Publications by authors named "Ulrich Gauger"

20 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Duration of deafness impacts auditory performance after cochlear implantation: A meta-analysis.

Laryngoscope Investig Otolaryngol 2021 Apr 4;6(2):291-301. Epub 2021 Feb 4.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health Berlin Germany.

Objective: Hearing loss is a highly disabling condition. Cochlear implantation is an established remedy if conventional hearing aids have failed to alleviate the level of disability. Unfortunately, cochlear implant (CI) performance varies dramatically. This study aims to examine the effects of duration of deafness (DoD) prior to cochlear implantation and the postoperative duration of implant experience with resulting hearing performance in postlingually deaf patients.

Methods: A systematic literature review and two meta-analyses were conducted using the search terms AND . Included studies evaluate the correlation between the DoD and auditory performance after cochlear implantation using monosyllabic and sentence tests. Correlation coefficients were determined using Pearson's correlation and Spearman rho.

Results: A total of 36 studies were identified and included data on cochlear implantations following postlingual deafness and postoperative speech testing of hearing outcomes for 1802 patients. The mean age ranged from 44 to 68 years with a DoD of 0.1 to 77 years. Cochlear implant use varied from 3 months to 14 years of age. Speech perception, which was assessed by sentence and monosyllabic word perception, was negatively correlated with DoD. Subgroup analyses revealed worse outcomes for longer DoD and shorter postoperative follow-up.

Conclusion: DoD is one of the most important factors to predict speech perception after cochlear implantation in postlingually deaf patients. The meta-analyses revealed a negative correlation between length of auditory deprivation and postoperative sentence and monosyllabic speech perception. Longer DoD seems to lead to worse CI performance, whereas more experience with CI mitigates the effect.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lio2.528DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8035957PMC
April 2021

A systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical and functional outcomes of artificial urinary sphincter implantation in women with stress urinary incontinence.

Arab J Urol 2020 Feb 4;18(2):78-87. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

Department of Urology and Pediatric Urology, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Aachen, Germany.

Objective: To evaluate the complications and results of artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) implantation in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI).

Methods: A selective database search using keywords (1990-2019) was conducted to validate the effectiveness of the AUS in women. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were utilised. The meta-analysis included 964 women (15 studies) with persistent SUI. The Newcastle-Ottawa score was used to determine the quality of the evidence in each study. The success rate and complications associated with the AUS were analysed.

Results: Meta-analysis of the published studies showed that complete continence was achieved at a mean rate of 79.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 72.2-86.6%) and a significant improvement was achieved in 15% (95% CI 10-25%). The mean (range) follow-up was 22 (6-204) months. The mean number of patients per study was 68. The mean (range) explantation rate was 13 (0-44)%. Vaginal erosion occurred in a mean (range) of 9 (0-27)% and mechanical complications in 13 (0-47)%. Infections accounted for 7% of the complications. The total mean (range) revision rate of the implanted AUS was 15.42 (0-44)%. The mean (range) size of the cuff used was 6.7 (5-10) cm.

Conclusion: Our present analysis showed that implantation of an AUS in women with severe UI is an effective treatment option after failure of first-line therapy. However, the currently available study population is too small to draw firm conclusions.

Abbreviations: AMS: American Medical Systems; AUS: artificial urinary sphincter; EAU: European Association of Urology; LE: Level of Evidence; PRISMA: Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses; QoL: quality of life; SHELTER: Services and Health for Elderly in Long TERm care (study); SUI: (stress) urinary incontinence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/2090598X.2020.1716293DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7473178PMC
February 2020

Psychosis in German prisoners: Comparison of the clinical appearance of psychotic disorder of an imprisoned population with a not detained community group.

Behav Sci Law 2020 Sep 24;38(5):482-492. Epub 2020 Aug 24.

Institute of Forensic Psychiatry, Charité University Hospital Berlin, Germany.

Surveys confirm risk factors for the incarceration of patients with psychosis including homelessness and comorbidity. There is also agreement that severe psychosis can lead to violence. Data describing prisoners with psychosis in Germany are scarce. We aimed to compare patients with psychosis in a prison hospital and patients with psychosis in a community hospital. Demographic data were collected, as well as comorbidity in the form of substance dependence and a psychiatric assessment using the German version of the 18-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). In the prison hospital group more patients were homeless (17 versus 2%) and non-German (36 versus 4%). There were also more patients with substance dependence or abuse in the prison hospital group. The total scores of BPRS and PANSS were lower in the prison hospital group (BPRS, 43.8 versus 51.2; PANSS, 71.5 versus 83.7). We assume that social disintegration for mentally disturbed offenders prior to incarceration hindered effective treatment. To avoid further social disintegration and possible further deterioration of mental health status of released offenders, which may lead to reoffending after imprisonment, discharge management after release from prison should be improved.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bsl.2480DOI Listing
September 2020

Milan criteria in the MELD era-is it justifiable to extend the limits for orthotopic liver transplantation?

