Publications by authors named "Ulf P Guenther"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Molecular genetics of pseudoxanthoma elasticum: type and frequency of mutations in ABCC6.

Hum Mutat 2005 Sep;26(3):235-48

Charité, Franz Volhard Clinic, HELIOS Klinikum, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.

Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a systemic heritable disorder that affects the elastic tissue in the skin, eye, and cardiovascular system. Mutations in the ABCC6 gene cause PXE. We performed a mutation screen in ABCC6 using haplotype analysis in conjunction with direct sequencing to achieve a mutation detection rate of 97%. This screen consisted of 170 PXE chromosomes in 81 families, and detected 59 distinct mutations (32 missense, eight nonsense, and six likely splice-site point mutations; one small insertion; and seven small and five large deletions). Forty-three of these mutations are novel variants, which increases the total number of PXE mutations to 121. While most mutations are rare, three nonsense mutations, a splice donor site mutation, and the large deletion comprising exons 23-29 (c.2996_4208del) were identified as relatively frequent PXE mutations at 26%, 5%, 3.5%, 3%, and 11%, respectively. Chromosomal haplotyping with two proximal and two distal polymorphic markers flanking ABCC6 demonstrated that most chromosomes that carry these relatively frequent PXE mutations have related haplotypes specific for these mutations, which suggests that these chromosomes originate from single founder mutations. The types of mutations found support loss-of-function as the molecular mechanism for the PXE phenotype. In 76 of the 81 families, the affected individuals were either homozygous for the same mutation or compound heterozygous for two mutations. In the remaining five families with one uncovered mutation, affected showed allelic compound heterozygosity for the cosegregating PXE haplotype. This demonstrates pseudo-dominance as the relevant inheritance mechanism, since disease transmission to the next generation always requires one mutant allelic variant from each parent. In contrast to other previous clinical and molecular claims, our results show evidence only for recessive PXE. This has profound consequences for the genetic counseling of families with PXE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.20206DOI Listing
September 2005

Single nucleotide polymorphism map of five long-QT genes.

J Mol Med (Berl) 2005 Feb 15;83(2):159-65. Epub 2004 Dec 15.

HELIOS Klinikum, Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Medical Faculty of the Charité, Berlin, Germany.

We screened a white population for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five long QT syndrome genes, namely, KCNQ1 (LQT1), HERG (LQT2), SCN5A (LQT3), KCNE1 (LQT5), and KCNE2 (LQT6). We found 35 SNPs, 10 of which have not been previously described. Ten SNPs were in KCNE1, six in HERG, eight in KCNQ1, four in KCNE2, and seven in SCN5A. Four SNPs were associated with QTc interval in our 141 subjects, one in KCNE1, one in KCNE2, and two in SCN5A. Two of these SNPs have not been described. We conclude that these five long QT syndrome genes contain common variants, some of which are associated with QTc interval in normal persons. We suggest that analysis of these SNPs in a much larger cohort would enable establishment of common haplotypes that are associated with QTc. These haplotypes could facilitate prediction of arrhythmia risk in the general population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00109-004-0595-3DOI Listing
February 2005

Genomic rearrangements at the IGHMBP2 gene locus in two patients with SMARD1.

Hum Genet 2004 Sep;115(4):319-26

Department of Neuropediatrics, Charité University Medical School of Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin, Germany.

Autosomal recessive spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1) is caused by mutations in the immunoglobulin mu-binding protein 2 (IGHMBP2) gene. Patients affected by the infantile form of SMARD1 present with early onset respiratory distress. So far, patients with neither juvenile onset nor with larger deletions/rearrangements in IGHMBP2 have been reported. In this study, we investigated one patient with infantile (4 months) and another with juvenile (4.3 years) onset of respiratory distress. Direct sequencing of all exons and flanking intron sequences in both patients revealed a mutation on only one allele. In both patients, we identified genomic rearrangements of the other allele of IGHMBP2 by means of Southern blotting. Putative breakpoints were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction on genomic and cDNA. The patient with juvenile onset had an Alu/Alu mediated rearrangement, which resulted in the loss of aproximately 18.5 kb genomic DNA. At the mRNA level, this caused an in-frame deletion of exons 3-7. The patient with infantile onset had a complex rearrangement with two deletions and an inversion between intron 10 and 14. This rearrangement led to a frameshift at the mRNA level. Our results show that SMARD1 can be caused by genomic rearrangements at the IGHMBP2 gene locus. This may be missed by mere sequence analysis. Additionally, we demonstrate that juvenile onset SMARD1 may also be caused by mutations of IGHMBP2. The complex nature of the genomic rearrangement in the patient with infantile SMARD1 is discussed and a deletion mechanism is proposed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00439-004-1156-0DOI Listing
September 2004

Infantile spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1).

Ann Neurol 2003 Dec;54(6):719-24

Department of Neuropediatrics, Charité, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt University, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin, Germany.

Autosomal recessive spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1) is the second anterior horn cell disease in infants in which the genetic defect has been defined. SMARD1 results from mutations in the gene encoding the immunoglobulin micro-binding protein 2 (IGHMBP2) on chromosome 11q13. Our aim was to review the clinical features of 29 infants affected with SMARD1 and report on 26 novel IGHMBP2 mutations. Intrauterine growth retardation, weak cry, and foot deformities were the earliest symptoms of SMARD1. Most patients presented at the age of 1 to 6 months with respiratory distress due to diaphragmatic paralysis and progressive muscle weakness with predominantly distal lower limb muscle involvement. Sensory and autonomic nerves are also affected. Because of the poor prognosis, there is a demand for prenatal diagnosis, and clear diagnostic criteria for infantile SMARD1 are needed. The diagnosis of SMARD1 should be considered in infants with non-5q spinal muscular atrophy, neuropathy, and muscle weakness and/or respiratory distress of unclear cause. Furthermore, consanguineous parents of a child with sudden infant death syndrome should be examined for IGHMBP2 mutations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.10755DOI Listing
December 2003