Publications by authors named "U Seeta Uthaya Kumar"

667 Publications

Spatial distribution of carbon dynamics and nutrient enrichment capacity in different layers and tree tissues of Castanopsis eyeri natural forest ecosystem.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2021 Sep 13. Epub 2021 Sep 13.

National Engineering Laboratory for Applied Technology in Forestry and Ecology in South China, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha, 410004, China.

Forest ecosystem carbon (C) storage primarily includes vegetation layers C storage, litter C storage, and soil C storage. The precise assessment of forest ecosystem C storage is a major concern that has drawn widespread attention in global climate change worldwide. This study explored the C storage of different layers of the forest ecosystem and the nutrient enrichment capacity of the vegetation layer to the soil in the Castanopsis eyeri natural forest ecosystem (CEF) present in the northeastern Hunan province, central China. The direct field measurements were used for the estimations. Results illustrate that trunk biomass distribution was 48.42% and 62.32% in younger and over-mature trees, respectively. The combined biomass of the understory shrub, herb, and litter layers was 10.46 t·hm, accounting for only 2.72% of the total forest biomass. On average, C content increased with the tree age increment. The C content of tree, shrub, and herb layers was 45.68%, 43.08%, and 35.76%, respectively. Litter C content was higher in the undecomposed litter (44.07 %). Soil C content continually decreased as the soil depth increased, and almost half of soil C was stored in the upper soil layer. Total C stored in CEF was 329.70 t·hm and it follows the order: tree layer > soil layer > litter layer > shrub layer > herb layer, with C storage distribution of 51.07%, 47.80%, 0.78%, 0.25%, and 0.10%, respectively. Macronutrient enrichment capacity from vegetation layers to soil was highest in the herb layer and lowest in the tree layer, whereas no consistent patterns were observed for trace elements. This study will help understand the production mechanism and ecological process of the C. eyeri natural forest ecosystem and provide the basics for future research on climate mitigation, nutrient cycling, and energy exchange in developing and utilizing sub-tropical vegetation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-16400-1DOI Listing
September 2021

High-throughput and versatile design for multi-layer coating deposition using lab automation through Arduino-controlled devices.

Rev Sci Instrum 2021 Aug;92(8):084105

Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816, USA.

Laboratory and experimental scale manufacturing processes are limited by human error (e.g., poor control over motion and personal subjectivity), especially under fatiguing conditions involving precise, repetitive operations, incurring compounding errors. Commercial layer-by-layer (LbL) automation devices are prohibitively high-priced (especially for academic institutions) with limited flexibility in form factor and potentially software-associated constraints/limitations. In this work, a novel automated multi-beaker dip coater was fabricated to facilitate nano cerium oxide/polymer coatings via an LbL dip coating process and the synthesis of nano ceria films via a novel successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method on a glass substrate. Automation of tasks, such as those mediating the detailed procedures, is essential in producing highly reproducible, consistent products/materials as well as in reducing the time commitments for laboratory researchers. Herein, we detail the construction of a relatively large, yet inexpensive, LbL coating instrument that can operate over 90 cm in the horizontal axis, allowing, for example, up to eight 200 ml beakers with accompanying stir plates. The instrument is operated by simple "off-the-shelf" electronics to control the path and timing of the samples with open-source software while providing precision at ±0.01 mm. Furthermore, 3D-printed components were used to maximize the number of substrates that could be coated simultaneously, further improving the sample production rate and reducing waste. Further possibilities for automation beyond the detailed device are provided and discussed, including software interfaces, physical control methods, and sensors for data collection/analysis or for triggers of automated tasks.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/5.0059950DOI Listing
August 2021

Mesenchymal stem cells in SARS-CoV-2 infection: A hype or hope.

Life Sci 2021 Aug 25;284:119901. Epub 2021 Aug 25.

School of Biosciences, IMS Ghaziabad University Courses Campus, NH9, Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh 201015, India; Molecular Oncology Division, Dr. B R Ambedkar Center for Biomedical Research, University of Delhi, North Campus, Delhi 110007, India. Electronic address:

COVID-19 is a serious viral infection that struck the world in December 2019 starting from Wuhan in China, spreading subsequently to all over the world. The disease has baffled scientists and doctors worldwide in terms of its presentation, behaviour, and treatment options till now. A low mortality rate is the only relief we get so far from COVID-19 in terms of numbers. Treatment options have gradually streamlined to steroids and very few FDA approved antiviral as well as plasma therapy and supportive treatment. Monoclonal antibodies are used to tide over any impending cytokine storm but are not equally effective in all patients. Ventilation support is invariably required for moderate to severe disease varying from a simple High Flow non-rebreathing mask to BiPAP (Bilevel Positive Airway Pressure) and HFNO (High-Flow Nasal Oxygen) extending to full-fledge ventilation via a Mechanical Ventilator. Because of the non-availability of satisfactory treatment so far, many researchers from different biomedical fields are looking for alternative therapeutic strategies to manage the pandemic. One such therapeutic approach showing a ray of hope to combat COVID-19 infection is Mesenchymal stem cell therapy. Mesenchymal cells have immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory as well as regenerative properties and various preliminary studies have shown that MSCs can reverse the lung damage and overcome the cytokine storm incited by COVID-19 infection. Also, it has improved the recovery rate of critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation. In this review, we will discuss the possibility and relevance of MSCs in COVID-19 treatment and preview of various MSCs clinical trials.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lfs.2021.119901DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8384731PMC
August 2021

Unraveling the Influence of Land-Use Change on δC, δN, and Soil Nutritional Status in Coniferous, Broadleaved, and Mixed Forests in Southern China: A Field Investigation.

