Publications by authors named "Ulaganathan Arisekar"

7 Publications

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Dietary intake of trace elements from commercially important fish and shellfish of Thoothukudi along the southeast coast of India and implications for human health risk assessment.

Mar Pollut Bull 2021 Oct 9;173(Pt A):113020. Epub 2021 Oct 9.

Department of Fish Quality Assurance and Management, Fisheries College and Research Institute, Thoothukudi, India.

The concentrations of eight trace elements (chromium, cobalt, copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and lead) in14 commercially important fish and shellfish collected from Thoothukudi along the southeast coast of India was investigated using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in order to assess the health risks associated with their consumption. The concentration of trace elements ranged from 0.001 to 39.5 μg/g. The estimated weekly intake of cadmium in seven fish and shellfish (0.0081-0.0996 mg/kg body weight) were above the provisional tolerable weekly intake set by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives. The risk assessment analysis indicated that there was non- carcinogenic risk upon lifetime consumption of rock crab, C. natator (TTHQ >1) and carcinogenic risks upon lifetime consumption of S. jello, P. semisulcatus, P. sanguinolentus C. natator, Uroteuthis duvaceli, Sepia pharaonis and Cistopus indicus due to cadmium exposure indicating a potential health risk to the exposed consumers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2021.113020DOI Listing
October 2021

Heavy metal concentrations in the macroalgae, seagrasses, mangroves, and crabs collected from the Tuticorin coast (Hare Island), Gulf of Mannar, South India.

Mar Pollut Bull 2021 Feb 24;163:111971. Epub 2021 Jan 24.

Department of Fish Quality Assurance and Management, Fisheries College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Fisheries University, Tuticorin 628 008, Tamil Nadu, India.

This study investigates the concentration of heavy metals in the macroalgae, seagrasses, mangroves, and crabs collected from Hare Island, Gulf of Mannar Marine Biosphere Reserve. The concentration of heavy metals ranged between 0.06 (Hg)-259 (Fe) μg/g in macroalgae, 0.09 (Pb)-377 (Fe) μg/g in seagrasses, 0.112 (Cd)-122 (Fe) μg/g in mangroves, and 0.11 (Cd) -240 (Fe) μg/g in crabs. The levels of heavy metals in the analyzed samples were found below the maximum residual limits (MRLs) prescribed by various National and International agencies. The result suggests that exposure to the analyzed metals through macroalgae consumption does not cause potential health risks to consumers (target hazard quotient (THQ), estimated exposure dose (EED), and hazard index (HI) <1). Hence, this study concludes that macroalgae that grow in the Gulf of Mannar regions are safe for human consumption and are suitable to prepare food supplements and bioceutical products.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2021.111971DOI Listing
February 2021

Pesticides contamination in the Thamirabarani, a perennial river in peninsular India: The first report on ecotoxicological and human health risk assessment.

Chemosphere 2021 Mar 13;267:129251. Epub 2020 Dec 13.

Tamil Nadu Fisheries University, Nagapattinam, 611002, Tamil Nadu, India.

This study evaluates the distribution of pesticides and assesses the ecological and human health risks associated with pesticide residues concentration in the Thamirabarani River, the only perennial river in Tamil Nadu, India. Observed a variation in the pesticide concentration in the water (not detected (ND)-31.69 μg/L), sediments (ND-14.77 μg/kg), and fish (0.02-26.05 μg/kg). Endosulfan, aldrin, and endrin were the predominant organochlorine pesticides present in water, sediments, and fish. The average concentration of pesticides (except endosulfan) in water and sediments was found to be below the acceptable threshold as per the water and sediment quality guidelines, posing no ecological hazard to aquatic organisms. The calculated risk quotient and toxic unit (0.1 > TU/RQ ≤ 1) represent low-to-medium acute and chronic toxicity to the aquatic organisms inhabiting the river basin. The average concentration of pesticides in fish (Labeorohita) was also below the maximum residual limits set by the Codex Alimentarius Commission (CAC). However, the calculated daily intakes of endosulfan, aldrin, and endrin were above the CAC-acceptable daily intake guidelines. The human health risk assessment showed that children and adults exposed to pesticides in water and sediments through ingestion and dermal contact could have higher cancer risks (CR > 10) than inhalation. This study recommends implementing effective and routine pollution management schemes to avoid pesticide threats to aquatic and human health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2020.129251DOI Listing
March 2021

Heavy metal concentration in reef-associated surface sediments, Hare Island, Gulf of Mannar Marine Biosphere Reserve (southeast coast of India): The first report on pollution load and biological hazard assessment using geochemical normalization factors and hazard indices.

