 1 (FTH1), ferritin light chain (FTL), hepcidin (HAMP), homeostatic iron regulator (HFE), hemojuvelin (HJV), nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), ferroportin 1 (SLC40A1), transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1), and transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2)] and their surrounding genomic regions (±20 kb) for a total of 412 SNPs.

Results: The hepcidin-regulating gene pathway was significantly associated with PDAC (P = 0.002), with the HJV, TFR2, TFR1, BMP6, and HAMP genes contributing the most to the association.

Conclusions: Our results support that genetic susceptibility related to the hepcidin-regulating gene pathway is associated with PDAC risk and suggest a potential role of iron metabolism in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Further studies are needed to evaluate effect modification by intake of iron-rich foods on this association.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqab217DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8488877PMC
October 2021

Multi-ethnic genome-wide association analyses of white blood cell and platelet traits in the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study.

BMC Genomics 2021 Jun 9;22(1):432. Epub 2021 Jun 9.

Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Background: Circulating white blood cell and platelet traits are clinically linked to various disease outcomes and differ across individuals and ancestry groups. Genetic factors play an important role in determining these traits and many loci have been identified. However, most of these findings were identified in populations of European ancestry (EA), with African Americans (AA), Hispanics/Latinos (HL), and other races/ethnicities being severely underrepresented.

Results: We performed ancestry-combined and ancestry-specific genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for white blood cell and platelet traits in the ancestrally diverse Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) Study, including 16,201 AA, 21,347 HL, and 27,236 EA participants. We identified six novel findings at suggestive significance (P < 5E-8), which need confirmation, and independent signals at six previously established regions at genome-wide significance (P < 2E-9). We confirmed multiple previously reported genome-wide significant variants in the single variant association analysis and multiple genes using PrediXcan. Evaluation of loci reported from a Euro-centric GWAS indicated attenuation of effect estimates in AA and HL compared to EA populations.

Conclusions: Our results highlighted the potential to identify ancestry-specific and ancestry-agnostic variants in participants with diverse backgrounds and advocate for continued efforts in improving inclusion of racially/ethnically diverse populations in genetic association studies for complex traits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12864-021-07745-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8191001PMC
June 2021

Nongenetic Determinants of Risk for Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer.

JNCI Cancer Spectr 2021 Jun 20;5(3):pkab029. Epub 2021 May 20.

Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.

Background: Incidence of early-onset (younger than 50 years of age) colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing in many countries. Thus, elucidating the role of traditional CRC risk factors in early-onset CRC is a high priority. We sought to determine whether risk factors associated with late-onset CRC were also linked to early-onset CRC and whether association patterns differed by anatomic subsite.

Methods: Using data pooled from 13 population-based studies, we studied 3767 CRC cases and 4049 controls aged younger than 50 years and 23 437 CRC cases and 35 311 controls aged 50 years and older. Using multivariable and multinomial logistic regression, we estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the association between risk factors and early-onset CRC and by anatomic subsite.

Results: Early-onset CRC was associated with not regularly using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.21 to 1.68), greater red meat intake (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.16), lower educational attainment (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.16), alcohol abstinence (OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.08 to 1.39), and heavier alcohol use (OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.50). No factors exhibited a greater excess in early-onset compared with late-onset CRC. Evaluating risks by anatomic subsite, we found that lower total fiber intake was linked more strongly to rectal (OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.14 to 1.48) than colon cancer (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.27;  = .04).

Conclusion: In this large study, we identified several nongenetic risk factors associated with early-onset CRC, providing a basis for targeted identification of those most at risk, which is imperative in mitigating the rising burden of this disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jncics/pkab029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8134523PMC
June 2021

Genetically Predicted Circulating C-Reactive Protein Concentration and Colorectal Cancer Survival: A Mendelian Randomization Consortium Study.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2021 Jul 10;30(7):1349-1358. Epub 2021 May 10.

Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.

Background: A positive association between circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) and colorectal cancer survival was reported in observational studies, which are susceptible to unmeasured confounding and reverse causality. We used a Mendelian randomization approach to evaluate the association between genetically predicted CRP concentrations and colorectal cancer-specific survival.