World J Surg Oncol 2020 Jul 7;18(1):158. Epub 2020 Jul 7.

Department of Visceral, Transplant, Thoracic, and Vascular Surgery, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

Background: The Milan criteria (MC) are widely used for the indication of liver transplantation (LTx) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Good long-term results have also been reported following LTx for patients exceeding the MC. In this article, we compare the overall and recurrence-free survival of our patients fulfilling and exceeding the MC according to the post-transplant histopathological results.

Patients And Methods: Data from 120 patients with HCC (22 females and 98 males) were analyzed. The median patient age was 61 years (Q1, Q3 54.7, 65.4), and the median MELD score was 11 (Q1, Q3 8, 15). The median follow-up period was 53 months (Q1, Q3 16.6, 78). Patients were categorized into established criteria (MC, up-to-seven (UTS), Asan criteria, AFP score), and the outcome of the individual groups was compared.

Results: Seventy-four of 120 patients fulfilled the MC, 86 patients met the UTS criteria, 85 patients fulfilled the Asan criteria, and 79 patients had an AFP score less than or equal to 2. The 1- and 5-year survival rates of all patients were 76.7% and 55.6%, respectively. In total, 14.2% of all patients (5.4% of patients who met the MC, 7% of patients who met the UTS criteria, 5.9% of patients who met the Asan criteria, and 6.3% of patients who had an AFP score less than 2) experienced recurrence.

Conclusions: The outcomes of the patients were comparable to those reported in the current literature. In our population, similar recurrence and survival rates of the patients were noted for patients fulfilling the UTS criteria irrespective of fulfilling or exceeding the MC. Consequently, we consider using UTS criteria as the extended criterion for LTx indication.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12957-020-01932-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7339581PMC
July 2020

The transversus abdominis plane block may reduce chronic postoperative pain one year after TAPP ingunial hernia repair.

Ann Med Surg (Lond) 2020 Jul 23;55:190-194. Epub 2020 May 23.

Department of General, Visceral and Cancer Surgery, Helios Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Schwanebecker Chaussee 50, 13125, Berlin, Germany.

Introduction: Chronic postoperative inguinal pain (CPIP) is defined as pain impacting daily activities lasting at least 3 months. With an incidence of 0.5-6.0%, chronic pain affects many patients who underwent inguinal hernia repair (IHR). Early severe postoperative pain has been described as a risk factor for CPIP. Thus, we aim to investigate the impact of the transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block on CPIP.

Methods: From 2013 to 2019 we collected data from individuals who were operated on electively in TAPP technique and who received a preoperative TAP block.

Results: Data from 289 patients were selected. 259 patients were male. The mean age was 59.93 years and the mean BMI was 25.72 kg/m2. 252 patients suffered from a primary inguinal hernia. No mesh fixation was conducted. 21 patients reported pain at rest, 26 pain under physical exertion and 13 patients required treatment of their pain. In 6.25% of cases patients reported CPIP. We compared our findings with data from the German Herniamed Registry (unilateral, primary IH, men, no mesh fixation; n = 8.799), because we assume that the majority of these patients did not receive a TAP block. The rate of pain under physical exertion (9.2% vs. 10.05%) and pain requiring treatment (2.45% vs. 2.95%) one year after surgery slightly differs without a statistical significance.

Conclusions: We assume that the TAP block may reduce CPIP, postoperative pain during physical exertion and pain requiring treatment following IHR in TAPP technique. Additional randomized clinical trials are mandatory to evaluate the hypothesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amsu.2020.04.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7270497PMC
July 2020

Patient reported outcome following incisional hernia repair: A survey on 163 patients at two maximum care hospitals.

Ann Med Surg (Lond) 2019 Aug 15;44:5-12. Epub 2019 Jun 15.

Department of General, Visceral and Cancer Surgery, Helios Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Berlin, Schwanebecker Chaussee 50, 13125, Berlin, Germany.

Introduction: Incisional hernias of the abdominal wall are frequent complications after laparotomy (9-20%) and often need incisional hernia repair (IHR). In order to ensure wound healing and to therefore prevent postoperative short and long term morbidity carrying an abdominal binder (AB) and physical rest is frequently advised. However, there is a lack of evidence concerning clinical effects regarding these recommendations. Hence, we conducted a survey to analyze the patient reported outcome following IHR.

