Publications by authors named "Ulrike Fasching"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effects of Corroded and Non-Corroded Biodegradable Mg and Mg Alloys on Viability, Morphology and Differentiation of MC3T3-E1 Cells Elicited by Direct Cell/Material Interaction.

PLoS One 2016 26;11(7):e0159879. Epub 2016 Jul 26.

Research Unit Experimental Neurotraumatology, Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria.

This study investigated the effect of biodegradable Mg and Mg alloys on selected properties of MC3T3-E1 cells elicited by direct cell/material interaction. The chemical composition and morphology of the surface of Mg and Mg based alloys (Mg2Ag and Mg10Gd) were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDX, following corrosion in cell culture medium for 1, 2, 3 and 8 days. The most pronounced difference in surface morphology, namely crystal formation, was observed when Pure Mg and Mg2Ag were immersed in cell medium for 8 days, and was associated with an increase in atomic % of oxygen and a decrease of surface calcium and phosphorous. Crystal formation on the surface of Mg10Gd was, in contrast, negligible at all time points. Time-dependent changes in oxygen, calcium and phosphorous surface content were furthermore not observed for Mg10Gd. MC3T3-E1 cell viability was reduced by culture on the surfaces of corroded Mg, Mg2Ag and Mg10Gd in a corrosion time-independent manner. Cells did not survive when cultured on 3 day pre-corroded Pure Mg and Mg2Ag, indicating crystal formation to be particular detrimental in this regard. Cell viability was not affected when cells were cultured on non-corroded Mg and Mg alloys for up to 12 days. These results suggest that corrosion associated changes in surface morphology and chemical composition significantly hamper cell viability and, thus, that non-corroded surfaces are more conducive to cell survival. An analysis of the differentiation potential of MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on non-corroded samples based on measurement of Collagen I and Runx2 expression, revealed a down-regulation of these markers within the first 6 days following cell seeding on all samples, despite persistent survival and proliferation. Cells cultured on Mg10Gd, however, exhibited a pronounced upregulation of collagen I and Runx2 between days 8 and 12, indicating an enhancement of osteointegration by this alloy that could be valuable for in vivo orthopedic applications.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0159879PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4961286PMC
July 2017

Repetitive long-term hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) administered after experimental traumatic brain injury in rats induces significant remyelination and a recovery of sensorimotor function.

PLoS One 2014 21;9(5):e97750. Epub 2014 May 21.

Research Unit for Experimental Neurotraumatology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.

Cells in the central nervous system rely almost exclusively on aerobic metabolism. Oxygen deprivation, such as injury-associated ischemia, results in detrimental apoptotic and necrotic cell loss. There is evidence that repetitive hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) improves outcomes in traumatic brain-injured patients. However, there are no experimental studies investigating the mechanism of repetitive long-term HBOT treatment-associated protective effects. We have therefore analysed the effect of long-term repetitive HBOT treatment on brain trauma-associated cerebral modulations using the lateral fluid percussion model for rats. Trauma-associated neurological impairment regressed significantly in the group of HBO-treated animals within three weeks post trauma. Evaluation of somatosensory-evoked potentials indicated a possible remyelination of neurons in the injured hemisphere following HBOT. This presumption was confirmed by a pronounced increase in myelin basic protein isoforms, PLP expression as well as an increase in myelin following three weeks of repetitive HBO treatment. Our results indicate that protective long-term HBOT effects following brain injury is mediated by a pronounced remyelination in the ipsilateral injured cortex as substantiated by the associated recovery of sensorimotor function.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0097750PLOS
January 2015

Effects of the polymeric niche on neural stem cell characteristics during primary culturing.

J Mater Sci Mater Med 2014 May 28;25(5):1339-55. Epub 2014 Feb 28.

Research Unit for Experimental Neurotraumatology, Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 2/2, 8036, Graz, Austria.

The polymeric niche encountered by cells during primary culturing can affect cell fate. However, most cell types are primarily propagated on polystyrene (PS). A cell type specific screening for optimal primary culture polymers particularly for regenerative approaches seems inevitable. The effect of physical and chemical properties of treated (corona, oxygen/nitrogen plasma) and untreated cyclic olefin polymer (COP), polymethymethacrylate (PMMA), PP, PLA, PS, PC on neuronal stem cell characteristics was analyzed. Our comprehensive approach revealed plasma treated COP and PMMA as optimal polymers for primary neuronal stem cell culturing and propagation. An increase in the number of NT2/D1 cells with pronounced adhesion, metabolic activities and augmented expression of neural precursor markers was associated to the plasma treatment of surfaces of COP and PMMA with nitrogen or oxygen, respectively. A shift towards large cell sizes at stable surface area/volume ratios that might promote the observed increase in metabolic activities and distinct modulations in F-actin arrangements seem to be primarily mediated by the plasma treatment of surfaces. These results indicate that the polymeric niche has a distinct impact on various cell characteristics. The selection of distinct polymers and the controlled design of an optimized polymer microenvironment might thereby be an effective tool to promote essential cell characteristics for subsequent approaches.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10856-014-5155-yDOI Listing
May 2014

More than cell dust: microparticles isolated from cerebrospinal fluid of brain injured patients are messengers carrying mRNAs, miRNAs, and proteins.

J Neurotrauma 2013 Jul;30(14):1232-42

Research Unit for Experimental Neurotraumatology, Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.

Microparticles are cell-derived, membrane-sheathed structures that are believed to shuttle proteins, mRNA, and miRNA to specific local or remote target cells. To date best described in blood, we now show that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains similar structures that can deliver RNAs and proteins to target cells. These are, in particular, molecules associated with neuronal RNA granules and miRNAs known to regulate neuronal processes. Small RNA molecules constituted 50% of the shuttled ribonucleic acid. Using microarray analysis, we identified 81 mature miRNA molecules in CSF microparticles. Microparticles from brain injured patients were more abundant than in non-injured subjects and contained distinct genetic information suggesting that they play a role in the adaptive response to injury. Notably, miR-9 and miR-451 were differentially packed into CSF microparticles derived from patients versus non-injured subjects. We confirmed the transfer of genetic material from CSF microparticles to adult neuronal stem cells in vitro and a subsequent microRNA-specific repression of distinct genes. This first indication of a regulated transport of functional genetic material in human CSF may facilitate the diagnosis and analysis of cerebral modulation in an otherwise inaccessible organ.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/neu.2012.2596DOI Listing
July 2013
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