Publications by authors named "Tyler G Ketterl"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A View from the past into our collective future: the oncofertility consortium vision statement.

Authors:
Teresa K Woodruff Lauren Ataman-Millhouse Kelly S Acharya Teresa Almeida-Santos Antoinette Anazodo Richard A Anderson Leslie Appiah Joy Bader Kerri Becktell Robert E Brannigan Lesley Breech Maria T Bourlon Žana Bumbuliene Karen Burns Lisa Campo-Engelstein Jacira R Campos Grace M Centola Mauricio Barbour Chehin Diane Chen Michel De Vos Francesca E Duncan Ahmed El-Damen Douglas Fair Yemi Famuyiwa Patricia Y Fechner Paula Fontoura Olivia Frias Sabrina A Gerkowicz Jill Ginsberg Clarisa R Gracia Kara Goldman Veronica Gomez-Lobo Brent Hazelrigg Michael H Hsieh Luis R Hoyos Alfonso Hoyos-Martinez Robert Jach Jacek Jassem Murid Javed Yasmin Jayasinghe Roohi Jeelani Jacqueline S Jeruss Nalini Kaul-Mahajan Jessica Keim-Malpass Tyler G Ketterl Mohamed Khrouf Dana Kimelman Atsuko Kusuhara William H Kutteh Monica M Laronda Jung Ryeol Lee Vicky Lehmann Joseph M Letourneau Lynda K McGinnis Eileen McMahon Lillian R Meacham Monserrat Fabiola Velez Mijangos Molly Moravek Leena Nahata George Moses Ogweno Kyle E Orwig Mary Ellen Pavone Fedro Alessandro Peccatori Romina Ileana Pesce Hanna Pulaski Gwendolyn Quinn Ramiro Quintana Tomas Quintana Bruno Ramalho de Carvalho Rosalind Ramsey-Goldman Joyce Reinecke Fernando M Reis Julie Rios Alice S Rhoton-Vlasak Kenny A Rodriguez-Wallberg Cassandra Roeca Seth J Rotz Erin Rowell Mahmoud Salama Amanda J Saraf Anibal Scarella Tara Schafer-Kalkhoff Deb Schmidt Suneeta Senapati Divya Shah Ariella Shikanov Margarett Shnorhavorian Jodi L Skiles James F Smith Kristin Smith Fabio Sobral Kyle Stimpert H Irene Su Kouhei Sugimoto Nao Suzuki Mili Thakur David Victorson Luz Viale Wendy Vitek W Hamish Wallace Ellen A Wartella Lynn M Westphal Stacy Whiteside Lea H Wilcox Christine Wyns Shuo Xiao Jing Xu Mary Zelinski

J Assist Reprod Genet 2021 Jan 6;38(1):3-15. Epub 2021 Jan 6.

Division of Reproductive & Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, OR, USA.

Purpose: Today, male and female adult and pediatric cancer patients, individuals transitioning between gender identities, and other individuals facing health extending but fertility limiting treatments can look forward to a fertile future. This is, in part, due to the work of members associated with the Oncofertility Consortium.

Methods: The Oncofertility Consortium is an international, interdisciplinary initiative originally designed to explore the urgent unmet need associated with the reproductive future of cancer survivors. As the strategies for fertility management were invented, developed or applied, the individuals for who the program offered hope, similarly expanded. As a community of practice, Consortium participants share information in an open and rapid manner to addresses the complex health care and quality-of-life issues of cancer, transgender and other patients. To ensure that the organization remains contemporary to the needs of the community, the field designed a fully inclusive mechanism for strategic planning and here present the findings of this process.

Results: This interprofessional network of medical specialists, scientists, and scholars in the law, medical ethics, religious studies and other disciplines associated with human interventions, explore the relationships between health, disease, survivorship, treatment, gender and reproductive longevity.

Conclusion: The goals are to continually integrate the best science in the service of the needs of patients and build a community of care that is ready for the challenges of the field in the future.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10815-020-01983-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7786868PMC
January 2021

Feasibility of a behavioral intervention using mobile health applications to reduce cardiovascular risk factors in cancer survivors: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

J Cancer Surviv 2020 Oct 10. Epub 2020 Oct 10.

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, PO Box 19024, Mailstop M4-C308, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA.

Purpose: Determine the feasibility of a remotely delivered mobile health (mHealth)-supported intervention to improve diet and physical activity in hematologic malignancy survivors.