Methods: From December 2017 to May 2018, we conducted a survey among 270 patients who underwent open and laparoscopic IHR at two maximum care hospitals. They were interviewed about their type of operation, postoperative treatment, recommendations, and outcome.

Results: 163 patients replied to the questionnaire. The average age was 63.2 ± 12 years. 74 patients were female and 89 were male. 32.6% of the patients reported an AB-induced immobility and 71.2% reported that the AB reduced pain after IHR. A prolonged period of physical rest and the use of an AB had no statistical significance on postoperative morbidity.

Conclusions: Due to our findings we assume that the AB may induce immobility and reduce postoperative pain. A prolonged period of physical rest and wearing an AB does not seem to have an impact on the postoperative outcome following IHR. Therefore, a shortened duration of physical rest and wearing an AB following IHR should be taken under consideration. To reveal more evidence on this topic further clinical trials are essential.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amsu.2019.06.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6586918PMC
August 2019

Patient reported outcome following incisional hernia repair: A survey on 163 patients at two maximum care hospitals.

Ann Med Surg (Lond) 2019 Aug 15;44:5-12. Epub 2019 Jun 15.

Department of General, Visceral and Cancer Surgery, Helios Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Berlin, Schwanebecker Chaussee 50, 13125, Berlin, Germany.

Introduction: Incisional hernias of the abdominal wall are frequent complications after laparotomy (9-20%) and often need incisional hernia repair (IHR). In order to ensure wound healing and to therefore prevent postoperative short and long term morbidity carrying an abdominal binder (AB) and physical rest is frequently advised. However, there is a lack of evidence concerning clinical effects regarding these recommendations. Hence, we conducted a survey to analyze the patient reported outcome following IHR.

Methods: From December 2017 to May 2018, we conducted a survey among 270 patients who underwent open and laparoscopic IHR at two maximum care hospitals. They were interviewed about their type of operation, postoperative treatment, recommendations, and outcome.

Results: 163 patients replied to the questionnaire. The average age was 63.2 ± 12 years. 74 patients were female and 89 were male. 32.6% of the patients reported an AB-induced immobility and 71.2% reported that the AB reduced pain after IHR. A prolonged period of physical rest and the use of an AB had no statistical significance on postoperative morbidity.

Conclusions: Due to our findings we assume that the AB may induce immobility and reduce postoperative pain. A prolonged period of physical rest and wearing an AB does not seem to have an impact on the postoperative outcome following IHR. Therefore, a shortened duration of physical rest and wearing an AB following IHR should be taken under consideration. To reveal more evidence on this topic further clinical trials are essential.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amsu.2019.06.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6586918PMC
August 2019

Bilirubin, urobilinogen, pancreas elastase and bile acid in drain fluid. The GBUP-study: Analysis of biomarkers for a colorectal anastomotic leakage.

Ann Med Surg (Lond) 2018 Nov 21;35:44-50. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Department of General, Visceral and Cancer Surgery, HELIOS Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Berlin, Germany.

Purpose: A colorectal anastomotic leakage (CAL) is a major complication after colorectal surgery and leads to high rates of morbidity and prolonged hospital stay. The study aims to evaluate the benefit of using bilirubin, urobilinogen, pancreas elastase and bile acid in the drain fluid (DF) as a predictive marker for the CAL.

Methods: From June 2015 to October 2017 100 patients, who underwent left hemicolectomy (LH), sigma resection (SR), high anterior resection (HAR), low anterior resection (LAR) or reversal of Hartmann's Procedure (ROHP) were included in this monocentric non-randomized prospective clinical trial. During the first four postoperative days (POD) the concentration of bilirubin, urobilinogen, pancreas elastase and bile acid in the DF was measured.

Results: In total 100 patients were recruited. 17 were excluded due to intraoperative decisions to conduct a protective stoma. 6 patients had a CAL. The patients of the control group (n = 77) and the patients who suffered from a CAL (n = 6) had no increased concentration of urobilinogen and pancreas elastase in the DF. The concentration of bile acid in the DF of the patients who suffered from a CAL differed from those of the control group on the 4th POD (p = 0.055).The concentration of bilirubin in the DF of the patients who suffered from a CAL significantly differed from those of the control group on the 1st POD (p = 0.031) and on the 3rd POD (p = 0.041).