Methods: We used individual-level data for 16,918 eligible colorectal cancer cases of European ancestry from 15 studies within the International Survival Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Consortium. We calculated a genetic-risk score based on 52 CRP-associated genetic variants identified from genome-wide association studies. Because of the non-collapsibility of hazard ratios from Cox proportional hazards models, we used the additive hazards model to calculate hazard differences (HD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between genetically predicted CRP concentrations and colorectal cancer-specific survival, overall and by stage at diagnosis and tumor location. Analyses were adjusted for age at diagnosis, sex, body mass index, genotyping platform, study, and principal components.

Results: Of the 5,395 (32%) deaths accrued over up to 10 years of follow-up, 3,808 (23%) were due to colorectal cancer. Genetically predicted CRP concentration was not associated with colorectal cancer-specific survival (HD, -1.15; 95% CI, -2.76 to 0.47 per 100,000 person-years; = 0.16). Similarly, no associations were observed in subgroup analyses by stage at diagnosis or tumor location.

Conclusions: Despite adequate power to detect moderate associations, our results did not support a causal effect of circulating CRP concentrations on colorectal cancer-specific survival.

Impact: Future research evaluating genetically determined levels of other circulating inflammatory biomarkers (i.e., IL6) with colorectal cancer survival outcomes is needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-20-1848DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8254760PMC
July 2021

Assessment of a Polygenic Risk Score for Colorectal Cancer to Predict Risk of Lynch Syndrome Colorectal Cancer.

JNCI Cancer Spectr 2021 Apr 8;5(2):pkab022. Epub 2021 Mar 8.

Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

It was not known whether the polygenic risk scores (PRSs) that predict colorectal cancer could predict colorectal cancer for people with inherited pathogenic variants in DNA mismatch repair genes-people with Lynch syndrome. We tested a PRS comprising 107 established single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with colorectal cancer in European populations for 826 European-descent carriers of pathogenic variants in DNA mismatch repair genes (293 , 314 , 126 , 71 , and 22 ) from the Colon Cancer Family Registry, of whom 504 had colorectal cancer. There was no evidence of an association between the PRS and colorectal cancer risk, irrespective of which DNA mismatch repair gene was mutated, or sex (all 2-sided >.05). The hazard ratio per standard deviation of the PRS for colorectal cancer was 0.97 (95% confidence interval = 0.88 to 1.06; 2-sided =.51). Whereas PRSs are predictive of colorectal cancer in the general population, they do not predict Lynch syndrome colorectal cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jncics/pkab022DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8062848PMC
April 2021

Circulating Levels of Testosterone, Sex Hormone Binding Globulin and Colorectal Cancer Risk: Observational and Mendelian Randomization Analyses.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2021 Jul 20;30(7):1336-1348. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.

Background: Epidemiologic studies evaluating associations between sex steroid hormones and colorectal cancer risk have yielded inconsistent results. To elucidate the role of circulating levels of testosterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in colorectal cancer risk, we conducted observational and Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses.

Methods: The observational analyses included 333,530 participants enrolled in the UK Biobank with testosterone and SHBG measured. HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. For MR analyses, genetic variants robustly associated with hormone levels were identified and their association with colorectal cancer (42,866 cases/42,752 controls) was examined using two-sample MR.

Results: In the observational analysis, there was little evidence that circulating levels of total testosterone were associated with colorectal cancer risk; the MR analyses showed a greater risk for women (OR per 1-SD = 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01-1.17), although pleiotropy may have biased this result. Higher SHBG concentrations were associated with greater colorectal cancer risk for women (HR per 1-SD = 1.16; 95% CI, 1.05-1.29), but was unsupported by the MR analysis. There was little evidence of associations between free testosterone and colorectal cancer in observational and MR analyses.

Conclusions: Circulating concentrations of sex hormones are unlikely to be causally associated with colorectal cancer. Additional experimental studies are required to better understand the possible role of androgens in colorectal cancer development.

