Publications by authors named "Tuğba Erat"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Transient benign hyperphosphatasemia due to COVID-19: the first case report.

J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab 2021 Mar 14;34(3):385-387. Epub 2020 Dec 14.

Sanlıurfa Training and Research Hospital, Clinic of Pediatric Endocrinology, Sanlıurfa, Turkey.

Objectives: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) rapidly spread worldwide in a few months and was declared as a worldwide pandemic by WHO in March 2020. Transient benign hyperphosphatasemia (THI) is a benign condition associated with marked elevation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) without any other kidney, bone, and liver pathologies.

Case Presentation: Herein, we report a previously healthy 16-month-old female patient who developed a secondary transient benign hyperphosphatasemia associated with SARS-CoV-2. Patient whole family's SARS-CoV-2 real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results were positive. Since THI is a diagnosis of exclusion, other reasons that may cause ALP elevation should be ruled out. ALP activity decreased and turned to normal ranges within the following month. THI has been reported to be in association with various conditions. Its relationship with many viruses has been reported previously.

Conclusions: If ALP elevation is detected in patients with COVID 19 due to the increasing number of infections, THI should be considered if there is no other accompanying pathology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/jpem-2020-0503DOI Listing
March 2021

Evaluation of inflammatory parameters in patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis.

Dermatol Ther 2021 Jan 7;34(1):e14603. Epub 2020 Dec 7.

Department of Microbiology, Harran University Medical Faculty, Sanlıurfa, Turkey.

Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a vector-borne parasitic disease characterized by various skin lesions that can cause deformities when healed. Our aim in this study is to show the utility of parameters such as neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), thrombocyte/lymphocyte ratio (TLR), and mean thrombocyte volume (MTV) as auxiliary laboratory methods in CL patients. About 107 patients who were admitted to our dermatological and venereal diseases outpatient clinic between January 2018 and January 2019 and were diagnosed with CL by microscopic examination and 74 healthy individuals were included in the study. There were no significant differences between the patient and control group in terms of neutrophil counts, leukocyte counts, platelet counts, and NLR values (P values: .271, .053, .263, and .459, respectively). When the TLR and MTV values of patients with CL and those of the healthy controls were compared, it was found that TLR and MTV values were statistically higher in patients with CL (P values of .010 and .044, respectively). Based on these data, NLR was not considered to be a suitable parameter for demonstrating inflammation in CL patients, but TLR and MTV were held to be an appropriate parameter for demonstrating inflammation in CL patients. In addition, we think that the increase in MTV and TLR, can be used as an auxiliary laboratory test in the diagnosis of CL disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dth.14603DOI Listing
January 2021

Nosocomial pneumonia caused by water-born Legionella pneumophila in a pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipient for thalassemia major.

Turk J Pediatr 2020 ;62(5):868-871

Departments of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Background: Nosocomial pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 2-14 occurred in a 7-year-old patient following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for thalassemia major.

Case: The patient was diagnosed with nosocomial Legionella pneumophila by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) examination of the bronchoalveolar lavage and culturing Legionella pneumophila serogroup 2-14 from the patient`s room faucet water. Legionella pneumophila was eradicated from our hospital`s water distribution system by superheating and chemical eradication methods (hyper-chlorination and hydrogen peroxide). We did not detect any other case after this event.

Conclusion: Early recognition of contamination of the hospital water system with Legionella proves the importance of prevention in new cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.24953/turkjped.2020.05.022DOI Listing
January 2020

The incidence and clinical effects of Bordetella pertussis in children hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis.

Turk J Pediatr 2020 ;62(5):726-733

Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Background: Pertussis is a disease leading to high morbidity and mortality in neonates and infants. Bronchiolitis is the most common cause of hospitalization especially in children < 2 year-old. Although the clinical findings are different in these two diseases, it is sometimes difficult to make this distinction in partially or fully vaccinated children. This study aimed to identify the incidence, clinical and laboratory effects of B. pertussis as a causative agent in hospitalized children with acute bronchiolitis.