Mar Pollut Bull 2021 Jan 19;162:111838. Epub 2020 Nov 19.

Department of Fish Quality Assurance and Management, Fisheries College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Fisheries University, Tuticorin 628 008, Tamil Nadu, India.

In this study, reef-associated surface sediment samples were collected from Hare Island in the Gulf of Mannar Marine Biosphere Reserve, Bay of Bengal and analyzed for heavy metal concentration. The sediment quality was evaluated based on the geochemical, biological, and ecological hazard indices. The mean concentration of heavy metals in the sediments ranged from 0.02 (Cd) to 26,262.87 mg/kg (Fe). Except for Cd and Hg, all other elements were found to be below the sediment quality guidelines and contamination level. The biological and ecological hazard (BEHI) revealed that most sediment samples (80%) fell under the low-risk category with 9% probability of toxicity to the marine flora and fauna. The overall contamination level of heavy metals in Hare Island suggested that the sediment could be grouped under low-risk category. Hence, this study recommends the need for a routine monitoring program in this region to maintain a clean and sustainable ecosystem in future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.111838DOI Listing
January 2021

Trace element concentrations in the organs of fish along the southeast coast of India.

Mar Pollut Bull 2021 Jan 9;162:111817. Epub 2020 Nov 9.

Department of Fish Quality Assurance and Management, Fisheries College and Research Institute, Thoothukudi, Tamil Nadu, India.

Trace element pollution in the marine system is a global concern as the exposure of marine organisms to this pollution results in bioaccumulation and further transfer of the trace elements to humans through food chain. In the present study, the distribution of trace elements, namely chromium, cobalt, nickel, iron, copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, mercury, and lead, in gills, bone, liver, and muscle of eight commercially important fish collected along the southeast coast of India was analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. The liver was the main organ of accumulation for copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, and mercury; bone for chromium, cobalt, and lead; gills for copper; and muscle for arsenic and mercury. The concentration of toxic trace elements such as arsenic, cadmium, mercury, and lead in the edible portion of fish was lower than the recommended International Legislation limits, indicating that the fish of this region are safe for consumption.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.111817DOI Listing
January 2021

Human health risk assessment of heavy metals in aquatic sediments and freshwater fish caught from Thamirabarani River, the Western Ghats of South Tamil Nadu.

Mar Pollut Bull 2020 Oct 29;159:111496. Epub 2020 Jul 29.

Tamil Nadu Fisheries University, Nagapattinam 611 002, Tamil Nadu, India.

Industrialization and advancements in agriculture are increasingly the cause of environmental concerns and need to be addressed. This study was carried out at four sampling sites, viz. Manimuthar (site 1), Tirunelveli (site 2), Srivaikuntam (site 3), and Authoor (site 4), along the Thamirabarani river. The heavy metal concentration in fish and sediments were ranged from 0.001 to 9.505 mg kg and 0.294 to 106.25 mg kg. The lifetime cancer risk (LCR) values for children and adults were found to be above the acceptable threshold value (ATV) and children were found to be more susceptible to health risks. For all sites except site 4, the LCR of toxic metals except Cd were within the ATV (10-10); the value of Cd was above the ATV, and poses a high cancer risk to the downstream inhabitants. This study advises routine heavy metal monitoring on aquatic organisms along these sites to implement regulatory standards.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.111496DOI Listing
October 2020

Concentrations of trace elements in the organs of commercially exploited crustaceans and cephalopods caught in the waters of Thoothukudi, South India.

Mar Pollut Bull 2020 May 11;154:111045. Epub 2020 Mar 11.

Department of Fish Quality Assurance and Management, Fisheries College and Research Institute, Thoothukudi, Tamil Nadu, India.

Concentrations of trace elements (arsenic, cadmium, mercury, and lead) in tissues (muscle, gills, and digestive gland) of three commercially exploited crustaceans (Portunus sanguinolentus, Charybdis natator, and Penaeus semisulcatus) and three cephalopods (Doryteuthis sibogae, Sepia pharaonis, and Cistopus indicus) were examined. The animals were captured in the waters of Thoothukudi, and the tissues of six individuals of each species were analyzed using ICP-MS. The highest concentrations of arsenic (16.5 μg/g) and mercury (0.052 μg/g) were recorded in the digestive gland of C. natator, and cadmium (69.9 μg/g) and lead (0.351 μg/g) in the digestive gland of S. pharaonis. The edible portion of the crustaceans and cephalopods contained lower concentrations of trace elements, and these were below allowable limits set by the European Union. The edible parts of the investigated samples are safe for human consumption, but accidental contamination of the edible tissues with material from the digestive glands could lead to concerns relating to metal toxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.111045DOI Listing
May 2020
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