Conclusion: Bilirubin and bile acid in the DF may function as a predictive marker for a CAL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amsu.2018.09.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6170325PMC
November 2018

Meta-analysis of subjective complaints of vertigo and vestibular tests after cochlear implantation.

Laryngoscope 2018 09 4;128(9):2110-2123. Epub 2018 Jan 4.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Charité-University Hospital, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany.

Objective: Postoperative vertigo is a common complaint after cochlear implantation, but published incidence rates differ vastly. The aim of the present study was to investigate both subjective complaints of vertigo before and after cochlear implantation and related vestibular diagnostic tests on cochlear implant candidates.

Data Sources: We performed a systematic literature search according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement in PubMed, Cochrane Register, and EMBASE.

Review Methods: We presented 116 eligible studies investigating subjective complaints of vertigo after cochlear implantation and/or related vestibular diagnostic tests. We conducted three meta-analyses of 46 eligible studies with matched pre- and postoperative data to calculate the odds ratio of new vertigo onset, as well as the impairment of vestibular receptors measured by nystagmography and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP). Postoperative vertigo was calculated from 95 studies and further subdivided by mean age with pooled data.

Results: We observed a significant increase in postoperative vertigo and significant impairment of nystagmography and cVEMP detection. Vertigo after cochlear implantation was reported in 9.3% of the patients with a continuous increase in patient age at surgery. In a subgroup of studies, new onset of vertigo was found in 17.4% of the patients. In addition, 7.2% of the patients had persisting vertigo complaints, whereas 11.6% described an altered vertigo quality and 7.7% had their preoperative complaints resolved. A comparison of round window approach and cochleostomy revealed significantly increased vertigo after cochleostomy. Both insertion methods showed similar effects in nystagmography and cVEMP testing.

Conclusion: Cochlear implantation has a significant impact on subjective vertigo and vestibular receptor function. This is affected by the patient's age at the time of surgery. The surgical technique (round window or cochleostomy) may influence the outcome, but this requires further investigation. Younger patients may compensate better following vestibular dysfunction. Perioperative testing is required to correlate vestibular impairment and subjective complaints. Laryngoscope, 2018 Laryngoscope, 128:2110-2123, 2018.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lary.27071DOI Listing
September 2018

Induction of labor in patients with an unfavorable cervix after a cesarean using an osmotic dilator versus vaginal prostaglandin.

J Perinat Med 2018 Apr;46(3):299-307

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vivantes Klinikum im Friedrichshain, Affiliate of Charité University, Berlin, Germany.

Background: Trial of labor after cesarean (TOLAC) is a viable option for safe delivery. In some cases cervical ripening and subsequent labor induction is necessary. However, the commonly used prostaglandins are not licensed in this subgroup of patients and are associated with an increased risk of uterine rupture.

Methods: This cohort study compares maternal and neonatal outcomes of TOLAC in women (n=82) requiring cervical ripening agents (osmotic dilator vs. prostaglandins). The initial Bishop scores (BSs) were 2 (0-5) and 3 (0-5) (osmotic dilator and prostaglandin group, respectively). In this retrospective analysis, Fisher's exact test, the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test and Pearson's chi-squared test were utilized.

Results: Vaginal birth rate (including operative delivery) was 55% (18/33) in the osmotic dilator group vs. 51% (25/49) in the dinoprostone group (P 0.886). Between 97% and 92% (32/33 and 45/49) (100%, 100%) of neonates had an Apgar score of >8 after 1 min (5, 10 min, respectively). The time between administration of the agent and onset of labor was 36 and 17.1 h (mean, Dilapan-S® group, dinoprostone group, respectively). Time from onset of labor to delivery was similar in both groups with 4.4 and 4.9 h (mean, Dilapan-S® group, dinoprostone group, respectively). Patients receiving cervical ripening with Dilapan-S® required oxytocin in 97% (32/33) of cases. Some patients presented with spontaneous onset of labor, mostly in the dinoprostone group (24/49, 49%). Amniotomy was performed in 64% and 49% (21/33 and 24/49) of cases (Dilapan-S® group and dinoprostone group, respectively).

Conclusions: This pilot study examines the application of an osmotic dilator for cervical ripening to promote vaginal delivery in women who previously delivered via cesarean section. In our experience, the osmotic dilator gives obstetricians a chance to perform induction of labor in these women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/jpm-2017-0029DOI Listing
April 2018

Spatial distribution of allergenic pollen through a large metropolitan area.

Environ Monit Assess 2017 Apr 18;189(4):169. Epub 2017 Mar 18.

