Publications by authors named "Tsuyoshi Yatagai"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Protective role of Galectin-7 for skin barrier impairment in atopic dermatitis.

Clin Exp Allergy 2020 08 14;50(8):922-931. Epub 2020 Jun 14.

Department of Dermatology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan.

Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) patients have a barrier disorder in association with Th2 dominant skin inflammation. Galectin-7 (Gal-7), a soluble unglycosylated lectin, is highly expressed in the stratum corneum of AD patients. However, the biological significance of increased Gal-7 expression in AD skin lesions remains unclear.

Objective: We aimed to investigate the production mechanism and functional role of Gal-7 in AD patients and IL-4/IL-13-stimulated epidermal keratinocytes.

Methods: We assessed the Gal-7 expression levels in skin lesions and sera from AD patients. Gal-7 levels were also measured in monolayered normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) and 3-dimensional (3D)-reconstructed epidermis in the presence or absence of IL-4/IL-13 with or without Stat3, Stat6 or Gal-7 gene silencing.

Results: Gal-7 was highly expressed in the stratum corneum or intercellular space of AD lesional epidermis as assessed by the stratum corneum proteome analysis and immunohistochemistry. A positive correlation was noted between serum Gal-7 level and transepidermal water loss in patients with AD. These clinical findings were corroborated by our in vitro data, which showed that IL-4/IL-13 facilitated the extracellular release of endogenous Gal-7 in both monolayered NHEKs and 3D-reconstructed epidermis. This machinery was caused by IL-4/IL-13-induced cell damage and inhibited by knockdown of Stat6 but not Stat3 in NHEKs. Moreover, we performed Gal-7 knockdown experiment on 3D-reconstructed epidermis and the result suggested that endogenous Gal-7 serves as a protector from IL-4/IL-13-induced disruption of cell-to-cell adhesion and/or cell-to-extracellular matrix adhesion.

Conclusion And Clinical Relevance: Our study unveils the characteristic of Gal-7 and its possible role as an alarmin that reflects the IL-4/IL-13-induced skin barrier impairment in AD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cea.13672DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7496409PMC
August 2020

Decreased expression of suprabasin induces aberrant differentiation and apoptosis of epidermal keratinocytes: Possible role for atopic dermatitis.

J Dermatol Sci 2019 Sep 27;95(3):107-112. Epub 2019 Jul 27.

Department of Dermatology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan. Electronic address:

Background: Suprabasin (SBSN), a secreted protein, is expressed in various epithelial tissues. The role of SBSN in epidermal differentiation and atopic dermatitis (AD) pathology remains largely unknown.

Objective: To evaluate the effects of SBSN on epidermal keratinocytes and its role in AD.

Methods: We examined the SBSN expression levels in the stratum corneum and the epidermis by proteome analysis and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The serum SBSN concentration was measured by ELISA. These values were compared between AD and healthy control. Morphological changes in the epidermis were investigated in SBSN-knockdown three-dimensional human living skin equivalent (LSE) model with or without IL-4/IL-13.

Results: Epidermal SBSN expression was decreased in AD lesional skin compared to healthy skin, as assessed by the stratum corneum proteome analysis and immunohistochemistry. The SBSN serum levels were significantly lower in AD patients than in normal subjects (P<0.05). The SBSN-deficient LSE exhibited compact stratum corneum, immature stratum granulosum, and increased keratinocyte apoptosis. Th2 cytokines, IL-4 and IL-13, did not affect SBSN expression in LSE. There were no differentiation-associated makers that were affected by the SBSN knockdown. SBSN deficiency-induced apoptosis of keratinocytes was exaggerated by IL-4/IL-13, and accordingly, the addition of recombinant SBSN induced significant keratinocyte proliferation (P<0.05).

Conclusion: Our data demonstrated that SBSN regulates normal epidermal barrier. Th2 cytokines unaffect SBSN expression in keratinocytes, but promote SBSN deficiency-induced apoptosis. It is suggested that SBSN has an anti-apoptotic activity, and its deficiency is involved in the pathogenesis of AD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdermsci.2019.07.009DOI Listing
September 2019

Sensitive skin is highly frequent in extrinsic atopic dermatitis and correlates with disease severity markers but not necessarily with skin barrier impairment.