Impact: Our results from large-scale analyses provide little evidence for sex hormone pathways playing a causal role in colorectal cancer development..
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-20-1690DOI Listing
July 2021

Genetically predicted circulating concentrations of micronutrients and risk of colorectal cancer among individuals of European descent: a Mendelian randomization study.

Am J Clin Nutr 2021 06;113(6):1490-1502

Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: The literature on associations of circulating concentrations of minerals and vitamins with risk of colorectal cancer is limited and inconsistent. Evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to support the efficacy of dietary modification or nutrient supplementation for colorectal cancer prevention is also limited.

Objectives: To complement observational and RCT findings, we investigated associations of genetically predicted concentrations of 11 micronutrients (β-carotene, calcium, copper, folate, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, selenium, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, and zinc) with colorectal cancer risk using Mendelian randomization (MR).

Methods: Two-sample MR was conducted using 58,221 individuals with colorectal cancer and 67,694 controls from the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium, Colorectal Cancer Transdisciplinary Study, and Colon Cancer Family Registry. Inverse variance-weighted MR analyses were performed with sensitivity analyses to assess the impact of potential violations of MR assumptions.

Results: Nominally significant associations were noted for genetically predicted iron concentration and higher risk of colon cancer [ORs per SD (ORSD): 1.08; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.17; P value = 0.05] and similarly for proximal colon cancer, and for vitamin B-12 concentration and higher risk of colorectal cancer (ORSD: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.21; P value = 0.01) and similarly for colon cancer. A nominally significant association was also noted for genetically predicted selenium concentration and lower risk of colon cancer (ORSD: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.96, 1.00; P value = 0.05) and similarly for distal colon cancer. These associations were robust to sensitivity analyses. Nominally significant inverse associations were observed for zinc and risk of colorectal and distal colon cancers, but sensitivity analyses could not be performed. None of these findings survived correction for multiple testing. Genetically predicted concentrations of β-carotene, calcium, copper, folate, magnesium, phosphorus, and vitamin B-6 were not associated with disease risk.

Conclusions: These results suggest possible causal associations of circulating iron and vitamin B-12 (positively) and selenium (inversely) with risk of colon cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqab003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8168352PMC
June 2021

Clinical significance of ragA, ragB, and PG0982 genes in Porphyromonas gingivalis isolates from periodontitis patients.

Eur J Oral Sci 2021 06 5;129(3):e12776. Epub 2021 Mar 5.

Department of Periodontics, Preventive and Restorative Dentistry, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Consistent detection of ragA, ragB, and PG0982 in the genome of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) isolates from periodontitis patients suggests that genotypes containing these genes may influence virulence and P. gingivalis-associated periodontitis progression. This study evaluated the prevalence of these genes in P. gingivalis isolates from periodontitis patients (n = 28) and in isolates from periodontally healthy P. gingivalis carriers (n = 34). The association of these genes with progression of periodontitis, in vitro cell invasiveness, and bacterial survival following periodontal therapy was also assessed. Periodontal charting and microbiological sampling were done at baseline, and at 6, 12, and 24 months following subgingival debridement of the periodontitis patients. Healthy controls were assessed at baseline for comparison. P. gingivalis isolates were analysed by ragA, ragB, and PG0982 specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Sanger sequencing. Primary human gingival fibroblasts were used for invasion experiments. Results showed that 25% of the tested isolates from the periodontitis group had ragB detected, whereas this gene was undetected in isolates from healthy participants. However, none of the selected genes was associated with an increased cell invasiveness in vitro, with bacterial survival, or with significant clinical periodontal parameter changes. Identification of genes that influence P.gingivalis virulence and therapeutic outcome may have a diagnostic or prognostic value.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/eos.12776DOI Listing
June 2021

Association of with Specific T-cell Subsets in the Colorectal Carcinoma Microenvironment.

Clin Cancer Res 2021 May 25;27(10):2816-2826. Epub 2021 Feb 25.

Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Purpose: While evidence indicates that () may promote colorectal carcinogenesis through its suppressive effect on T-cell-mediated antitumor immunity, the specific T-cell subsets involved remain uncertain.