Foundation German Pollen Information Service, Charitéplatz 1, 10117, Berlin, Germany.

For nearly a decade, the majority of the world's population has been living in cities, including a considerable percentage of people suffering from pollen allergy. The increasing concentration of people in cities results in larger populations being exposed to allergenic pollen at the same time. There is almost no information about spatial distribution of pollen within cities as well as a lack of information about the possible impact to human health. To obtain this increasing need for pollen exposure studies on an intra-urban scale, a novelty screening network of 14 weekly changed pollen traps was established within a large metropolitan area-Berlin, Germany. Gravimetric pollen traps were placed at a uniform street-level height from March until October 2014. Three important allergenic pollen types for Central Europe-birch (Betula), grasses (Poaceae), and mugwort (Artemisia)-were monitored. Remarkable spatial and temporal variations of pollen sedimentation within the city and the influences by urban local sources are shown. The observed differences between the trap with the overall highest and the trap with the overall lowest amount of pollen sedimentation were in the case of birch pollen 245%, grass pollen 306%, and mugwort pollen 1962%. Differences of this magnitude can probably lead to different health impacts on allergy sufferers in one city. Therefore, pollen should be monitored preferably in two or more appropriate locations within large cities and as a part of natural air quality regulations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-017-5876-8DOI Listing
April 2017

Diagnosis of HCC for patients with cirrhosis using miRNA profiles of the tumor-surrounding tissue - A statistical model based on stepwise penalized logistic regression.

Exp Mol Pathol 2016 Oct 20;101(2):165-171. Epub 2016 Aug 20.

University of Leipzig, Visceral, Transplant, Thoracic, and Vascular Surgery, Germany; General and Visceral Surgery, Helios Park-Klinikum Leipzig, Germany.

The presence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a significant complication of cirrhosis because it changes the prognosis and the treatment of the patients. By now, contrast-enhanced CT and MR scans are the most reliable tools for the diagnosis of HCC; however, in some cases, a biopsy of the tumor is necessary for the final diagnosis. The aim of the study was to develop a diagnostic tool using the microRNA (miRNA) profiles of the tissue surrounding the HCC tumor combined with clinical parameters in statistical models. At a transplantation setting, 32 patients with HCC and cirrhosis (B) were compared to 22 patients suffering from cirrhosis only (A). The diagnosis and exclusion of HCC was confirmed following the histopathological examination of the explanted liver. The HCC patients were significantly older than the patients with cirrhosis only (B: 60.6 and A: 49.9, p<0.001) and showed higher levels of ALT (A: 0.76μkat/l, B: 1.02μkat/, p=0.006) and AFP (A: 5.8ng/ml, B: 70.3ng/ml, p<0.001), whereas the bilirubin levels were higher in the cirrhosis only group (p=0.002). Using age (cut-off 50.23years) and AFP (cut-off 4.2ng/ml) thresholds, the levels of expression of miR-1285-3p and miR-943 differentiated between the patients with HCC and cirrhosis from those with cirrhosis only with an accuracy of 96.3%. This is the first report about the use of stepwise penalized logistic regression and decision tree analyses of miRNA expressions in the tumor-surrounding tissue combined with clinical parameters for the diagnosis of HCC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yexmp.2016.07.014DOI Listing
October 2016

Antenatal body mass index (BMI) and weight gain in pregnancy - its association with pregnancy and birthing complications.

J Perinat Med 2016 May;44(4):397-404

Background: Overweight and obesity is a serious health risk in both developed and developing nations. It is a common finding among women in their reproductive age. Half of patients entering their pregnancy in the US have a BMI >25.0 and therefore qualify as overweight or obese. Moreover, there is a tendency towards increased weight gain during pregnancy. Studies have shown that gestational overweight is associated with complications in pregnancy and birthing as well as short-term and long-term impacts on neonatal outcome in childhood and adulthood.

Methods: Five hundred and ninety-one women visiting our tertiary perinatal center in 2014 were analyzed for antenatal BMI, gestational weight gain, as well as pregnancy outcome and complication together with neonatal weight and outcome. Pregnancy weight gain was assessed based on the IOM guidelines (Institute of Medicine) issued in 2009.

Results: Twenty-nine percent of our population was overweight with a BMI of more than 25.0. The general weight gain was in every BMI group similar (median ranging from 12.0 to 14.0 kg). Approximately one third gained more than the appropriate amount (37%, P<0.001). Women with more gestational weight were at risk of labor induction (55.0% vs. 45.7% labor induction in total, P=0.007). Strikingly, those patients were found to have significantly higher rates of secondary cesarean section (22.4% vs. 15.4%) and decreased chances of spontaneous vaginal birth (57.5% vs. 61.4%) (P=0.008). Furthermore women with a pregnancy weight gain in excess of the guidelines gave birth to neonates with a higher birth weight (>75.centile, 28.3% vs. 21.3%, P<0.001).