Methods: Pilot randomized controlled trial of a 16-week intervention for improving diet and physical activity: individualized goal-setting (daily steps, sodium, saturated fat, added sugar intake) per feedback from mHealth trackers (Fitbit for activity; Healthwatch360 for diet), supplemented by a Facebook peer support group. Controls accessed the trackers without goal-setting or peer support. Everyone received standardized survivorship counseling with tailored advice from a clinician. Actigraphy and food frequency questionnaires assessed activity and diet at baseline and follow-up.

Results: Forty-one participants (51.2% male; median age 45.1 years; 7.0 years from treatment) were randomized (24 intervention; 17 control). Fitbit and Healthwatch360 use were more common among intervention versus control participants (75.0% versus 70.6% and 50.0% versus 17.7% of eligible days, respectively). Most intervention participants (66.7%) engaged with Facebook; overall, 91.7% interacted with the study's mHealth applications. While no comparisons in activity or dietary outcomes between intervention versus control group met statistical significance, the intervention was associated with greater reductions in the targeted dietary factors and improvements in Healthy Eating Index-2015 score, moderate-vigorous physical activity time, and daily steps. Participant retention at 6 months was 90.2%.

Conclusions: An intervention for cardiovascular risk reduction based on individualized goal-setting enhanced by mHealth and social media peer support was feasible and acceptable among cancer survivors.

Implications For Cancer Survivors: Effective and easily disseminated strategies that improve diet and physical activity in this population are needed.

Trial Registration: Registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT03574012) on June 29, 2018.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11764-020-00949-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8035343PMC
October 2020

Perioperative Cardiothoracic and Vascular Risk in Childhood Cancer and its Survivors.

J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 2021 Jan 7;35(1):162-175. Epub 2020 Mar 7.

Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Electronic address:

CHILDREN with cancer and survivors of childhood cancer have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and this risk in the perioperative period must be understood. During diagnosis and treatment of pediatric cancer, multiple acute cardiovascular morbidities are possible, including anterior mediastinal mass, tamponade, hypertension, cardiomyopathy,and heart failure. Childhood cancer survivors reaching late childhood and adulthood experience substantially increased rates of cardiomyopathy, heart failure, valvular disease, pericardiac disease, ischemia, and arrhythmias. Despite considerable advances in the understanding and therapeutic options of pediatric malignancies, cardiac disease remains the most common treatment-related, noncancer cause of death in childhood cancer survivors. Increasingly, molecularly targeted agents, including small molecule inhibitors, are being incorporated into pediatric oncology. The acute and chronic risks associated with these newer therapeutic options in children are not yet well-described, which poses challenges for clinicians caring for these patients. In the present review, the unique risks factors, prevention strategies, and treatment of cardiovascular toxicities of the child with cancer and the childhood cancer survivor are examined, with an emphasis on the perioperative period.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.jvca.2020.02.052DOI Listing
January 2021

Sexual Activity and Substance Use Among Adolescents and Young Adults Receiving Cancer Treatment: A Report from the PRISM Randomized Controlled Trial.

J Adolesc Young Adult Oncol 2020 10 21;9(5):594-600. Epub 2020 Apr 21.

Center for Clinical and Translational Research, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Despite health implications, sexual activity and substance use among adolescents and young adults (AYAs) receiving cancer treatment are understudied. AYAs 12-25 years of age participated in a randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of a resilience intervention. They were fluent in English and either diagnosed with new cancer (NC) or advanced cancer (AC). At baseline and 6 months, participants self-reported sexual activity and substance use. We describe the percentage of AYAs who endorsed each behavior and a count of total behaviors endorsed by each respondent. We describe frequencies by sex/gender (male/female), age (<18/≥18), and disease status (AC/NC). Participants ( = 92) were majority white/Caucasian (57%), 12-17 years old (73%), and diagnosed with leukemia/lymphoma (62%); 32% had AC. Responses were not associated with the intervention; hence, we summarized data from the whole cohort. At both time points, median behavior endorsed was 2. At baseline and follow-up, 87% and 81% endorsed at least 1 behavior: 13% and 15% were sexually active, 75% and 73% of whom used birth control inconsistently; and 22% and 22% reported drinking alcohol, 31% and 27% using prescription opioids/sedatives, 19% and 22% using other drugs, and 9% and 7% using tobacco. Young adults engaged in most behaviors more frequently than adolescents (e.g., 48% vs. 12% alcohol at baseline); males engaged in sexual activity more frequently than females (e.g., 20% vs. 5% sexually active at baseline); and AYAs with NC engaged in most behaviors more frequently than those with AC (18% vs. 0% sexually active at baseline). AYAs engage in sexual activity and substance use during cancer treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jayao.2020.0001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7578176PMC
October 2020

Lasting effects of cancer and its treatment on employment and finances in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors.

