Publications by authors named "Uday Sandhu"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Psychosocial symptoms of ventricular arrhythmias: Integrating patient-reported outcomes into clinical care.

Heart Rhythm O2 2021 Dec 17;2(6Part B):832-839. Epub 2021 Dec 17.

Knight Cardiovascular Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon.

Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are a valuable metric for assessing the quality of life and overall well-being in patients with ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) and/or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). The incorporation of PROMs into the workflow of a VA clinic not only allows for more patient-centered care but also may improve detection and treatment of clinically relevant anxiety or depression symptoms. Awareness of the factors known to correlate with adverse PROM scores may guide PROM administration and subsequent referral to mental health services. Further, change or stability in PROM scores can be used as a gauge to guide the effectiveness of cardiac and psychological treatment in certain populations that are the focus of this manuscript: patients with ICDs (with and without shocks), cardiac arrest survivors, and those with inherited arrhythmia syndromes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hroo.2021.09.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8710626PMC
December 2021

Figure-of-Eight Sutures in Fully Anticoagulated Patients After Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion May Obviate Need for Anticoagulation Reversal: Vascular Management After LAAO.

Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol 2021 10 27;14(10):e010268. Epub 2021 Sep 27.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Knight Cardiovascular Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland OR.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCEP.121.010268DOI Listing
October 2021

One-Year Mortality in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Stenotic Bicuspid versus Tricuspid Aortic Valves: A Meta-Analysis and Meta-Regression.

J Interv Cardiol 2019 2;2019:8947204. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine and Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA.

Objective: To assess 1-year mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with bicuspid aortic stenosis (AS).

Background: Clinical trials have proven the beneficial effect of TAVR on mortality in patients with tricuspid AS. Individuals with bicuspid AS were excluded from these trials.

Methods: A meta-analysis using literature search from the Cochrane, PubMed, ClinicalTrials, SCOPUS, and EMBASE databases was conducted to determine the effect of TAVR on 1-year mortality in patients with bicuspid AS. Short-term outcomes that could potentially impact one-year mortality were analyzed.

Results: After evaluating 380 potential articles, 5 observational studies were selected. A total of 3890 patients treated with TAVR were included: 721 had bicuspid and 3,169 had tricuspid AS. No statistically significant difference between the baseline characteristics of the two groups of patients was seen outside of mean aortic gradient. Our primary endpoint of one-year all-cause mortality revealed 85 deaths in 719 patients (11.82%) with bicuspid AS compared to 467 deaths in 3100 patients (15.06%) with tricuspid AS, with no difference between both groups [relative risk (RR) 1.03; 95% CI 0.70-1.51]. Patients with bicuspid AS were associated with a decrease in device success (RR 0.62; 95% CI 0.45-0.84) and an increase in moderate-to-severe prosthetic valve regurgitation (RR 1.55; 95% CI 1.07-2.22) after TAVR compared to patients with tricuspid AS. The effect of meta-regression coefficients on one-year all-cause mortality was not statistically significant for any patient baseline characteristics.

Conclusion: When comparing TAVR procedure in tricuspid AS versus bicuspid AS, there was no difference noted in one-year all-cause mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2019/8947204DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6739767PMC
February 2020

The wearable cardioverter-defibrillator vest: Indications and ongoing questions.

Prog Cardiovasc Dis 2019 May - Jun;62(3):256-264. Epub 2019 May 9.

Division of Cardiology, Electrophysiology and Arrhythmia Service, University of California, San Francisco. Electronic address:

Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) for the prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD) among specific high-risk populations. However, it remains unclear how to optimally treat those patients who are at elevated risk of cardiac arrest but are not among the presently identified groups proven to benefit from an ICD, are unable to tolerate surgical device implantation, or refuse invasive therapies. The wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) is an alternative antiarrhythmic device that provides continuous cardiac monitoring and defibrillation capabilities through a noninvasive, electrode-based system. The WCD has been shown to be highly effective at restoration of sinus rhythm in patients with a ventricular tachyarrhythmia, and one randomized trial using the WCD in patients with recent myocardial infarction at elevated risk for arrhythmic death reported a decrease in overall mortality despite no SCD mortality benefit. The current clinical indications for WCD use are varied and continue to evolve as experience with this technology increases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcad.2019.05.005DOI Listing
October 2019

Antimicrobial salvage therapy for native valve MRSA endocarditis.

J Antimicrob Chemother 2017 06;72(6):1841-1842

Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 6431 Fannin St., Houston, TX 77030, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkx041DOI Listing
June 2017

Coordination of Cellular Localization-Dependent Effects of Sumoylation in Regulating Cardiovascular and Neurological Diseases.

Adv Exp Med Biol 2017 ;963:337-358

Department of Cardiology - Research, Division of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 2121 W. Holcombe Blvd, Unit Number: 1101, Room Number: IBT8.803E, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.

Sumoylation, a reversible post-transcriptional modification process, of proteins are involved in cellular differentiation, growth, and even motility by regulating various protein functions. Sumoylation is not limited to cytosolic proteins as recent evidence shows that nuclear proteins, those associated with membranes, and mitochondrial proteins are also sumoylated. Moreover, it is now known that sumoylation plays an important role in the process of major human ailments such as malignant, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. In this chapter, we will highlight and discuss how the localization of SUMO protease and SUMO E3 ligase in different compartments within a cell regulates biological processes that depend on sumoylation. First, we will discuss the key role of sumoylation in the nucleus, which leads to the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis . We will then discuss how sumoylation of plasma membrane potassium channel proteins are involved in epilepsy and arrhythmia. Mitochondrial proteins are known to be also sumoylated, and the importance of dynamic-related protein 1 (DRP1) sumoylation on mitochondrial function will be discussed. As we will emphasize throughout this review, sumoylation plays crucial roles in different cellular compartments, which is coordinately regulated by the translocation of various SUMO proteases and SUMO E3 ligase. Comprehensive approach will be necessary to understand the molecular mechanism for efficiently moving around various enzymes that regulate sumoylation within cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-50044-7_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5716632PMC
September 2017

Flow signaling and atherosclerosis.

Cell Mol Life Sci 2017 05 30;74(10):1835-1858. Epub 2016 Dec 30.

Department of Cardiology, Division of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Unit 1101, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, Texas, 77030-4009, USA.

Atherosclerosis rarely develops in the region of arteries exposed to undisturbed flow (u-flow, unidirectional flow). Instead, atherogenesis occurs in the area exposed to disturbed flow (d-flow, multidirectional flow). Based on these general pathohistological observations, u-flow is considered to be athero-protective, while d-flow is atherogenic. The fact that u-flow and d-flow induce such clearly different biological responses in the wall of large arteries indicates that these two types of flow activate each distinct intracellular signaling cascade in vascular endothelial cells (ECs), which are directly exposed to blood flow. The ability of ECs to differentially respond to the two types of flow provides an opportunity to identify molecular events that lead to endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. In this review, we will focus on various molecular events, which are differentially regulated by these two flow types. We will discuss how various kinases, ER stress, inflammasome, SUMOylation, and DNA methylation play roles in the differential flow response, endothelial dysfunction, and atherosclerosis. We will also discuss the interplay among the molecular events and how they coordinately regulate flow-dependent signaling and cellular responses. It is hoped that clear understanding of the way how the two flow types beget each unique phenotype in ECs will lead us to possible points of intervention against endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00018-016-2442-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5391278PMC
May 2017
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