Conclusions: Altogether, one third of the analyzed population is already overweight or obese when entering pregnancy. A higher gestational weight gain than the recommended amount was found in 37% of cases. We found an association with pregnancy and birthing complications as well as higher infant weight. This highlights the importance of preconceptive and prenatal advice, and if necessary, intervention on BMI and weight gain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/jpm-2015-0172DOI Listing
May 2016

CD44 and CXCL9 serum protein levels predict the risk of clinically significant allograft rejection after liver transplantation.

Liver Transpl 2015 Sep 21;21(9):1195-207. Epub 2015 Jul 21.

General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, Experimental Surgery and Regenerative Medicine, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

The diagnosis of acute cellular rejection (ACR) after liver transplantation is based on histological analysis of biopsies because noninvasive biomarkers for allograft rejection are not yet established for clinical routines. CD31, CD44, and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL) 9 have previously been described as biomarkers for cross-organ allograft rejection. Here, we assessed the predictive and diagnostic value of these proteins as serum biomarkers for clinically significant ACR in the first 6 months after liver transplantation in a prospective study. The protein levels were measured in 94 patients immediately before transplantation, at postoperative days (PODs) 1, 3, 7, and 14 and when biopsies were performed during episodes of biochemical graft dysfunction. The CD44 serum protein levels were significantly lower at POD 1 in patients who experienced histologically proven ACR in the follow-up compared with patients without ACR (P < 0.001). CXCL9 was significantly higher before transplantation (P = 0.049) and at POD 1 (P < 0.001) in these patients. Low CD44 values (cutoff, <200.5 ng/mL) or high CXCL9 values (cutoff, >2.7 ng/mL) at POD 1 differentiated between rejection and no rejection with a sensitivity of 88% or 60% and a specificity of 61% or 79%, respectively. The combination of both biomarker cutoffs at POD 1 had a positive predictive value of 91% and a negative predictive value of 67% for clinically significant ACR. Moreover, CD44 was significantly lower at the time of ACR (P < 0.001) and differentiated the rejection group from patients with graft dysfunction due to other reasons. Our results suggest that CD44 and CXCL9 may serve as predictive biomarkers to identify liver allograft recipients at risk for clinically significant ACR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lt.24164DOI Listing
September 2015

Data quality of the German screening colonoscopy registry.

Endoscopy 2013 Oct 9;45(10):813-8. Epub 2013 Sep 9.

Central Interdisciplinary Endoscopy Unit, Department of Gastroenterology, Charité University Medical Hospitals, Berlin, Germany.

Background And Study Aims: The German screening colonoscopy program is accompanied by a central registry that records the main outcome quality indicators, namely colonoscopy completion rate, adenoma detection rate (ADR), and complication rate. The aim of the present study was to assess the quality of these registry data by comparing them with data from a prospective quality assurance study based on a self-reporting audit and patient feedback of screening colonoscopy.

Patients And Methods: The completeness of registry information was analyzed by comparing it with prospective data gathered by audit and patient feedback in a previous quality assurance study (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00860665) between October 2006 and March 2008. The main outcome parameters were colonoscopy completion rate, ADR, and complication rate. Complications were recorded in three steps in the audit study using case report forms (immediate and subsequent documentation by physicians [CRF-1 and CRF-2], and patient follow-up [CRF-3]), but were documented in the registry without differentiation.

Results: A total of 12 134 individuals (mean age 64.5 years; 47 % men) who underwent screening colonoscopy at 19 private practices in Berlin over the 18-month period were included in the audit study. Patient feedback was obtained for 90.1 %. A total of 12 150 cases had been recorded in the registry by the same private practices during the same period. Colonoscopy completion rate and ADR data were comparable in the audit study and registry (completion rate 98.2 % vs. 97.7 %; ADR 21.0 % vs. 20.5 %). However, compared with the registry data, the complication rate was 3.1-fold higher in the audit (0.46 % vs. 0.15 %; P < 0.001), and double (0.33 % vs. 0.15 %; P < 0.05) when patient feedback was not included.