Plants (Basel) 2021 Jul 21;10(8). Epub 2021 Jul 21.

National Engineering Laboratory for Applied Technology in Forestry and Ecology in South China, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha 410004, China.

Natural isotopic abundance in soil and foliar can provide integrated information related to the long-term alterations of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles in forest ecosystems. We evaluated total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and isotopic natural abundance of C (δC) and N (δN) in soil and foliar of coniferous plantation (CPF), natural broadleaved forest (NBF), and mixed forest stands at three different soil depths (i.e., 0-10, 10-20, and 20-40 cm). This study also explored how soil available nutrients are affected by different forest types. Lutou forest research station, located in Hunan Province, central China, was used as the study area. Results demonstrated that the topsoil layer had higher TC and TN content in the mixed forest stand, resulting in a better quality of organic materials in the topsoil layer in the mixed forest than NBF and CPF. In general, soil TC, TN, and δN varied significantly in different soil depths and forest types. However, the forest type did not exhibit any significant effect on δC. Overall, soil δC was significantly enriched in CPF, and δN values were enriched in mixed forest. Foliar C content varied significantly among forest types, whereas foliar N content was not significantly different. No big differences were observed for foliar δN and δC across forest types. However, foliar δC and δN were positively related to soil δC and δN, respectively. Foliar N, soil and foliar C:N ratio, soil moisture content (SMC), and forest type were observed as the major influential factors affecting isotopic natural abundance, whereas soil pH was not significantly correlated. In addition, forest type change and soil depth increment had a significant effect on soil nutrient availability. In general, soil nutrient availability was higher in mixed forest. Our findings implied that forest type and soil depth alter TC, TN, and soil δN, whereas δC was only driven by soil depth. Moreover, plantations led to a decline in soil available nutrient content compared with NBF and mixed forest stands.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/plants10081499DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8398092PMC
July 2021

Evaluation of Bone Regeneration around Implants with and Without Flap Elevation.

J Pharm Bioallied Sci 2021 Jun 5;13(Suppl 1):S699-S705. Epub 2021 Jun 5.

Department of Dentistry, Patna Medical College and Hospital, Patna, Bihar, India.

Background: The aim of this study is to clinically evaluate and compare the clinical success and the relative bone healing of the implants which are placed using a flapless procedure and compare it to those placed by the conventional flap technique.

Materials And Methods: This study was conducted with ten patients that were randomly divided into two groups. Group A included patients with immediately placed implants after extraction with flap elevation. Group B included patients with immediately placed implants after extraction without any flap elevation. The clinical parameters recorded were Plaque index, Modified Gingival Index, Early Wound Healing Index, Buser's criteria, Distance between implant shoulder and the crestal bone (DIB), and Radiographic Examination in a standardized manner to evaluate changes for the DIB values.

Results: There was an improvement in Plaque Score from baseline to 1 month and baseline to abutment placement (6 months), which was statistically significant, but the plaque score from 3 months to abutment placement (6 months) was statistically nonsignificant in both the group. There was an increase in modified gingival score from baseline to 3 months, baseline to abutment placement (6 months), and 3 months to abutment placement (6 months), which was statistically significant in both the groups. The DIB scores in Group A recorded at baseline to 6 months were 2.80 ± 0.57 and 1.90 ± 0.42, respectively, showing a mean difference of -0.90 and = 0.001 in comparison. Whereas, the DIB scores in Group B at baseline to 6 months were 3.20 ± 0.57 and 2.50 ± 0.50, respectively, showing a mean difference of -0.70 and = 0.001 in comparison. The DIC scores in Group A at baseline to 6 months were 1.60 ± 0.54 and 0.00 ± 0.00, respectively, showing a mean difference of -1.60 and = 0.003 in comparison, Whereas the DIC scores in Group B at baseline to 6 months were 1.40 ± 0.54 and 0.00 ± 0.00, respectively, showing a mean difference of -1.40 and = 0.005 in comparison.

Conclusion: Implants placed in fresh extraction sockets with and without mucoperiosteal flap elevation can be successfully done with augmentation procedures. Short-term survival rates and clinical outcomes of both groups were similar and appeared to be predictable treatment modalities.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jpbs.JPBS_691_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8375853PMC
June 2021
-->