Publications by authors named "Tze Chin Tan"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Microbiome and osteoarthritis: New insights from animal and human studies.

Int J Rheum Dis 2021 May 7. Epub 2021 May 7.

Department of Rheumatology & Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore City, Singapore.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of disability, especially among the elderly. With an ageing and increasingly obese population, OA will become more prevalent. Obesity and metabolic syndrome are risk factors for OA and have been implicated in its pathogenesis. The gut microbiome may shed light on this possible common pathogenesis. Recent animal and human studies have gained important insights into the relationship between OA, obesity, and the gut microbiome. Animal studies have demonstrated links between obesity and increased severity of OA and altered gut microbial DNA profile. Use of prebiotics and probiotics in animal trials provides proof-of-concept that interventional options to the gut microbiome can modulate the progression of OA favorably. Current evidence in human studies is limited. Shifts in gut microbial profile and reduced gut microbial diversity have been associated with people with OA, as well as blood and synovial fluid lipopolysaccharide endotoxemia. Linkages between microbiome dysbiosis and host responses may help in the understanding of OA pathogenesis and the discovery of therapeutic targets. This narrative review provides a summary of up-to-date animal and human studies on the gut microbiome and its link with OA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1756-185X.14123DOI Listing
May 2021

The microbiome and systemic sclerosis: A review of current evidence.

Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol 2021 Apr 10:101687. Epub 2021 Apr 10.

Department of Rheumatology & Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore; Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore. Electronic address:

Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is characterized by immune dysregulation, vasculopathy, and fibrosis of multiple organs. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the most common internal organ manifestation, which contributes to significant morbidity and mortality in patients with SSc. Emerging reports have identified unique microbial taxa alterations in the GI microbiome of patients with SSc as compared to healthy controls (HC). These taxa alterations include differences at the phyla (e.g., Bacteroidetes) and genera (e.g., Bacteroides, Clostridium, Faecalibacterium, and Lactobacillus) level. In addition, some genera have been associated with more severe GI symptoms (e.g., Prevotella and Akkermansia). This review summarizes the current evidence on factors influencing the GI microbiome, GI microbiome alterations in SSc as compared to HC, and in SSc subgroups according to disease manifestations. Current exploration in therapeutic interventions that target the GI microbiome is discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.berh.2021.101687DOI Listing
April 2021

Differences between male and female systemic lupus erythematosus in a multiethnic population.

J Rheumatol 2012 Apr 1;39(4):759-69. Epub 2012 Mar 1.

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 East Monument Street, Suite 7500, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.

Objective: Male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are thought to be similar to female patients with SLE, but key clinical characteristics may differ. Comparisons were made between male and female patients with SLE in the Hopkins Lupus Cohort.

Methods: A total of 1979 patients in the Hopkins Lupus Cohort were included in the analysis.

Results: The cohort consisted of 157 men (66.2% white, 33.8% African American) and 1822 women (59.8% white, 40.2% African American). The mean followup was 6.02 years (range 0-23.73). Men were more likely than women to have disability, hypertension, thrombosis, and renal, hematological, and serological manifestations. Men were more likely to be diagnosed at an older age and to have a lower education level. Women were more likely to have malar rash, photosensitivity, oral ulcers, alopecia, Raynaud's phenomenon, or arthralgia. Men were more likely than women to have experienced end organ damage including neuropsychiatric, renal, cardiovascular, peripheral vascular disease, and myocardial infarction, and to have died. In general, differences between males and females were more numerous and striking in whites, especially with respect to lupus nephritis, abnormal serologies, and thrombosis.

Conclusion: Our study suggests that there are major clinical differences between male and female patients with SLE. Differences between male and female patients also depend on ethnicity. Future SLE studies will need to consider both ethnicity and gender to understand these differences.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.111061DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3605704PMC
April 2012

Palladin, an actin-associated protein, is required for adherens junction formation and intercellular adhesion in HCT116 colorectal cancer cells.

Int J Oncol 2010 Oct;37(4):909-26

Department of Physiology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore.

Palladin is a scaffold protein involved in the formation of actin-associated protein complexes. Gene expression array analysis on the poorly metastatic HCT116 colon cancer cell line and a metastatic derivative cell line (E1) with EMT (epithelial-mesenchymal transition) features showed a down-regulation of palladin gene expression in the latter. Knockdown of palladin expression in the HCT116 cells suppressed junctional localization of E-cadherin, reduced intercellular adhesion and collective cell migration, showing that palladin plays an important role in maintaining the integrity of adherens junctions. The acquisition of the EMT features by the E1 cell line was dependent on the Erk pathway. Inhibition of this pathway by U0126 treatment in E1 cells resulted in the re-expression of palladin, relocalization of E-cadherin to the adherens junctions and a reversal of EMT features. The re-establishment of intercellular adhesion was dependent on palladin expression. The down-regulation of palladin was also observed in poorly-differentiated tumor tubules and dissociated tumor cells that have undergone de-differentiation in human primary colon tumors. Our data show that palladin is an integral component of adherens junctions and plays a role in the localization of E-cadherin to the junctions. The loss of palladin may be an integral part of EMT, an early step in the metastatic spread of colon carcinoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/ijo_00000742DOI Listing
October 2010