Conclusions: Of the screening colonoscopy quality parameters, colonoscopy completion rate and ADR, but not complication rates, were reliably documented in the German national screening colonoscopy registry. Data on complications need to be appropriately standardized and audited in order to be used for credentialing and benchmarking purposes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0033-1344583DOI Listing
October 2013

Subsquamous extension of intestinal metaplasia is detected in 98% of cases of neoplastic Barrett's esophagus.

Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2014 Mar 23;12(3):405-10. Epub 2013 Jul 23.

Departments of Interdisciplinary Endoscopy, Pathology, and General and Abdominal Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Background & Aims: Subsquamous intestinal metaplasia (SSIM) has been observed after endotherapy in patients with neoplastic Barrett's esophagus (BE). However, it is not clear whether SSIM occurs in untreated patients. Incompletely eradicated SSIM could provide a source of recurrent disease. We assessed its prevalence in a large cohort of patients who had not received endoscopic therapy.

Methods: Two experienced pathologists analyzed 138 samples of 506 resection specimens found to contain squamous epithelium from 110 patients with neoplastic BE treated by widespread endoscopic mucosal resection (92 men; mean age, 66 years). The maximum extent of SSIM was measured.

Results: Of the 138 samples analyzed, 124 (89.9%) were found to contain SSIM from 108 of the 110 patients (98.2%). The mean length of SSIM was 3.3 mm (range, 0.2-9.6 mm; 25% ≥ 5 mm); SSIM length correlated with BE length (P < .05). In 83 of 138 samples (60.1%), the SSIM consisted partially or entirely of neoplasias of different grades, with a mean subsquamous extension of 3.3 mm; the extension correlated with grade of neoplasia (P = .0001).

Conclusions: Most patients with BE with neoplasia (of all grades) have subsquamous extension of intestinal metaplasia, including subsquamous extension of lesions at the squamocolumnar junction. Therefore, biopsy and resection of neoplastic BE should extend at least 1 cm into the squamous epithelium.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cgh.2013.07.013DOI Listing
March 2014

Capsule colonoscopy increases uptake of colorectal cancer screening.

BMC Gastroenterol 2012 Jun 26;12:80. Epub 2012 Jun 26.

Department of Interdisciplinary Endoscopy, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Regional Hospital, Hamburg, Germany.

Background: Screening colonoscopy effectiveness is hampered by limited adherence by the general population. The present prospective study was performed to evaluate whether adding capsule colonoscopy to the endoscopic screening options increases uptake.

Methods: Invitation letters were sent to 2150 persons above the age of 55 insured with a German medical insurance company in the area of Rinteln, Lower Saxony with a baseline spontaneous annual screening colonoscopy uptake of 1 %. Both capsule or conventional colonoscopy were offered. Interested persons were given information about the two screening options by four local gastroenterologists and examinations were then performed according to screenees' final choice.

Results: 154 persons sought further information, and 34 and 90 underwent conventional and capsule colonoscopy, respectively. Colonoscopy uptake was thus increased by the invitation process by 60 % (1.6 % vs. 1 %; p = 0.075), while the option of capsule endoscopy led to a fourfold increase of screening uptake (4.2 % vs. 1 %, p < 0.001). Despite similar age distribution in both sex groups, uptake in men was significantly higher (5.6 % vs. 2.8 %, p = 002). However, overall adenoma yield was not different in both groups.

Conclusions: The present study suggests that offering the option of capsule colonoscopy increases uptake of endoscopic colorectal cancer screening. However, capsule endoscopy sensitivity for adenoma detection needs to be improved.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-230X-12-80DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3407015PMC
June 2012

Factors determining the quality of screening colonoscopy: a prospective study on adenoma detection rates, from 12,134 examinations (Berlin colonoscopy project 3, BECOP-3).

Gut 2013 Feb 22;62(2):236-41. Epub 2012 Mar 22.

Central Interdisciplinary Endoscopy, Charité Medical University, Campus Virchow Hospital, Berlin, Germany.

Background: Screening colonoscopy (SC) outcome quality is best determined by the adenoma detection rate (ADR). The substantial variability in the ADRs between endoscopists may reflect different skills, experience and/or equipment.

Objective: To analyse the potential factors that may influence ADR variance, including case volume.

Design: 12,134 consecutive SCs (mean age 64.5 years, 47% men) from 21 Berlin private-practice colonoscopists were prospectively studied during 18 months. The data were analysed using a two-level mixed linear model to adequately address the characteristics of patients and colonoscopists. The ADR was regressed after considering the following factors: sex, age, bowel cleanliness, NSAID intake, annual SC case volume, lifetime experience, instrument withdrawal times, instrument generations used, and the number of annual continuing medical education (CME) meetings attended by the physician. The case volume was also retrospectively analysed from the 2007 national SC registry data (312,903 colonoscopies and 1004 colonoscopists).