Experimental Design: We measured DNA within tumor tissue by quantitative PCR on 933 cases (including 128 -positive cases) among 4,465 incident colorectal carcinoma cases in two prospective cohorts. Multiplex immunofluorescence combined with digital image analysis and machine learning algorithms for CD3, CD4, CD8, CD45RO (PTPRC isoform), and FOXP3 measured various T-cell subsets. We leveraged data on , microsatellite instability (MSI), tumor whole-exome sequencing, and M1/M2-type tumor-associated macrophages [TAM; by CD68, CD86, IRF5, MAF, and MRC1 (CD206) multimarker assay]. Using the 4,465 cancer cases and inverse probability weighting method to control for selection bias due to tissue availability, multivariable-adjusted logistic regression analysis assessed the association between and T-cell subsets.

Results: The amount of was inversely associated with tumor stromal CD3 lymphocytes [multivariable OR, 0.47; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.28-0.79, for -high vs. -negative category; = 0.0004] and specifically stromal CD3CD4CD45RO cells (corresponding multivariable OR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.32-0.85; = 0.003). These relationships did not substantially differ by MSI status, neoantigen load, or exome-wide tumor mutational burden. was not significantly associated with tumor intraepithelial T cells or with M1 or M2 TAMs.

Conclusions: The amount of tissue is associated with lower density of stromal memory helper T cells. Our findings provide evidence for the interactive pathogenic roles of microbiota and specific immune cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-20-4009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8127352PMC
May 2021

Genetic architectures of proximal and distal colorectal cancer are partly distinct.

Gut 2021 Jul 25;70(7):1325-1334. Epub 2021 Feb 25.

Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology - IDIBELL, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.

Objective: An understanding of the etiologic heterogeneity of colorectal cancer (CRC) is critical for improving precision prevention, including individualized screening recommendations and the discovery of novel drug targets and repurposable drug candidates for chemoprevention. Known differences in molecular characteristics and environmental risk factors among tumors arising in different locations of the colorectum suggest partly distinct mechanisms of carcinogenesis. The extent to which the contribution of inherited genetic risk factors for CRC differs by anatomical subsite of the primary tumor has not been examined.

Design: To identify new anatomical subsite-specific risk loci, we performed genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analyses including data of 48 214 CRC cases and 64 159 controls of European ancestry. We characterised effect heterogeneity at CRC risk loci using multinomial modelling.

Results: We identified 13 loci that reached genome-wide significance (p<5×10) and that were not reported by previous GWASs for overall CRC risk. Multiple lines of evidence support candidate genes at several of these loci. We detected substantial heterogeneity between anatomical subsites. Just over half (61) of 109 known and new risk variants showed no evidence for heterogeneity. In contrast, 22 variants showed association with distal CRC (including rectal cancer), but no evidence for association or an attenuated association with proximal CRC. For two loci, there was strong evidence for effects confined to proximal colon cancer.

Conclusion: Genetic architectures of proximal and distal CRC are partly distinct. Studies of risk factors and mechanisms of carcinogenesis, and precision prevention strategies should take into consideration the anatomical subsite of the tumour.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gutjnl-2020-321534DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8223655PMC
July 2021

Genetic Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in Colon Epithelium Provide Functional Insights for Genetic Risk Loci.

Cell Mol Gastroenterol Hepatol 2021 16;12(1):181-197. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Oncology Data Analytics Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain; Colorectal Cancer Group, Molecular Mechanisms and Experimental Therapy in Oncology (ONCOBELL) Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, Spain; Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain; Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address:

Background & Aims: The association of genetic variation with tissue-specific gene expression and alternative splicing guides functional characterization of complex trait-associated loci and may suggest novel genes implicated in disease. Here, our aims were as follows: (1) to generate reference profiles of colon mucosa gene expression and alternative splicing and compare them across colon subsites (ascending, transverse, and descending), (2) to identify expression and splicing quantitative trait loci (QTLs), (3) to find traits for which identified QTLs contribute to single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based heritability, (4) to propose candidate effector genes, and (5) to provide a web-based visualization resource.

Methods: We collected colonic mucosal biopsy specimens from 485 healthy adults and performed bulk RNA sequencing. We performed genome-wide SNP genotyping from blood leukocytes. Statistical approaches and bioinformatics software were used for QTL identification and downstream analyses.

