Publications by authors named "Ulrich Wehr"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The predictive power of the elimination of dioxin-like pollutants from pigs: an in vivo study.

Environ Int 2012 Jan 22;38(1):73-8. Epub 2011 Sep 22.

Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen, PR China.

Pigs accidentally given feed contaminated by dioxin-like pollutants are a serious public health issue. We have examined whether pigs with limited exposure during early periods of fattening would be categorized as non-compliant with the EU limit at slaughtering when growth-dilution, excretion and metabolism effects are considered. Sixteen female and sixteen castrated male weaned pigs were divided into four groups (e.g. DG0, DG1, DG2 and DG3) in week 2 after birth. From weeks 3 to 13, groups DG1, DG2, and DG3 pigs were fed with a polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin/dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture at dosages of 1, 10 and 100ng-toxic equivalent (TEQ) per kg dry mass feed in capsules, respectively. From weeks 13 to 23, the animals were nourished with clear feed. Control group DG0 was always fed with clear feed. Subcutaneous fat samples were collected at weeks 13, 18 and 23 by biopsies. The pollutant residues were analyzed by high resolution gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry and quantified by a (13)C-isotope dilution method. The results showed the following: (1) when slaughtered at week 23, the TEQ for DG1 pigs (0.66±0.21pg/g fat) was under the EU limit of 1pg PCDD/F-TEQ/g fat; (2) PCDD/F congener-specific first-order elimination rates were linearly correlated with their toxicity equivalency factors (TEFs), and the rates were significantly dose-dependent for the more toxic congeners (TEF≥0.1). Therefore, the pigs' exposure above the EU limit during the early fattening stage did not necessarily lead to their categorization as non-compliant pork; and the residual TEQ for pork can be predicted from early exposure concentrations based on the models established here.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2011.08.009DOI Listing
January 2012

Longitudinal in vivo effects of growth hormone overexpression on bone in transgenic mice.

J Bone Miner Res 2004 May 15;19(5):802-10. Epub 2004 Mar 15.

Musculoskeletal Research Group, Institute of Anatomy, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München, Germany.

Unlabelled: In this study we examined the effect of systemic overexpression of GH on bone in transgenic mice longitudinally in vivo over a period of 9 months. We observed substantially increased BMC in GH transgenic mice and a significant reduction in serum osteocalcin. GH effects on bone were strongly dependent on gender and developmental stage.

Introduction: State-of-the-art bone marker and microimaging technology was applied in this longitudinal study to examine bone metabolism, BMC, bone density, and cortical bone structure over the life span of growth hormone (GH) transgenic (tg) mice.

Materials And Methods: Thirty-eight mice from four genetic groups (male, female, tg, and controls) were examined with DXA, and their femur and tibia were examined with peripheral QCT (pQCT). Osteocalcin (formation) and collagen cross-links (resorption) from serum and urine were also measured at postnatal weeks 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, 26, and 38.

Results: GH tg mice displayed a significant increase in body weight (up to 50%) and BMC (up to 90%), but serum osteocalcin was significantly reduced compared with controls. GH tg females (but not males) displayed increased trabecular density over controls up to week 12. In contrast, male (but not female) GH tg mice displayed a higher cortical cross-sectional area than controls. Cortical density was significantly lower in both male and female GH tg mice compared with control mice.

Conclusions: The increase in BMC in GH tg mice is associated with reduced serum osteocalcin levels, indicating that bone turnover may be lower than in the control mice. On a structural level, bone responds to GH excess in a gender-specific manner, with alterations varying substantially between different developmental stages.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1359/JBMR.040308DOI Listing
May 2004

Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) overexpression negatively regulates bone size and mass, but not density, in the absence and presence of growth hormone/IGF-I excess in transgenic mice.

Anat Embryol (Berl) 2002 Dec 20;206(1-2):139-48. Epub 2002 Nov 20.

Forschungsgruppe Muskuloskelettales System, Anatomische Anstalt, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Pettenkoferstrasse 11, 80336 München, Germany.

Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) has been suggested to be a negative regulator of bone growth and maintenance. The objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated IGFBP-2 on the skeletal phenotype of adult transgenic mice, in the absence and presence of growth hormone (GH) excess. 43 male mice were examined at an age of 4 months (7 IGFBP-2 transgenic mice, 12 GH transgenic mice, 10 mice carrying both transgenes, and 14 controls). The bone mineral content of the total skeleton and of isolated bones was quantified by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), after validation versus ash analysis. Cortical and trabecular bone was quantified by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), after validation versus microCT. A strong linear relationship was found between DXA and ash weight, and between pQCT and micro CT ( r>0.95). Bone size and bone mineral content were significantly reduced in IGFBP-2 transgenic mice, the magnitude of the effect varying between skeletal sites and between bone compartments. Elevated IGFBP-2 negatively modulated the GH-stimulated increase in bone size and mineral content, and completely blocked GH-effects at cortical sites. Notably, bone density was not decreased in IGFBP-2 transgenic animals compared with controls. In conclusion, IGFBP-2 is identified as a potent negative regulator of normal and GH-stimulated bone growth in vivo. Interestingly, elevated IGFBP-2 levels did not lead to a decrease in bone density, suggesting that IGFBP-2 negatively affects bone size and mineral content, but not bone maintenance in adult mice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00429-002-0282-5DOI Listing
December 2002

Iodine balance in relation to iodine intake in ponies.

J Nutr 2002 06;132(6 Suppl 2):1767S-8S

Institute for Animal Physiology, Physiological Chemistry and Animal Nutrition, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jn/132.6.1767SDOI Listing
June 2002