Results: The patient factors that correlated with the ADR were sex, age (p<0.001) and low quality of bowel preparation (p=0.005). The factors that were related to the colonoscopists were the number of CME meetings attended (p=0.012) and instrument generation (p=0.001); these factors accounted for approximately 40% of the interphysician variability. Within a narrow range (6-11 min), the withdrawal time was not correlated with the ADR. Annual screening case volume did not correlate with the ADR, and this finding was confirmed by the German registry data.

Conclusions: The outcome quality of screening colonoscopies is mainly influenced by individual colonoscopist factors (ie, CME activities) and instrument quality.

Clinical Trial Registration Number: Clinical Trial Gov Registration number: NCT00860665.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gutjnl-2011-300167DOI Listing
February 2013

Latest generation, wide-angle, high-definition colonoscopes increase adenoma detection rate.

Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2012 Feb 2;10(2):155-9. Epub 2011 Nov 2.

Central Interdisciplinary Endoscopy Unit, Department of Gastroenterology, Charité University Medical Hospitals, Berlin, Germany.

Background & Aims: Improvements to endoscopy imaging technologies might improve detection rates of colorectal cancer and patient outcomes. We compared the accuracy of the latest generation of endoscopes with older generation models in detection of colorectal adenomas.

Methods: We compared data from 2 prospective screening colonoscopy studies (the Berlin Colonoscopy Project 6); each study lasted approximately 6 months and included the same 6 colonoscopists, who worked in private practice. Participants in group 1 (n = 1256) were all examined by using the latest generation of wide-angle, high-definition colonoscopes that were manufactured by the same company. Individuals in group 2 (n = 1400) were examined by endoscopists who used routine equipment (a mixture of endoscopes from different companies; none of those used to examine group 1). The adenoma detection rate was calculated on the basis of the number of all adenomas/number of all patients.

Results: There were no differences in patient parameters or withdrawal time between groups (8.0 vs 8.2 minutes). The adenoma detection rate was significantly higher in group 1 (0.33) than in group 2 (0.27; P = .01); a greater number of patients with least 1 adenoma were identified in group 1 (22.1%) than in group 2 (18.2%; P = .01). A higher percentage of high-grade dysplastic adenomas were detected in group 1 (1.19%) than in group 2 (0.57%), but this difference was not statistically significant (P = .06).

Conclusions: The latest generation of wide-angle, high-definition colonoscopes improves rates of adenoma detection by 22%, compared with mixed, older technology endoscopes used in routine private practice. These findings might affect definitions of quality control parameters for colonoscopy screening for colorectal cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cgh.2011.10.026DOI Listing
February 2012

Live image processing does not increase adenoma detection rate during colonoscopy: a randomized comparison between FICE and conventional imaging (Berlin Colonoscopy Project 5, BECOP-5).

Am J Gastroenterol 2010 Nov 13;105(11):2383-8. Epub 2010 Jul 13.

University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Objectives: Fujinon intelligent chromoendoscopy (FICE) is a post-processing imaging technique for increasing contrast of mucosa and mucosal lesions that might lead to improvement in colonic adenoma detection during colonoscopy. Previous studies on similar contrast-enhancing techniques as well as on dye staining have yielded variable and conflicting results. This large randomized trial was undertaken to determine whether FICE technology enhances adenoma detection rate (ADR).

Methods: In a prospective study performed in a multicenter private practice and hospital setting, involving 8 examiners with substantial lifetime experience (>10,000 colonoscopies each), 1,318 patients (men 46.7%, women 53.3%; mean age 59.05 years) were randomly assigned to colonoscopy with either FICE or white light imaging on instrument withdrawal. Of the colonoscopies, 68% were screening and 32% were diagnostic examinations. The primary outcome measure was the ADR (i.e., number of adenomas/total number of patients).

Results: There was no difference between the two groups in terms of general ADR (0.28 in both groups), the total number of adenomas (184 vs. 183), or detection of subgroups of adenomas. The rate of identification of hyperplastic polyps was also the same in both groups (127 vs. 121; P=0.67). The results were the same for both the screening and the diagnostic colonoscopy subgroups. Withdrawal time was the same in both groups (8.4 vs. 8.3 min, P=0.55).

Conclusions: This large randomized trial could not show any objective advantage of the FICE technique over conventional high-resolution endoscopy in terms of improved ADR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2010.273DOI Listing
November 2010
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