Cancer 2019 06 1;125(11):1908-1917. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.

Background: The impact of cancer and its treatment on employment and financial burden in adolescents/young adults (AYAs) is not fully known.

Methods: Eligibility for this cross-sectional study of AYA cancer survivors included the diagnosis of a malignancy between ages 18 and 39 years and survey completion within 1 to 5 years from diagnosis and ≥1 year after therapy completion. Participants were selected randomly from the tumor registries of 7 participating sites and completed an online patient-reported outcomes survey to assess employment and financial concerns. Treatment data were abstracted from medical records. Data were analyzed across diagnoses and by tumor site using logistic regression and Wald-based 95% confidence intervals adjusting for age (categorized), sex, insurance status, education (categorized), and treatment exposures.

Results: Participants included 872 survivors (breast cancer, n = 241; thyroid cancer, n = 126; leukemia/lymphoma, n = 163; other malignancies, n = 342). Exposure to chemotherapy in breast cancer survivors was associated with an increase in self-reported mental impairment in work tasks (odds ratio [OR], 2.66) and taking unpaid time off (OR, 2.62); survivors of "other" malignancies reported an increase in mental impairment of work tasks (OR, 3.67) and borrowing >$10,000 (OR, 3.43). Radiation exposure was associated with an increase of mental impairment in work tasks (OR, 2.05) in breast cancer survivors, taking extended paid time off work in thyroid cancer survivors (OR, 5.05), and physical impairment in work tasks in survivors of "other" malignancies (OR, 3.11). Finally, in survivors of "other" malignancies, having undergone surgery was associated with an increase in physical (OR, 3.11) and mental impairment (OR, 2.31) of work tasks.

Conclusions: Cancer treatment has a significant impact on AYA survivors' physical and mental work capacity and time off from work.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.31985DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6508988PMC
June 2019

Association of Pre-pregnancy BMI and Postpartum Weight Retention Before Second Pregnancy, Washington State, 2003-2013.

Matern Child Health J 2018 09;22(9):1339-1344

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Background Maternal overweight and obesity is one of the most common high-risk obstetric conditions associated with adverse birth outcomes. Smaller studies have suggested that pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) is associated with postpartum weight retention. Objective The primary objective of this study was to examine the association between pre-pregnancy BMI status and maternal weight retention. Study design We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study using Washington State birth certificate data from 2003-2013. We included women who had two sequential births during this time period, with the second birth occurring within 18-36 months of the first singleton delivery date. BMI before a women's first pregnancy ("pre-pregnancy BMI") was categorized as normal (18.5-24.9 kg/m) and overweight/obese (25-40 kg/m). Women were classified as having returned to first pre-pregnancy BMI if their BMI before their second pregnancy was no more than 1 kg/m more compared to their BMI before their first pregnancy. Analyses were stratified by gestational weight gain during the first pregnancy (below, met, exceeded recommended gestational weight gain). Results A total of 49,132 mothers were included in the study. Among women who met their recommended gestational weight gain, compared to mothers with a normal BMI, obese/overweight mothers were less likely to return to their pre-pregnancy BMI (76.5 vs 72.3%; RR = 0.88; 95% CI: 0.85-0.92). A similar pattern was observed among women who exceeded their recommended gestational weight gain (62.6 vs 53.2%; RR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.78-0.80). Conclusion Pre-pregnancy BMI in the overweight/obese range is associated with a decreased likelihood of returning to pre-pregnancy BMI. Further research to support women during and after their pregnancy to promote behavior changes that prevent excessive weight gain during pregnancy and weight retention after birth is needed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10995-018-2514-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6077101PMC
September 2018

Adipokines, Inflammation, and Adiposity in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Survivors.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2018 03 25;24(3):622-626. Epub 2017 Dec 25.

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.