J Dermatol Sci 2018 Jan 2;89(1):33-39. Epub 2017 Nov 2.

Department of Dermatology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan. Electronic address:

Background: Sensitive skin is a condition of cutaneous hypersensitivity to environmental factors. Lactic acid stinging test (LAST) is commonly used to assess sensitive skin and composed of four distinct sensations (pain, burning sensation, itch, and crawly feeling). A link between sensitive skin and barrier dysfunction has been proposed in atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. However, clinical and laboratory factors that are associated with sensitive skin remain unelucidated.

Objective: To investigate relationship between sensitive skin and AD-associated markers.

Methods: Forty-two Japanese AD patients and 10 healthy subjects (HS) were enrolled. AD patients were divided into extrinsic (EAD; high IgE levels) and intrinsic (IAD; normal IgE levels) types. We conducted 1% LAST by assessing the four distinct sensations and calculated the frequencies of sensitive skin in EAD, IAD, and HS. We also performed clinical AD-related tests, including transepidermal water loss (TEWL), visual analogue scale (VAS) of pruritus, and quality of life, and measured laboratory markers, including blood levels of IgE, CCL17/TARC, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and eosinophil counts, and concentration levels of serum Th1/Th2 cytokines. Filaggrin (FLG) mutations were examined in 21 patients. These values were subjected to correlation analyses with each of the four sensation elements.

Results: According to the standard criteria for LAST positivity, the frequencies of LAST-positive subjects were 54.8% and 10.0% in AD and HS, respectively (P=0.014). EAD patients showed a significantly (P=0.026) higher frequency of positive LAST (65.6%) than did IAD patients (20.0%). Among the four LAST sensation elements, the crawly feeling and pain scores positively correlated with VAS of pruritus, total serum IgE, mite-specific IgE, CCL17/TARC, and/or LDH. There was no association of the LAST scores with serum Th1/Th2 cytokine levels. Notably, neither TEWL nor FLG mutations correlated with LAST positivity or any sensation scores.

Conclusions: The frequency of sensitive skin is higher in EAD than in IAD. Sensitive skin is associated with AD severity, but not necessarily with barrier condition.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdermsci.2017.10.011DOI Listing
January 2018

Gross cystic disease fluid protein 15 in stratum corneum is a potential marker of decreased eccrine sweating for atopic dermatitis.

PLoS One 2015 28;10(4):e0125082. Epub 2015 Apr 28.

Department of Dermatology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan.

It is well known that eccrine sweating is attenuated in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). We have reported by using proteome analysis that gross cystic disease fluid protein 15 (GCDFP15), a substance secreted from eccrine sweat glands, is decreased in tape-stripped stratum corneum (SC) samples from AD patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate GCDFP15 production by eccrine glands with SC samples and to assess sweating in AD. SC samples were obtained from 51 healthy control (HC) and 51 AD individuals. Sweat samples were from 18 HC and 12 AD subjects. GCDFP15 was quantified by ELISA. By immunohistochemistry, the expression of GCDFP15 in eccrine glands was examined in normal and AD skin specimens. To identify GCDFP15-producing cells, double immunofluorescence staining for GCDFP15 and S100 protein was performed in frozen sections. To address the mechanism underlying the decreased eccrine sweating in AD patients, we examined the expression of cholinergic receptor M3 (CHRM3), a receptor for acetylcholine-induced sweating, in eccrine sweat glands. The amounts of GCDFP15 in the SC extracts were significantly lower in AD than HC (P < 0.0001). The sweat samples from AD patients also had lower levels of GCDFP15 concentration (P < 0.05). Immunohistochemistry showed positive GCDFP15 staining in the eccrine gland secretory cells and the ductal and acrosyringial lumen in normal skin, but AD lacked clear staining. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that GCDFP15 was co-expressed with S100 protein, suggesting that the clear cell of eccrine glands produces GCDFP15. Finally, we found that the expression of CHRM3 was depressed in AD, suggesting contribution to the low sweating. The SC of AD patients contains a low amount of GCDFP15 due to both low sweating and low GCDFP15 concentration in the sweat. GCDFP15 in SC is a potential marker for dysregulated sweating in AD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0125082PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4412570PMC
April 2016
-->