Methods: The study included patients diagnosed with acute bronchiolitis and admitted to the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases from January 2012 to December 2015, aged 24 months or younger, evaluated for viruses and bacteria with polymerase chain reaction in respiratory tract secretions.

Results: The study included 380 patients hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis. Of these patients, 85.8% were identified to be positive for at least one respiratory pathogen. The most commonly identified pathogens were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) A/B, rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, bocavirus and metapneumovirus A/B. B. pertussis was only detected in 5 patients (1.5%). In the patients with B. pertussis identified, coinfection with another virus was observed including rhinovirus (n= 2), influenza A virus (n= 1), coronavirus OC43 (n= 1) and RSV A/B (n= 1). The presence of B. pertussis did not appear to cause any significant clinical or laboratory differences in patients.

Conclusions: B. pertussis is a rare pathogen in patients admitted to hospital for acute bronchiolitis. However, in patients who do not respond to standard bronchiolitis treatment, B. pertussis should be considered as a causative agent. Early identification of this pathogen is important in terms of quarantining the patient, administering appropriate antimicrobial treatment, and prophylactic treatment to household and other close contacts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.24953/turkjped.2020.05.003DOI Listing
November 2020

Atypical and unusual morphological variants of cutaneous leishmaniasis.

Int J Clin Pract 2020 Oct 26:e13730. Epub 2020 Oct 26.

Department of Pathology, Harran University Medical Faculty, Sanliurfa, Turkey.

Objective: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a skin disease characterised by prolonged nodulo-ulcerative lesions of the skin that heals with atrophic scar. Clinical features of CL vary depending on the type of parasite and host immune resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features of atypical and unusual morphological variants of CL patients diagnosed in our clinic.

Materials And Methods: In this prospective study, 27 CL patients with atypical clinical features among 486 patients admitted to our clinic between July 2018 and September 2019 and diagnosed as CL by slit-skin smear examination or histopathological examination were included.

Results: Of 27 patients, 15 (55.5%) were male and 12 (44.5%) were female. The mean age of the patients was 25.8 ± 7.62 years. Seven (25.9%) patients had lupoid lesions, five (18.6%) patients had eczematoid lesions, four (14.8%) patients had lip lesions, three (11.1%) patients had erysipelas-like lesions, two (7.4%) patients had eyelid lesions, two (7.4%) patients had sporotrichoid lesions, two (7.4%) patients had verrucous lesions, one (3.7%) patient had psoriasiform lesion and one (3.7%) patient had paronychial lesion.

Conclusion: In conclusion, rare clinical forms of CL are presented in this study. It should be kept in mind that CL may have very different clinical features and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of eczema, psoriasis, erysipelas, sporotrichosis, paronychia and verrucous lesions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijcp.13730DOI Listing
October 2020

A rare cause of secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: systemic loxoscelism.

Turk J Pediatr 2020 ;62(4):641-646

Divisions of Pediatric Infectious Diseases,Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Background: Loxoscelism is caused by the bite of a specific spider type called the Loxosceles genus. In Turkey, most cases are seen after L. rufescens bites. Clinical manifestation of the bites ranges from local cutaneous reaction to severe ulcerative necrosis. Systemic loxoscelism may also occur.

Case: Herein, we report a previously healthy five-year-old male patient who developed a secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis after a presumed brown spider bite. He was treated with dexamethasone. Within the following 14 days, hemophagocytic syndrome resolved. Local hyperbaric oxygen therapy was applied to the necrotic areas.

Conclusion: Secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis may develop after systemic loxoscelism. In the presence of persistent fever, hepatosplenomegaly and laboratory findings this clinical entity should be kept in mind.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.24953/turkjped.2020.04.014DOI Listing
January 2020

[Frequency of Influenza, Influenza Types and Influenza Vaccine Use in Hospitalized Children with Influenza-Like Symptoms].