Results: We provided a complete quantification of gene expression and alternative splicing across colon subsites and described their differences. We identified thousands of expression and splicing QTLs and defined their enrichment at genome-wide regulatory regions. We found that part of the SNP-based heritability of diseases affecting colon tissue, such as colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease, but also of diseases affecting other tissues, such as psychiatric conditions, can be explained by the identified QTLs. We provided candidate effector genes for multiple phenotypes. Finally, we provided the Colon Transcriptome Explorer web application.

Conclusions: We provide a large characterization of gene expression and splicing across colon subsites. Our findings provide greater etiologic insight into complex traits and diseases influenced by transcriptomic changes in colon tissue.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcmgh.2021.02.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8102177PMC
February 2021

Smoking Modifies Pancreatic Cancer Risk Loci on 2q21.3.

Cancer Res 2021 06 11;81(11):3134-3143. Epub 2021 Feb 11.

Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Germline variation and smoking are independently associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We conducted genome-wide smoking interaction analysis of PDAC using genotype data from four previous genome-wide association studies in individuals of European ancestry (7,937 cases and 11,774 controls). Examination of expression quantitative trait loci data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression Project followed by colocalization analysis was conducted to determine whether there was support for common SNP(s) underlying the observed associations. Statistical tests were two sided and < 5 × 10 was considered statistically significant. Genome-wide significant evidence of qualitative interaction was identified on chr2q21.3 in intron 5 of the transmembrane protein 163 (TMEM163) and upstream of the cyclin T2 (CCNT2). The most significant SNP using the Empirical Bayes method, in this region that included 45 significantly associated SNPs, was rs1818613 [per allele OR in never smokers 0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.82-0.93; former smokers 1.00, 95% CI, 0.91-1.07; current smokers 1.25, 95% CI 1.12-1.40, = 3.08 × 10). Examination of the Genotype-Tissue Expression Project data demonstrated an expression quantitative trait locus in this region for TMEM163 and CCNT2 in several tissue types. Colocalization analysis supported a shared SNP, rs842357, in high linkage disequilibrium with rs1818613 ( = 0. 94) driving both the observed interaction and the expression quantitative trait loci signals. Future studies are needed to confirm and understand the differential biologic mechanisms by smoking status that contribute to our PDAC findings. SIGNIFICANCE: This large genome-wide interaction study identifies a susceptibility locus on 2q21.3 that significantly modified PDAC risk by smoking status, providing insight into smoking-associated PDAC, with implications for prevention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-20-3267DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8178175PMC
June 2021

Marginal Adaptation and Microbial Leakage at Conometric Prosthetic Connections for Implant-Supported Single Crowns: An In Vitro Investigation.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Jan 17;22(2). Epub 2021 Jan 17.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20251 Hamburg, Germany.

Encouraging clinical results were reported on a novel cone-in-cone coupling for the fixation of dental implant-supported crowns (Acuris, Dentsply Sirona Implants, Mölndal, Sweden). However, the presence or absence of a microgap and a potential bacterial leakage at the conometric joint has not yet been investigated. A misfit and a resulting gap between the conometric components could potentially serve as a bacterial reservoir that promotes plaque formation, which in turn may lead to inflammation of the peri-implant tissues. Thus, a two-fold study set-up was designed in order to evaluate the bidirectional translocation of bacteria along conometrically seated single crowns. On conometric abutments filled with a culture suspension of anaerobic bacteria, the corresponding titanium nitride-coated (TiN) caps were fixed by friction. Each system was sterilized and immersed in culture medium to provide an optimal environment for microbial growth. Positive and negative controls were prepared. Specimens were stored in an anaerobic workstation, and total and viable bacterial counts were determined. Every 48 h, samples were taken from the reaction tubes to inoculate blood agar plates and to isolate bacterial DNA for quantification using qrt-PCR. In addition, one Acuris test system was subjected to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to evaluate the precision of fit of the conometric coupling and marginal crown opening. Throughout the observational period of one week, blood agar plates of the specimens showed no viable bacterial growth. qrt-PCR, likewise, yielded a result approaching zero with an amount of about 0.53 × 10 µg/mL DNA. While the luting gap/marginal opening between the TiN-cap and the ceramic crown was within the clinically acceptable range, the SEM analysis failed to identify a measurable microgap at the cone-in-cone junction. Within the limits of the in-vitro study it can be concluded that the Acuris conometric interface does not allow for bacterial translocation under non-dynamic loading conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22020881DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7830972PMC
January 2021