Adult survivors of acute leukemia in childhood have a higher-than-expected frequency of obesity and are at increased risk for metabolic syndrome and early mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD). Adipose tissue has been recognized as an endocrine and paracrine organ that secretes various adipokines involved in metabolic regulation and inflammatory processes. In this study, we examined inflammatory factors (IL-6 and TNF-α) and adipokines (adiponectin, leptin), in addition to body composition and adiposity, in cancer survivors who underwent hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) during childhood compared with sibling controls. Over 2-year survivors of HCT for hematologic malignancies during childhood were recruited from 2 institutions along with a control population of siblings. Participants underwent evaluation for body composition, anthropometric measurements, and assessment of CVD risk factors and adipokines. Cases were stratified by radiation exposure in the preparative regimen (total body irradiation [TBI] + central nervous system [CNS] irradiation, TBI only, chemotherapy only) and adjusted least squares means were estimated for each adipokine and adjusted by age, sex, race, Tanner stage, and percent fat mass (PFM) percentiles (0-24, 25-74, 75+). A total of 151 HCT survivors and 92 siblings underwent evaluation. Significant differences in mean adipokine levels were detected between survivors and siblings; leptin was significantly higher and adiponectin significantly lower in HCT survivors who received TBI with or without CNS irradiation compared with siblings. IL-6 was significantly higher in all groups of HCT survivors compared with siblings. Body mass index (BMI) was similar in survivors and controls, although PFM was significantly higher in all groups of HCT survivors and lean body mass (LBM) was lower in survivors who received TBI with or without CNS radiation compared with siblings. HCT survivors showed an unfavorable profile of inflammation, adipokines, and adiposity, despite similar BMI as controls. Higher PFM and lower LBM may contribute to these findings. TBI exposure is correlated with greater severity of these observations. Increasing LBM may represent a tangible target for mitigating the high cardiometabolic risks of HCT survivors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2017.11.024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5831197PMC
March 2018

Progression of Hip Dysplasia in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I Hurler After Successful Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

J Bone Joint Surg Am 2016 Mar;98(5):386-95

Department of Pediatric Metabolic Diseases, Emma Children's Hospital and Amsterdam Lysosome Center "Sphinx," Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Background: Dysostosis multiplex contributes substantially to morbidity in patients with Hurler syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type I Hurler phenotype [MPS I-H]), even after successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). One of the hallmarks of dysostosis multiplex in MPS I-H is hip dysplasia, which often requires surgical intervention. We sought to describe in detail the course of hip dysplasia in this group of patients, as assessed by radiographic analysis, and to identify potential outcome predictors.

Methods: Longitudinal data were obtained from digitally scored pelvic radiographs of patients with MPS I-H using OrthoGon software for parameters including, but not limited to, the acetabular index, migration percentage, Smith ratio, and neck-shaft angle. Scoring was performed independently by two blinded observers. Additional information on genotype, enzyme replacement therapy pre-HSCT, donor chimerism, and enzyme activity post-HSCT were obtained. General trends and potential correlations were calculated with mixed-model statistics.

Results: Fifty-two patients (192 radiographs) were included in this analysis. Intraobserver and interobserver variation analysis showed an intraclass correlation coefficient ranging from 0.78 to 1.00. Among the twenty-one patients with follow-up beyond the age of five years, the acetabular index was in the range of severe hip dysplasia in up to 86% of the patients. Severe coxa valga was seen in 91% of the patients. Lateral and superior femoral displacement were highly prevalent, with the migration percentage outside the reference range in up to 96% of the patients. Finally, anterior pelvic tilt increased with age (p = 0.001). No correlations were identified between clinical parameters and radiographic findings.

Conclusions: Our study shows that progressive acetabular dysplasia as well as coxa valga and hip displacement are highly prevalent and progressive over time in patients with MPS I-H, despite successful HSCT. These data may provide essential natural history determinations for the assessment of efficacy of new therapeutic strategies aimed at improving skeletal outcomes in patients with MPS I-H.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.O.00601DOI Listing
March 2016

Ofatumumab for refractory opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome following treatment of neuroblastoma.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2013 Dec 29;60(12):E163-5. Epub 2013 Jun 29.

Department of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) may be associated with ANNA-1 (anti-Hu) autoantibodies. The standard treatment with IVIG, steroids, and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody may fail, and optimal therapy is unknown. A patient developed OMS with high-titer ANNA-1 following recovery from neuroblastoma. She failed standard therapy and had only transient response to rituximab. Treatment with the humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody ofatumumab combined with methotrexate resulted in transient neurologic improvement and decrease of ANNA-1. This suggests that ofatumumab combined with methotrexate should further be considered OMS patients, particularly in refractory disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.24646DOI Listing
December 2013