Mikrobiyol Bul 2020 Apr;54(2):318-325

Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Ankara, Turkey.

Influenza is an important cause of respiratory illness in children and is still an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children. The influenza virus subtypes determine the prevalence of the epidemic and pandemic influenza, the hospitalization and mortality rates in children each year. Surveillance of the circulation of different influenza virus strains is important in ensuring a good strain con-cordance for the composition of the annual influenza vaccine. The Global Influenza Hospital Surveillance Network® (GIHSN) is an international institution in which tertiary hospitals from many countries participate and where epidemiological surveillance of influenza disease is conducted. Six centers from Turkey participated in the study organized by GIHSN during the influenza season 2016 2017. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the frequency of influenza, virus types, clinical characteristics and vaccination rates in children admitted to our hospital with influenza-like symptoms in the influenza season 2016-2017. Informed consents were obtained from patients. 217 pediatric patients were screened with in the 24th and 48th hours of the hospitalization. Then a nasal/nasopharyngeal swab were collected from 184 patients who met the inclusion criteria. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) was used to obtain laboratory results. Influenza virus, influenza virus subtypes were studied by rRT-PCR. The 83.3% of the patients with positive influenza was under 5 years of age. The rate of influenza positivity was 16.3% (n= 30 patients). Influenza A (H3N2) was the predominant strain in children. The 70% of isolates were influenza A (H3N2) and the 30% were influenza B (Yamagata). There were no case of influenza A (H1N1) or influenza B (Victoria). In 30% of cases with influenza positivity, there was an underlying disease. The most prevalent of them were neuromuscular disease followed by cardiovascular disease and asthma. Tobacco exposure was 86.6% in influenza positive cases. The empirical oseltamivir prescription rate was 28.2%. The vaccination rate of the influenza vaccine was very low (1.6%). The out of 3 patients with influenza positivity were admitted to pediatric intensive care unit, and 2 of them required mechanical ventilation. None of these patients required extracorpereal membrane oxygenation and did not die. Our results highlight the importance of surveillance for influenza and in particular, influenza vaccination rates of groups with risk for morbidity and mortality, such as children, need to be increased.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5578/mb.69358DOI Listing
April 2020

Bloodstream infections in pediatric hematology/oncology patients: Six years’ experience of a single center in Turkey

Turk J Med Sci 2019 08 8;49(4):1157-1164. Epub 2019 Aug 8.

Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey

Background/aim: Bloodstream infections are the major cause of morbidity, increased cost, prolonged hospitalization, and mortality in pediatric patients. Identifying the predominant microorganisms and antimicrobial susceptibilities in centers helps to select effective empirical antimicrobials which leads to positive clinical outcomes. We aimed to identify the causative microorganisms and their antimicrobial susceptibilities in patients with bloodstream infections.

Materials And Methods: Data belonging to patients with hematological and/or oncological diseases admitted to our hospital with fever between January 2010 and November 2015 were analyzed.

Results: In total, 71 patients who had 111 bloodstream infection episodes were included. Responsible pathogens were detected as follows: 35.1% gram-positive microorganisms, 60.5% gram-negative bacteria, and 4.4% fungi. The most common causative gram-negative pathogen was Escherichia coli and the most commonly isolated gram-positive microorganism was coagulase-negative staphylococci.

Conclusion: Gram-negative microorganisms were predominant pathogens in bloodstream infections. Escherichia coli and coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most commonly isolated responsible pathogens. Beta-lactam/lactamase inhibitors were suitable for empirical treatment. However, in critical cases, colistin could have been used for empirical treatment until the culture results were available. Routine glycopeptide use was not required. By identifying the causative microorganisms and their antimicrobial resistance patterns, it will be possible to obtain positive clinical results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3906/sag-1812-101DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7018311PMC
August 2019

Is antibiotic lock therapy effective for the implantable longterm catheter-related bloodstream infections in children?