Ethanol exposure drives colon location specific cell composition changes in a normal colon crypt 3D organoid model.

Sci Rep 2021 01 11;11(1):432. Epub 2021 Jan 11.

Department of Public Health Sciences, Center for Public Health Genomics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.

Alcohol is a consistently identified risk factor for colon cancer. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its effect on normal colon crypt cells remains poorly understood. We employed RNA-sequencing to asses transcriptomic response to ethanol exposure (0.2% vol:vol) in 3D organoid lines derived from healthy colon (n = 34). Paired regression analysis identified 2,162 differentially expressed genes in response to ethanol. When stratified by colon location, a far greater number of differentially expressed genes were identified in organoids derived from the left versus right colon, many of which corresponded to cell-type specific markers. To test the hypothesis that the effects of ethanol treatment on colon organoid populations were in part due to differential cell composition, we incorporated external single cell RNA-sequencing data from normal colon biopsies to estimate cellular proportions following single cell deconvolution. We inferred cell-type-specific changes, and observed an increase in transit amplifying cells following ethanol exposure that was greater in organoids from the left than right colon, with a concomitant decrease in more differentiated cells. If this occurs in the colon following alcohol consumption, this would lead to an increased zone of cells in the lower crypt where conditions are optimal for cell division and the potential to develop mutations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-80240-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7801615PMC
January 2021

Predictive lifestyle markers for efficacy of cancer immune checkpoint inhibitors: a commentary.

Future Oncol 2021 Feb 5;17(4):363-369. Epub 2021 Jan 5.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington School of Public Health, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.

Lifestyle factors could plausibly modulate the host immune system, the tumor microenvironment and, hence, immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) response. As such, these factors should be considered in ICI studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fon-2020-0730DOI Listing
February 2021

Adiposity, metabolites, and colorectal cancer risk: Mendelian randomization study.

BMC Med 2020 12 17;18(1):396. Epub 2020 Dec 17.

Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: Higher adiposity increases the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but whether this relationship varies by anatomical sub-site or by sex is unclear. Further, the metabolic alterations mediating the effects of adiposity on CRC are not fully understood.

Methods: We examined sex- and site-specific associations of adiposity with CRC risk and whether adiposity-associated metabolites explain the associations of adiposity with CRC. Genetic variants from genome-wide association studies of body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, unadjusted for BMI; N = 806,810), and 123 metabolites from targeted nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics (N = 24,925), were used as instruments. Sex-combined and sex-specific Mendelian randomization (MR) was conducted for BMI and WHR with CRC risk (58,221 cases and 67,694 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium, Colorectal Cancer Transdisciplinary Study, and Colon Cancer Family Registry). Sex-combined MR was conducted for BMI and WHR with metabolites, for metabolites with CRC, and for BMI and WHR with CRC adjusted for metabolite classes in multivariable models.

Results: In sex-specific MR analyses, higher BMI (per 4.2 kg/m) was associated with 1.23 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.08, 1.38) times higher CRC odds among men (inverse-variance-weighted (IVW) model); among women, higher BMI (per 5.2 kg/m) was associated with 1.09 (95% CI = 0.97, 1.22) times higher CRC odds. WHR (per 0.07 higher) was more strongly associated with CRC risk among women (IVW OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.08, 1.43) than men (IVW OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.81, 1.36). BMI or WHR was associated with 104/123 metabolites at false discovery rate-corrected P ≤ 0.05; several metabolites were associated with CRC, but not in directions that were consistent with the mediation of positive adiposity-CRC relations. In multivariable MR analyses, associations of BMI and WHR with CRC were not attenuated following adjustment for representative metabolite classes, e.g., the univariable IVW OR for BMI with CRC was 1.12 (95% CI = 1.00, 1.26), and this became 1.11 (95% CI = 0.99, 1.26) when adjusting for cholesterol in low-density lipoprotein particles.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that higher BMI more greatly raises CRC risk among men, whereas higher WHR more greatly raises CRC risk among women. Adiposity was associated with numerous metabolic alterations, but none of these explained associations between adiposity and CRC. More detailed metabolomic measures are likely needed to clarify the mechanistic pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-020-01855-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7745469PMC
December 2020