Turk J Pediatr 2019 ;61(6):895-904

Departments of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Tural Kara T, Özdemir H, Erat T, Yahşi A, Aysev AD, Taçyıldız N, Ünal E, İleri T, İnce E, Haskoloğlu Ş, Çiftçi E, İnce E. Is antibiotic lock therapy effective for the implantable long-term catheter-related bloodstream infections in children? Turk J Pediatr 2019; 61: 895-904. Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) are an important problem in pediatric patients with central venous catheters. This study aimed to determine the incidence of CRBSIs, responsible pathogens and outcomes of antibiotic lock treatment (ALT) in pediatric patients. Between January 2010 and November 2015 all hospitalized pediatric hematology, oncology and immunology patients diagnosed with CRBSIs were retrospectively analyzed. Seventy-eight CRBSI episodes were detected in 60 pediatric patients. The incidence of CRBSIs was 4.20/1000 catheter days. The most frequently detected pathogen was methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella spp., and Escherichia coli were other commonly isolated microorganisms. ALT was administered in 42 patients. The success rate of ALT was 81% (34/42). Catheter was removed without ALT in 36 episodes. Common reasons for catheter removal were sepsis and causative microorganisms which had high probability of biofilm formation. CRBSIs are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients. ALT is safe and effective. It is possible to obtain satisfactory results when ALT is used with intravenous systemic antibiotics for CRBSIs, though in some cases catheter removal is necessary. ALT helps to prevent unnecessary catheter removal in pediatric patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.24953/turkjped.2019.06.011DOI Listing
August 2020

Underlying Diseases and Causative Microorganisms of Recurrent Pneumonia in Children: A 13-Year Study in a University Hospital.

J Trop Pediatr 2019 Jun;65(3):224-230

Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Ankara University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey.

Pneumonia is a significant cause of death for children, particularly those in developing countries. The records of children who were hospitalized because of pneumonia between January 2003 and December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed, and patients who met the recurrent pneumonia criteria were included in this study. During this 13-year period, 1395 patients were hospitalized with pneumonia; of these, 129 (9.2%) met the criteria for recurrent pneumonia. Underlying diseases were detected in 95 (73.6%) patients, with aspiration syndrome (21.7%) being the most common. Rhinovirus (30.5%), adenovirus (17.2%) and respiratory syncytial virus (13.9%) were the most frequent infectious agents. These results demonstrate that underlying diseases can cause recurrent pneumonia in children. Viruses are also commonly seen in recurrent pneumonia. Appropriate treatments should be chosen based on an analysis of the underlying disease, the patient's clinical condition and the laboratory and radiological data.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tropej/fmy037DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7107262PMC
June 2019

Calcaneus osteomyelitis secondary to Guthrie test: case report.

Arch Argent Pediatr 2016 Aug 1;114(4):e260-3. Epub 2016 Aug 1.

Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Ankara University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey.

Calcaneus osteomyelitis is a rare infection in newborns. Invasive procedures, prematurity and low birth wight are some causative factors. The clinical signs may be mild. We report a neonate with calcaneous osteomyelitis which was secondary to a Guthrie test sample. She was admitted to hospital with swelling, redness and increased temperature on her heel. Superficial tissue ultrasound showed fluid collection with heavy content was observed on the posterior of the right foot. Puncture and drainage was performed and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from the drainage culture. Extremity magnetic resonance imaging showed tissue defect in right foot, edema-inflammation and contrast enhancement. Intravenous sulbactam-ampicillin and oral amoxicillin and clavulanic acid were given for 6 weeks. In follow-up, clinical symptoms recovered without curettage. In conclusion; calcaneous osteomyelitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of swelling on heel in neonates who have been applied to invasive procedures as Guthrie test sample.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5546/aap.2016.eng.e260DOI Listing
August 2016