A Combined Proteomics and Mendelian Randomization Approach to Investigate the Effects of Aspirin-Targeted Proteins on Colorectal Cancer.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2021 03 14;30(3):564-575. Epub 2020 Dec 14.

Nutrition and Metabolism Section, International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon, France.

Background: Evidence for aspirin's chemopreventative properties on colorectal cancer (CRC) is substantial, but its mechanism of action is not well-understood. We combined a proteomic approach with Mendelian randomization (MR) to identify possible new aspirin targets that decrease CRC risk.

Methods: Human colorectal adenoma cells (RG/C2) were treated with aspirin (24 hours) and a stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) based proteomics approach identified altered protein expression. Protein quantitative trait loci (pQTLs) from INTERVAL ( = 3,301) and expression QTLs (eQTLs) from the eQTLGen Consortium ( = 31,684) were used as genetic proxies for protein and mRNA expression levels. Two-sample MR of mRNA/protein expression on CRC risk was performed using eQTL/pQTL data combined with CRC genetic summary data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR), Colorectal Transdisciplinary (CORECT), Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer (GECCO) consortia and UK Biobank (55,168 cases and 65,160 controls).

Results: Altered expression was detected for 125/5886 proteins. Of these, aspirin decreased MCM6, RRM2, and ARFIP2 expression, and MR analysis showed that a standard deviation increase in mRNA/protein expression was associated with increased CRC risk (OR: 1.08, 95% CI, 1.03-1.13; OR: 3.33, 95% CI, 2.46-4.50; and OR: 1.15, 95% CI, 1.02-1.29, respectively).

Conclusions: MCM6 and RRM2 are involved in DNA repair whereby reduced expression may lead to increased DNA aberrations and ultimately cancer cell death, whereas ARFIP2 is involved in actin cytoskeletal regulation, indicating a possible role in aspirin's reduction of metastasis.

Impact: Our approach has shown how laboratory experiments and population-based approaches can combine to identify aspirin-targeted proteins possibly affecting CRC risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-20-1176DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8086774PMC
March 2021

Genetic Predictors of Severe Skin Toxicity in Patients with Stage III Colon Cancer Treated with Cetuximab: NCCTG N0147 (Alliance).

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2021 02 17;30(2):404-411. Epub 2020 Nov 17.

Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.

Background: Cetuximab, an EGFR inhibitor used to treat multiple cancer types, including colon cancer, causes severe skin toxicity in 5%-20% of patients, leading to decreased quality of life and treatment delays. Our understanding of which patients have an increased risk of severe toxicities is limited. We conducted a genome-wide association study to identify germline variants predictive of cetuximab-induced severe skin toxicity.

Methods: Our study included 1,209 patients with stage III colon cancer randomized to receive cetuximab plus 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin as part of the NCCTG N0147 (Alliance) clinical trial. Skin toxicity outcomes were collected using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. We performed genotyping, evaluating approximately 10 million genetic variants. We used logistic regression to evaluate the association of each genetic variant and severe (grade ≥ 3) skin toxicity, adjusting for age, sex, and genetic ancestry. Genome-wide significance was defined as < 5 × 10.

Results: Participants were predominantly middle-aged white men; 20% ( = 243) experienced severe skin toxicity. Two genetic variants in the retinoic acid receptor alpha () gene were significantly associated with severe skin toxicity [OR, 3.93; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.47-6.25; < 7.8 × 10]. Functional annotations indicate these variants are in the promoter. Additional significantly associated variants were identified in chromosome 2 intergenic regions.

Conclusions: Identified variants could represent a potential target for risk stratification of patients with colon cancer receiving cetuximab.

Impact: Retinoids have shown promise in the treatment of cetuximab-induced skin toxicity, so follow-up work could evaluate whether individuals with the variant would benefit from retinoid therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-20-1274DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7909617PMC
February 2021

Identifying Novel Susceptibility Genes for Colorectal Cancer Risk From a Transcriptome-Wide Association Study of 125,478 Subjects.

Gastroenterology 2021 03 12;160(4):1164-1178.e6. Epub 2020 Oct 12.

Department of Cancer Biology and Genetics and the Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

Background And Aims: Susceptibility genes and the underlying mechanisms for the majority of risk loci identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for colorectal cancer (CRC) risk remain largely unknown. We conducted a transcriptome-wide association study (TWAS) to identify putative susceptibility genes.

Methods: Gene-expression prediction models were built using transcriptome and genetic data from the 284 normal transverse colon tissues of European descendants from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx), and model performance was evaluated using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (n = 355). We applied the gene-expression prediction models and GWAS data to evaluate associations of genetically predicted gene-expression with CRC risk in 58,131 CRC cases and 67,347 controls of European ancestry. Dual-luciferase reporter assays and knockdown experiments in CRC cells and tumor xenografts were conducted.

Results: We identified 25 genes associated with CRC risk at a Bonferroni-corrected threshold of P < 9.1 × 10, including genes in 4 novel loci, PYGL (14q22.1), RPL28 (19q13.42), CAPN12 (19q13.2), MYH7B (20q11.22), and MAP1L3CA (20q11.22). In 9 known GWAS-identified loci, we uncovered 9 genes that have not been reported previously, whereas 4 genes remained statistically significant after adjusting for the lead risk variant of the locus. Through colocalization analysis in GWAS loci, we additionally identified 12 putative susceptibility genes that were supported by TWAS analysis at P < .01. We showed that risk allele of the lead risk variant rs1741640 affected the promoter activity of CABLES2. Knockdown experiments confirmed that CABLES2 plays a vital role in colorectal carcinogenesis.

Conclusions: Our study reveals new putative susceptibility genes and provides new insight into the biological mechanisms underlying CRC development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2020.08.062DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7956223PMC
March 2021

Circulating adipokine concentrations and risk of five obesity-related cancers: A Mendelian randomization study.

Int J Cancer 2021 04 26;148(7):1625-1636. Epub 2020 Oct 26.

Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.

Obesity is considered a chronic inflammatory state characterized by continued secretion of adipokines and cytokines. Experimental and epidemiological evidence indicates that circulating adipokines may be associated with the development of obesity-related cancers, but it is unclear if these associations are causal or confounded. We examined potential causal associations of specific adipokines (adiponectin, leptin, soluble leptin receptor [sOB-R] and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 [PAI-1]) with five obesity-related cancers (colorectal, pancreatic, renal cell carcinoma [RCC], ovarian and endometrial) using Mendelian randomization (MR) methods. We used summary-level data from large genetic consortia for 114 530 cancer cases and 245 284 controls. We constructed genetic instruments using 18 genetic variants for adiponectin, 2 for leptin and 4 for both sOB-R and PAI-1 (P value for inclusion<5 × 10 ). Causal estimates were obtained using two-sample MR methods. In the inverse-variance weighted models, we found an inverse association between adiponectin and risk of colorectal cancer (odds ratio per 1 μg/mL increment in adiponectin concentration: 0.90 [95% confidence interval = 0.84-0.97]; P = .01); but, evidence of horizontal pleiotropy was detected and the association was not present when this was taken into consideration. No association was found for adiponectin and risks of pancreatic cancer, RCC, ovarian cancer and endometrial cancer. Leptin, sOB-R and PAI-1 were also similarly unrelated to risk of obesity-related cancers. Despite the large sample size, our MR analyses do not support causal effects of circulating adiponectin, leptin, sOB-R and PAI-1 concentrations on the development of five obesity-related cancers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.33338DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7894468PMC
April 2021
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